Saturday, June 8, 2013

[Gd] Bridging Mobile Backend as a Service to Enterprise Systems with Google App Engine and Kinvey

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Cloud Platform Blog: Bridging Mobile Backend as a Service to Enterprise Systems with Google App Engine and Kinvey

The following post was contributed by Ivan Stoyanov, VP of Engineering for Kinvey, a mobile Backend as a Service provider and Google Cloud Platform partner. Kinvey helps individual and enterprise developers dramatically reduce the time and cost of developing and maintaining a backend for their native and HTML5 mobile apps.



Over the past year at Kinvey we have observed a number of mobile development trends. First, developers are building more complex mobile apps and need to take them to market faster. Second, enterprise use cases are now the rule, not the exception. They present specific security and data transformation requirements which demand unique features. Third, even if Backend as a Service, or BaaS, meets the immediate requirements of an application, mobile developers need the peace of mind that their backend platform will be flexible enough to meet their needs in the future.



The best way for us to stay ahead of these trends and ensure we continue to meet developer requirements was to roll down the stack and integrate with Google App Engine. This integration makes it possible for developers to write code on App Engine and have that code run seamlessly as part of their Kinvey backend, offering more choice and flexibility to support more complex app requirements.



Increasingly Complex Requirements

Kinvey’s answer to complex custom requirements has been Business Logic (KBL). This feature allows developers to write their own code, in JavaScript, which Kinvey executes in a multi-tenant virtualized environment based on node.js. KBL supports common use cases such as message triggers on data changes and accessing third party APIs.



Yet as use cases grow in complexity, we find this feature is limited in several ways:




  1. The APIs are highly asynchronous. For many developers this is not a problem, but for a growing number of them, the execution flows are confusing and the complexity beyond a single page of code gets very high.

  2. Code is limited to a single language - JavaScript. Android developers, for example, are much more comfortable in Java territory, as are enterprise web application developers.

  3. Only Kinvey-approved modules are allowed.




Over the next month, as a technology partner of Google, we will make it possible for Business Logic code to run on Google App Engine, seamlessly hooking the App Engine app into your Kinvey backend. Developers will be able to write code in multiple languages, such as Java and Python, with simpler synchronous APIs as well as take advantage of Google App Engine’s development workflows.



Most importantly, developers will be able to go beyond Kinvey’s sandbox requirements and run virtually any APIs, including the large set of built-in App Engine APIs. For example, an app can take a user uploaded image and resize and convert it using the Image API, or use the XMPP API to enable instant messaging in a collaborative app.



Enterprise Features

Business-to-enterprise applications need to connect to on-prem database systems. Mission-critical apps have especially high requirements - a mobile application that connects to an existing CRM system needs complex user authorization and data transformation flows.



For enterprise mobile developers, this integration means easily running secure instances of Kinvey Data Link and Auth Link on App Engine to unlock enterprise databases such as a CRM system and performing complex BPI integrations.



Peace of Mind

By virtue of being a Platform as a Service (PaaS), Google App Engine provides stronger isolation, allowing developers to run virtually any code they want. This will allow for highly custom use cases to be offloaded to the PaaS infrastructure, while the backbone remains the out of the box backend provided by BaaS.



We think of this integration as bringing together the best of two worlds: BaaS and PaaS. The combination of these two cloud-based services allows developers to easily build complex applications on of a virtually limitless platform. As you can see in the Mobile Cloud Reference Architecture (below), we see Google App Engine as a bridge from BaaS to Enterprise systems.









For more information on the Kinvey / Google App Engine partnership and to get started building your enterprise mobile apps, visit us at kinvey.com/google-cloud.



- Contributed by Ivan Stoyanov, VP of Engineering, Kinvey




URL: http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.com/2013/06/bridging-mobile-backend-as-a-service-kinvey.html

Friday, June 7, 2013

[Gd] Dev Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update

The Dev Channel has been updated to 29.0.1530.2 for Windows, Linux and Chrome Frame along with 29.0.1530.4 for Mac. This release fixes some known crashes, as well as other bugs.

