Saturday, May 18, 2013

[Gd] Admin SDK and Google+ APIs for business

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Google Apps Developer Blog: Admin SDK and Google+ APIs for business

Every day, millions of businesses, schools and government agencies rely on Google Apps to get their work done. And each of these organizations has an administrator (or a team of admins) responsible for tasks like creating new accounts, managing mobile devices, and specifying exactly which products and features their employees can use.

Today, we're announcing the Admin SDK, which enables developers to build customized administrative tools for organizations that use Google Apps. The new Admin SDK consolidates many of the existing domain APIs into a new uniform structure and introduces new functionality with the Directory API and Reports API. We’re starting to pilot Google+ Domains API.

Directory API

The new Directory API provides a simple, RESTful interface to support all basic operations required to query & manage users, groups, organizational units, Chromebooks and mobile devices.

Reports API

The new Reports API gives developers a consolidated view of reporting and auditing for domains. Developers can build applications that can monitor and search across usage statistics and activities within a domain.

Google+ Domains API

Businesses are using Google+ to help employees collaborate more easily and get things done. Developers will soon be able to auto-provision Circles, read/write posts, and more from the new APIs. Let us know if you're interested in learning more about this API when it's available.

To begin using the Admin SDK follow the instructions in the API documentation. You will need to sign in to the Google APIs Console and activate the Admin SDK. If you have any questions, join the conversation at Stack Overflow.

Note about API deprecation:
With the introduction of the Directory and Reporting APIs in the new Admin SDK the following APIs will be deprecated per their standard deprecation policy: Google Apps Profiles, Provisioning, Admin Audit, Reporting, Reporting Visualization.

Ajay Guwalani  

Ajay Guwalani is Product Manager on Google Apps Admin APIs. His current focus is to build next generation admin APIs to make enterprise developers and admins happy.




URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2013/05/admin-sdk-and-google-apis-for-business.html

[Gd] Introducing Actions in the Inbox, powered by schemas

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Google Apps Developer Blog: Introducing Actions in the Inbox, powered by schemas

Search engines have been using structured data for years to understand the information on web pages and provide richer search results. Today, we are introducing schemas in emails to make messages more interactive and allow developers to deliver a slice of their apps to users’ inboxes.

Schemas in emails can be used to represent various types of entities and actions. Email clients that understand schemas, such as Gmail, can render entities and actions defined in the messages with a consistent user interface. In the case of Gmail, this means that the emails can display quick action buttons that let users take actions directly from their inboxes, as in the following screenshot:

Using schemas to add quick action buttons to the emails you send is easy. All it takes is adding some markup to your HTML emails, together with your regular content, in one of the supported formats - Microdata and JSON-LD.

As an example, the following JSON-LD markup can be used to define a movie and the corresponding one-click action to add the movie to your queue:


<script type="application/ld+json">
{
"@context": "schema.org",
"@type": "Movie",
"name": "The Internship",
... information about the movie ...
"action": {
"@type": "ConfirmAction",
"name": "Add to queue",
"actionHandler": {
"@type": "HttpActionHandler",
"url": "https://my-movies.com/add?movieId=123",
"method": "POST",
}
}
}
</script>

Gmail renders the markup above with a button labelled “Add to queue” next to the email subject line. When the user clicks on the button, Gmail sends a POST request to the url specified in the action handler. Your app has to handle these requests and respond to the email client with an appropriate HTTP response code (200 for successful requests, 400 for invalid requests, etc.).

Schemas in emails currently support four different types of actions - rate/review, RSVP, one-click action and goto link - and we plan to add more types moving forward. We are collaborating with a number of partners who will launch their integrations in the coming weeks, making the messages they send more useful and interactive for Gmail users. For example, Esna is using this to inform users of missed calls and provide them with a one-click button to be called again, while Seamless is implementing the rate/review action to collect feedback about restaurants.

Other partners who are already implementing schemas in email today include both Billguard, Concur Technologies, Docusign, HelloSign, Insight.ly, Mailchimp, myERP, Netflix, OpenTable, Orangescape, Paperless Post, Spotify, SugarCRM, and Tripit.

To learn more about all supported entities and actions and to find out how to get started with schemas in email, visit http://developers.google.com/gmail.

Claudio Cherubino   profile | twitter | blog

Claudio is an engineer in the Google Drive Developer Relations team. Prior to Google, he worked as software developer, technology evangelist, community manager, consultant, technical translator and has contributed to many open-source projects. His current interests include Google APIs, new technologies and coffee.

URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2013/05/introducing-actions-in-inbox-powered-by.html

[Gd] New Apps Script features at Google I/O—again!

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Google Apps Developer Blog: New Apps Script features at Google I/O—again!

This Wednesday is the start of our annual developer conference, Google I/O, and we can’t wait to share a bunch of new features that will help developers do more with Apps Script. So let’s not wait! Check out these new features launching today:

Scripts in Google Docs

Many of you have told us that you want to be able to extend Google Docs just like Google Sheets, with custom menus, dialogs, and triggers. Starting today, you can do just that (plus custom sidebars, too). To learn more about Apps Script in Docs—including a couple of secret features that we can’t tell you about yet!—please tune into the live stream with me and Jonathan Rascher on Thursday at 3:30pm PT.



Forms Service / Scripts in Google Forms

In response to another top request, you can now use the Forms Service to programmatically create and modify Google Forms, including triggers and a better way to respond to form submissions. (We’ve created a new 5-minute quickstart to get you going.) You can also extend the Google Forms editor with the same custom menus, dialogs, and sidebars as Google Docs. If you’re at I/O, learn how to build Forms with Apps Script by joining Eric Koleda and Matthew Ziegelbaum on Wednesday at 1:55pm PT.

Drive Service

For those of you who use the DocsList Service to automate your Google Drive, a newer version is now available. Drive Service comes with new features like setting the owner of a file or folder or changing the sharing settings. We designed the new service from the ground up to make it easier to work with large numbers of files and also fixed a lot of bugs. If you’re at I/O, Arun Nagarajan and John McGowan will give you more insight into Drive integration on Thursday at 1:40pm PT.

Faster HtmlService

At Google I/O 2012, we launched HtmlService to let you build custom user interfaces with secure client-side scripting. Starting today, you can enable an experimental version of the client-side sandbox that runs significantly faster in any browser that supports ECMAScript 5 strict mode.

Improved Authorization Flow and API Console Integration

You’ve also told us that authorizing a script takes too many steps. Now, you can opt in to an experimental new authorization flow that requires fewer clicks. In addition, every script that uses the new flow automatically creates a project in the Google APIs Console. This makes it much easier to use Google APIs that aren’t built in to Apps Script. To upgrade a script to the new flow, select File > Upgrade authorization experience. If you’re at I/O, Arun Nagarajan and Christoph Schwab-Ganser will demonstrate the new flow in their session on using the YouTube Analytics API with Apps Script on Wednesday at 1:55pm PT.

As you can see, we’ve been working hard to improve Apps Script for you. We hope you enjoy the new features!

Saurabh Gupta   profile | twitter | blog

As the product manager for Google Apps Script, Saurabh is responsible for Apps Script’s overall vision and direction.

URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2013/05/new-apps-script-features-at-google.html

Friday, May 17, 2013

[Gd] New Ways to Optimize Your Business in Google Play

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Android Developers Blog: New Ways to Optimize Your Business in Google Play

Posted by Ellie Powers, Google Play team




This week at I/O, we were excited to announce some updates to Google Play to help you optimize your business on Google Play: to help you take control of your app publishing, gain insight into your users, and expand your app’s success globally.





Play Store’s new view: apps designed for tablets



Many of you have invested in making great tablet experiences for your users, and we want to ensure that that work pays off and that users are able to discover great apps for their tablets. This week, the Google Play store began providing a view of our top charts highlighting apps which have been designed for tablets according to our tablet app quality checklist.



Be sure you don’t miss out! Check that your app’s optimization tips say that your app is designed for tablets, and upload tablet screenshots for 7” and 10” tablets.



Beta testing and staged rollouts


We have introduced support for beta testing and staged rollouts so that you can get feedback on your new app or app update early in its development and make sure your users are happy with the results. You can test two different versions on two different groups at the same time, such as testing a newer version with your employees first, and a more mature version with a group of external testers.



The beta testing is private on Google Play, and you can specify who gets these versions by adding Google Groups and Google+ Communities. Users give you feedback privately rather than through public reviews. When you’re satisfied that your new version is ready, you can now do a staged rollout to a percentage of your userbase. To give you more flexibility in light of beta testing and help get your whole team involved in the Developer Console, we will soon launch additional access controls.





Localization improvements


We’re collaborating with Google's internationalization team to make translating your app into new languages easier than ever. You can purchase professional translations of your apps from independent providers through the Google Play Developer Console. You can upload the strings you want translated, select the languages you want to translate into, and select your translation vendor based on time and price. If you’re interested in translating your apps with this feature, sign up to be a part of the preview in the Developer Console today on the APK page.