Fixed Issue:
  • [244090] Cached CSS file is used regardless of media type
A full list of changes is available in the SVN log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/06/dev-channel-update.html

[Gd] Chrome Beta for Android Update

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Chrome Releases: Chrome Beta for Android Update

The Chrome for Android Beta channel has been updated to 28.0.1500.37. This release contains additional stability and other general bug fixes. Key fixes include:
  • 247034: Dangerous download infobar is shown for almost every download 
  • 244052: PDF file isn't downloading with Flywheel enabled 
  • 178893: Multiple new tabs links displayed in tab history when tapping on NTP tabs
A partial list of changes in this build is available in the SVN revision log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/06/chrome-beta-for-android-update.html

Thursday, June 6, 2013

[Gd] Google Play Developer 8-Step Checkup

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Android Developers Blog: Google Play Developer 8-Step Checkup

Posted by Ellie Powers, Google Play team



random_droid


Google Play gives you tons of options on publishing your apps and connecting with users. But as you get started with new features like beta testing and staged rollouts, it’s a good idea to do a checkup and make sure you’ve covered the basics.



1. Boost your developer account security



  • If you take just one step today to protect your Google Play apps, enable two-step authentication for your Google account, and encourage the rest of your team to do the same.

  • Next, many developers first set up their Google Play account with their personal gmail account, but it’s actually a good idea to transfer your apps to a separate account. All of your installations and reviews remain intact. If you haven’t done this already, transfer your apps to a new account today.

  • Don’t share passwords. Instead, add each individual who needs access and only grant the minimum level of access they need — and encourage them to enable two-step authentication.

  • Review the list of people with access regularly, and when people leave your project, make it a standard practice to remove their access. Learn more about developer account security.



2. Protect your keystore


In order to publish an update to an existing app, you’ll need to sign it with the same keystore every time. If you lose your keystore, you’ll lose your history and reviews, so you’ll need to start over with new apps with new package name and a new key, so you’ll want to make sure you protect it. First, choose a secure password, and don’t use the same password that you use for your Google account. Next, back up your keystore somewhere, but don’t upload it to Google Drive with an account you use to publish on Google Play.



3. Check your email addresses


As a developer, you are responsible for checking two important email addresses:



  • Account owner email address: Google uses the address used to register your Developer Console to contact you about your apps and account, so it is extremely important that someone is responsible for checking it regularly. If necessary, you can forward messages from this account via Gmail, or transfer your apps to another account.

  • Customer support email address: For each individual application, you can specify the best way for users to contact you for customer support. Ensure that a valid support email address for your product is specified. As a best practice, this should probably be a designated support account that is checked regularly and not the same email as the address used to login to the Developer Console.



4. Familiarize yourself with the policies


We recently launched some new guides and examples for Google Play’s Developer Program Policies and Developer Distribution Agreement. Note that once you publish an app as free, you can’t change it to a paid app later, though you can add in-app products.



5. Set up team processes


You may have many people involved with your Google Play apps. Make sure roles are clear in terms of whose job it is to publish updates, check statistics and optimization tips, read and reply to user reviews, and track revenue. Make sure all of these people have the right access to the Developer Console. Many developers who are part of larger organizations also report to their larger teams about their apps’ performance. Designate someone to make sure your app description, graphics (including localized and tablet screenshots), and pricing are up to date.



6. Configure your Developer Console UI languages


To change the language you want to see the Developer Console in, set your primary language. If you speak additional languages, configure those, too — user reviews in those languages won’t be translated automatically in the Developer Console. That was a popular request from developers.



7. Refresh your app’s marketing materials




8. Stay on top of developer news


To make sure you’re aware of the latest Google Play updates for developers, make sure you check the Android Developers blog regularly, follow +Android Developers, and check the Developer Console regularly for announcements.


URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/06/google-play-developer-8-step-checkup.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 28.0.1500.35 (Platform version: 4100.38.3 for most platforms, 4100.38.4 for Cr-48) for all Chrome OS devices except Samsung Chromebooks. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements.
Systems will be receiving updates over the next several days.


Some highlights of these changes are:

  • New fullscreen mode - hit the fullscreen button to hide the Chrome toolbar until you hover at the top for a more immersive browsing experience.
  • Fixed crashes with enabling certain extensions (233414)
  • Fixed issue when connecting via slower 3G connections may be unable to login when creating a new user. (239139)
  • Fixed issue when logging in via a captive portal access point does not show a login screen. (237214)
  • Several crash fixes
Known Issues:
  • Playing certain formats of high definition videos in the Media Player may generate an error while playing the video. (245505)
  • On Chromebook Pixel systems, a message may appear saying "Charging not reliable" when the battery is close to fully charged.

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).


Danielle Drew
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/06/beta-channel-update-for-chrome-os.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

The Beta channel has been updated to 28.0.1500.37 for Windows, Mac, and Chrome Frame, and 28.0.1500.36 for Linux.  Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log.

For more information about features coming to Chrome, check out the Chrome Blog.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Anthony Laforge
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/06/beta-channel-update.html

[Gd] Making Google’s CalDAV and CardDAV APIs available for everyone

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Google Developers Blog: Making Google’s CalDAV and CardDAV APIs available for everyone

Author PhotoBy Piotr Stanczyk, Tech Lead

In March we announced that CalDAV, an open standard for accessing calendar data across the web, would become a partner-only API because it appeared that almost all the API usage was driven by a few large developers. Since that announcement, we received many requests for access to CalDAV, giving us a better understanding of developers’ use cases and causing us to revisit that decision. In response to those requests, we are keeping the CalDAV API public. And in the spirit of openness, today we’re also making CardDAV – an open standard for accessing contact information across the web – available to everyone for the first time.

Both of these APIs are getting other updates as well:
In addition, the CalDAV API now has a new endpoint:
https://apidata.googleusercontent.com/caldav/v2


Piotr Stanczyk is the Tech Lead of the Google Calendar APIs group. His current focus is to provide next generation Calendar APIs which make developers’ lives easier. He also participates in CalConnect consortium.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor


URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/06/making-googles-caldav-and-carddav-apis.html

[Gd] Hacking for change at Google

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Google Developers Blog: Hacking for change at Google

Author PictureBy Patrick Copeland, Google.org

Cross-posted with the Google.org Blog

On June 1st and 2nd, thousands of developers from across the U.S. came together at nearly 100 different locations to participate in the first ever National Day of Civic Hacking. Using public data recently released by the government on topics like crime, health and the environment, developers built new applications that help address social challenges.


At the Googleplex in Mountain View, we hosted nearly 100 developers, statisticians, data scientists, and designers, who stayed long into the night hacking together prototypes that show how data on health and the environment can be used to enrich lives. Fusion Tables and Google App Engine were used to prototype, and groups relied on BigQuery as a workhorse to crunch the biggest datasets. Participants used Google+ Hangouts to connect with hackathons in other states and collaborated with Google Apps and platforms.

Here are a few highlights from the hackathon that stood out as useful, visually stunning, and informative ways to use public data:
  • Eat Healthy for Less, the winner of our Mountain View hackathon, is a mobile web application that uses the Consumer Pricing Index to suggest healthy recipes that can be made on a budget.
  • Data+, a reimagining of how we access data, can make exploring public datasets more intuitive and easily understandable for everyone.
  • Detoxic.org is a web experience and Android app that shows you toxic sites and landfills nearby that you might not know about so that you can take civic action against toxic waste.
Many of the ideas have great potential, and we are encouraging participants to continue their work. We hope that the National Day of Civic Hacking will be a catalyst for innovation in this space, and encourage you to keep track of our tools for civic developers at g.co/civicdevelopers.


Congratulations and thanks to everyone who participated!


Patrick Copeland is director of engineering at Google.org, where he works to build systems that leverage Google's reach to help people around the world.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/06/hacking-for-change-at-google.html

[Gd] A classic boardwalk game rolls from your phone to your computer—using only your browser

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Google Developers Blog: A classic boardwalk game rolls from your phone to your computer—using only your browser

Author PhotoBy Pete LePage, Developer Advocate and Boardwalk King

Cross-posted from the Chromium Blog

Last week we launched Roll It, a Chrome Experiment that links phones to computers and gets people out of their chairs and swinging. We wanted to share how we built a physical game experience with no dedicated hardware. It requires just the web, your computer and a phone.

Here’s a look at the APIs and browser-based features we used to create it.


Roll It is a three-dimensional (3D) experience, from the swing of your phone’s accelerometer right up to the virtual models rendered on your computer’s HTML5 Canvas. On the phone side, we hooked into browser events like DeviceOrientation and DeviceMotion to detect the speed and direction of a swing. On the computer side we rendered our scene using Three.js and plugged in Physijs to add physics to the ball and environment.

To sync the phone to the computer we employed WebSockets which enable rapid two-way communication between devices via a central server.

For extra stability we built our backend on Google Cloud Platform:
We couldn’t have brought this experiment to life without a great team. The theme for Roll It was composed by Mr. Tim Healey. Legwork Studio developed the interfaces and game environment, and teamed up with Mode Set for the development.

To dig deeper into the technology behind Roll It, check out the HTML5 Rocks Case Study, or join the team for a Google Developers Live event this Friday, June 7, 2013 at 5pm GMT for an in-depth discussion.


Pete LePage is a Developer Advocate on the Google Chrome team and helps developers create great web applications and mobile web experiences.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor

URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/06/a-classic-boardwalk-game-rolls-from.html

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

[Gd] Cloud SQL API: YOU get a database! And YOU get a database! And YOU get a database!

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Cloud Platform Blog: Cloud SQL API: YOU get a database! And YOU get a database! And YOU get a database!

Google Cloud SQL lets developers host their MySQL databases on Google Cloud Platform. We take care of replicating the data, backups, updates and other admin overheads so you can concentrate on launching great applications. The Cloud SQL API we are launching today makes it easier to manage lots of instances programmatically by providing an API for common tasks such as creating and deleting instances, increasing or reducing their size, and taking and restoring backups.



For example, you can create a new database instance in your project like this:

curl --header "Authorization: Bearer youraccesstoken" \
--header "Content-Type: application/json" \
https://www.googleapis.com/sql/v1beta1/projects/yourprojectid/instances \
--data "{\"instance\" : \"instancename\", \"project\" : \"yourprojectid\",
\"settings\" : {\"tier\" : \"D2\"}}" -X POST

Orangescape is already using the API to run Kissflow, their popular workflow SaaS. They provide a separate instance for each of their customers, which gives great performance and security isolation (they avoid the ‘noisy neighbor’ problem). The result is thousands of customers and thousands of databases, and they use the Cloud SQL API to manage them all. This integrates the database management process into their service -- create, delete, backup, scale up, scale down -- with no admin overhead.



The Cloud SQL API is now available and you can read more about Orangescape’s experience in this case study.



- Posted by Joe Faith, Product Manager
URL: http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.com/2013/06/cloud-sql-api-you-get-database-and-you.html

[Gd] A classic boardwalk game rolls from your phone to your computer—using only your browser

| More

Chromium Blog: A classic boardwalk game rolls from your phone to your computer—using only your browser

Last week we launched Roll It, a Chrome Experiment that links phones to computers and gets people out of their chairs and swinging. We wanted to share how we built a physical game experience with no dedicated hardware. It requires just the web, your computer and a phone.

Here’s a look at the APIs and browser-based features we used to create it.


Roll It is a three-dimensional (3D) experience, from the swing of your phone’s accelerometer right up to the virtual models rendered on your computer’s HTML5 Canvas. On the phone side, we hooked into browser events like DeviceOrientation and DeviceMotion to detect the speed and direction of a swing. On the computer side we rendered our scene using Three.js and plugged in Physijs to add physics to the ball and environment.

To sync the phone to the computer we employed WebSockets which enable rapid two-way communication between devices via a central server.

For extra stability we built our backend on Google Cloud Platform:
We couldn’t have brought this experiment to life without a great team. The theme for Roll It was composed by Mr. Tim Healey. Legwork Studio developed the interfaces and game environment, and teamed up with Mode Set for the development.

To dig deeper into the technology behind Roll It, check out the HTML5 Rocks Case Study, or join the team for a Google Developers Live event this Friday, June 7, 2013 at 5pm GMT for an in-depth discussion.

Posted by Pete LePage, Developer Advocate and Boardwalk King
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2013/06/a-classic-boardwalk-game-rolls-from.html

[Gd] Stable Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Stable Channel Update

The Stable channel has been updated to 27.0.1453.110 for Windows, Macintosh, Linux and Chrome Frame platforms.

Security fixes and rewards:

Please see the Chromium security page for more information. (Note that the referenced bugs may be kept private until a majority of our users are up to date with the fix.)

This automatic update includes security fixes. We’d like to highlight the following fixes for various reasons (crediting external researchers, issuing rewards, or highlighting particularly interesting issues):

  • [Windows only] [$2000] [243339] High CVE-2013-2854: Bad handle passed to renderer. Credit to Collin Payne.
  • [$500] [242322] Medium CVE-2013-2855: Memory corruption in dev tools API. Credit to “daniel.zulla”.
  • [$1000] [242224] High CVE-2013-2856: Use-after-free in input handling. Credit to miaubiz.
  • [$1000] [240124] High CVE-2013-2857: Use-after-free in image handling. Credit to miaubiz.
  • [$500] [239897] High CVE-2013-2858: Use-after-free in HTML5 Audio. Credit to “cdel921”.
  • [$1500] [237022] High CVE-2013-2859: Cross-origin namespace pollution. Credit to “bobbyholley”.
  • [$1337] [225546] High CVE-2013-2860: Use-after-free with workers accessing database APIs. Credit to Collin Payne.
  • [$1000] [209604] High CVE-2013-2861: Use-after-free with SVG. Credit to miaubiz.
  • [$1000] [161077] High CVE-2013-2862: Memory corruption in Skia GPU handling. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
  • [232633] Critical CVE-2013-2863: Memory corruption in SSL socket handling. Credit to Sebastien Marchand of the Chromium development community.
  • [239134] High CVE-2013-2864: Bad free in PDF viewer. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contributions by Gynvael Coldwind, both from Google Security Team.

In addition, our ongoing internal security work was as usual responsible for a wide range of fixes:

[246389] High CVE-2013-2865: Various fixes from internal audits, fuzzing and other initiatives.

Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Karen Grunberg

Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/06/stable-channel-update.html

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

[Gd] Get your mobile application backed by the cloud with the Mobile Backend Starter

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Cloud Platform Blog: Get your mobile application backed by the cloud with the Mobile Backend Starter

(cross-posted on the Android Developers Blog)



Many of the best mobile app experiences are powered by services in the cloud. However, running your own servers can detract from focusing on your client experience. Google App Engine has long been a fantastic platform for mobile developers such as Pulse and SongPop. Now with the Mobile Backend Starter, we've made it even easier for you to get started with App Engine.

Mobile Backend Starter

Mobile Backend Starter is a one-click deployable, complete mobile backend that allows you to reap the benefits of a cloud backend with none of the headaches. It provides a ready-to-deploy, general purpose cloud backend and a general purpose client-side framework for Android.



Mobile Backend Starter gives you everything you need to rapidly set up a backend for your app, without needing to write any backend code. It includes a server that stores your data with App Engine and a client library and sample app for Android that make it easy to access that data. You can also add support for Google Cloud Messaging (GCM) and continuous queries that notify your app of events you are interested in. To keep users data secure, Mobile Backend Starter also includes built-in support for Google Authentication.







Features of Mobile Backend Starter include:

  • Cloud data storage: Users change devices and increasingly use multiple devices. Store any amount of data per user in the cloud to be accessed from anywhere.

  • Pub/Sub messaging: Send messages from one device, to any or all other devices. You can easily use 1:1 and 1:many messaging as well as broadcasting. This feature is useful for various applications including social apps, forums, chat, gaming, and group collaborations.

  • Push notifications: Data updated on one device is automatically available on all devices with GCM for Android.

  • Continuous queries: Create queries that run continuously on the server, automatically feeding updates to the client. These queries are powered by Prospective Search.

  • Google authentication and authorization: Keep data isolated per user or shared among users.

  • Free to get started, scales effortlessly with your needs: You can start by handling hundreds of users for free, then grow to any scale.

Quick setup and integration

You can setup and run the Mobile Backend Starter in just a few steps:

  1. First, go to the http://cloud.google.com/console, and create a project. Then click deploy.


  2. Click on settings to go to the admin panel for your new backend.  Under "Authentication / Authoirzation" select "Open (for development use only)" and save the changes.


  3. Next, download the Android client project and open it up in your Android IDE. Locate the Consts.java file and set the PROJECT_ID to the Project ID you created in the Google Cloud Console.


  4. Now just build and run the Android application and you have a cloud enabled Android application


Check out the complete docs for details on setup and to find out how to enable authentication, send push notifications, and use standing queries.



The best part is you can download the complete source code of the backend on GitHub and customize it to meet your needs.

See Mobile Backend Starter in action at Google I/O

To see Mobile Backend Starter in action, check out our talk at Google I/O 2013 (embedded below) called "From Nothing to Nirvana in Minutes: Cloud Backend for Your Android Application." The talk shows how to use Mobile Backend Starter to create a new backend server and integrate it with an Android app via Google Cloud Endpoints and the Google Plugin for Eclipse.







We look forward to hearing your questions and learning about the amazing applications you have built. You can find us lurking on the Cloud Endpoints StackOverflow forum.



- Posted by Brad Abrams, Product Manager
URL: http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.com/2013/06/get-your-mobile-application-in-the-cloud-with-mobile-backend-starter.html

[Gd] Bootstrap Your App's Cloud Services with Mobile Backend Starter

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Android Developers Blog: Bootstrap Your App's Cloud Services with Mobile Backend Starter

Posted by Brad Abrams, Product Manager, Google Cloud Platform

Many of the best mobile app experiences are powered by services in the cloud. Top Android developers such as Pulse and SongPop have long taken advantage of the convenience and scalability of Google's cloud platform in their businesses. Now with the Mobile Backend Starter, it's even easier to add cloud services to your apps.



Mobile Backend Starter


Mobile Backend Starter is a one-click deployable, complete mobile backend that allows you to reap the benefits of a cloud backend with none of the headaches. It provides a ready-to-deploy, general purpose cloud backend and a general purpose client-side framework for Android.



Mobile Backend Starter gives you everything you need to rapidly set up a backend for your app, without needing to write any backend code. It includes a server that stores your data with App Engine and a client library and sample app for Android that make it easy to access that data. You can also add support for Google Cloud Messaging (GCM) and continuous queries that notify your app of events you are interested in. To keep user data secure, Mobile Backend Starter also includes built-in support for Google Authentication.





Features of Mobile Backend Starter include:




  • Cloud data storage: Users change devices and increasingly use multiple devices. Store any amount of data per user in the cloud to be accessed from anywhere.

  • Pub/Sub messaging: Send messages from one device, to any or all other devices. You can easily use 1:1 and 1:many messaging as well as broadcasting. This feature is useful for various applications including social apps, forums, chat, gaming, and group collaborations.

  • Push notifications: Data updated on one device is automatically available on all devices with GCM for Android.

  • Continuous queries: Create queries that run continuously on the server, automatically feeding updates to the client. These queries are powered by Prospective Search.

  • Google authentication and authorization: Keep data isolated per user or shared among users.

  • Free to get started, scales with your needs: You can start by handling hundreds of users for free, then grow to any scale.



Quick setup and integration



You can set up and run the Mobile Backend Starter in just few steps:




  1. First, go to the Google Cloud Console, and create a project. Then click Deploy.

  2. Click on Settings to go to the admin control panel for your new backend. Under Authentication / Authorization, select "Open (for development use only)" and save the changes.



  3. Next, download the Android client project and open it up in your Android IDE. Locate the Consts.java file and set the PROJECT_ID to the Project ID of the project you created in the Google Cloud Console.

  4. Now just build and run the Android application and you have a cloud enabled Android application.



Check out the complete docs for details on setup as well as information on how to enable authentication, send push notifications, and use standing queries.



The best part is you can download the complete source code of the backend on GitHub and customize it however you want to meet your needs.



See Mobile Backend Starter in action at Google I/O



To see Mobile Backend Starter in action, check out our talk at Google I/O 2013 (embedded below) called "From Nothing to Nirvana in Minutes: Cloud Backend for Your Android Application". The talk shows how to use Mobile Backend Starter to create a new backend server and integrate it with an Android app via Google Cloud Endpoints and the Google Plugin for Eclipse.



We look forward to hearing your questions and learning about the amazing applications you have built. You can find us lurking on the Cloud Endpoints StackOverflow forum.







URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/06/bootstrap-your-apps-cloud-services-with.html

[Gd] Chrome for iOS Update

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Chrome Releases: Chrome for iOS Update

The Chrome team is excited to announce Chrome 27 for iPhone and iPad. Chrome 27.0.1453.10 contains a number of new features including:
  • Improved voice search
    • Say what you want and get results back without typing
    • Faster voice recognition with text streamed on the fly
    • Get answers spoken back to you with web results tailored to your questions
  • Faster page reloading
    • Pages reload faster even when the network is slow or unavailable
  • Stability / security improvements and bug fixes
The update will be rolling out in the App Store over the next few hours. Known issues are available on the Chrome support site. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/06/chrome-for-ios-update.html