The new optimization tips for localization will help you identify new potential opportunities for global expansion based on popular languages for your app’s users and category. To fully localize your app into a language, you need to translate the strings in an APK, translate your Google Play store listing, and upload localized graphics. The optimization tips will also let you know if you’re missing any of these pieces.





New Analytics and monetization features


Getting better revenue and engagement data has been another key developer request, as developers told us that they check their revenue and stats constantly. New revenue charts in the Developer Console allow you to see your app’s daily revenue and summary figures, and you can filter the data by country. Coming soon, Google Play and Google Analytics are teaming up to bring you better insight into your users. Google Analytics will start showing Google Play views and installs for each campaign, while Google Play will show Google Analytics engagement metrics.





For those of you using in-app billing, we’ve heard your feedback and made some improvements to reduce your development time and costs. Your test accounts will now able to make in-app test purchases without those transactions actually being charged, but everything else works the same as it would for a real user.



In a few weeks, we will launch a new Order Status API, which allows you to verify the status of an in-app order from your servers. We will also be launching a tool for automating downloads of financial reports. Finally, the new Google Wallet Merchant Center is continuing to roll out with enhanced reporting, additional analytics and many other enhancements.



Google Play for Education coming soon


You'll soon be able to offer apps to schools through Google Play for Education, which launches later this year to K-12 schools in the United States. This online destination will allow schools to discover, purchase, and distribute apps to their students. Visit developer.android.com/edu to get started creating or optimizing your apps for schools today.





URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/05/new-ways-to-optimize-your-business-in.html

[Gd] Get started with App Engine for PHP: scalable, secure and reliable

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Google Developers Blog: Get started with App Engine for PHP: scalable, secure and reliable

Author PhotoBy Andrew Jessup, Product Manager

Cross-posted from the Google Cloud Platform Blog

At Google I/O, we announced PHP as the latest supported runtime for Google App Engine in Limited Preview. PHP is one of the world's most popular programming languages, used by developers to power everything from simple web forms to complex enterprise applications.

Now PHP developers can take advantage of the scale, reliability and security features of App Engine. In addition, PHP runs well with other parts of Google Cloud Platform. Let's look at how this works.

Connecting to Google Cloud SQL from App Engine for PHP

Many PHP developers start with MySQL when choosing a database to store critical information, and a wide variety of products and frameworks such as Wordpress make extensive use of MySQL’s rich feature set. Google Cloud SQL provides a reliable, managed database service that is MySQL 5.5 compatible and works well with App Engine.

To set up a Cloud SQL database, sign into Google Cloud Console - create a new project, choose Cloud SQL and create a new instance.



After you create the instance, it's automatically associated with your App Engine app.


You will notice Cloud SQL instances don’t need an IP address. Instead they can be accessed via a compound identifier made up of their project name and instance name, such as hello-php-gae:my-cloudsql-instance.

From within PHP, you can access Cloud SQL directly using the standard PHP MySQL libraries - mysql, mysqli or PDO_MySQL. Just specify your Cloud SQL database with its identifier, such as:
query('SELECT * FROM users') as $row) {
echo $row['username'].' '.$row['first_name']; //etc...
}
Methods such as query() work just as you’d expect with any MySQL database. This example uses the popular PDO library, although other libraries such as mysql and mysqli work just as well.

Storing files with PHP and Google Cloud Storage

Reading and writing files is a common task in many PHP projects, whether you are reading stored application state, or generating formatted output (e.g., writing PDF files). The challenge is to find a storage system that is as scalable and secure as Google App Engine itself. Fortunately, we have exactly this in Google Cloud Storage (GCS).

The first step in setting up Google Cloud Storage is to create a bucket:


With the PHP runtime, we’ve implemented native support for GCS. In particular, we’ve made it possible for PHP’s native filesystem functions to read and write to a GCS bucket.

This code writes all prime numbers less than 2000 into a file on GCS:

sqrt($i)) {
fwrite($handle, ", ".$i);
break;
}
$j++;
}
}

fclose($handle);
The same fopen() and fwrite() commands are used just as if you were writing to a local file. The difference is we’ve specified a Google Cloud Storage URL instead of a local filepath.

And this code reads the same file back into memory and pulls out the 100th prime number, using file_get_contents():

$primes = explode(",",
file_get_contents('gs://hello-php-gae-files/prime_numbers.txt')
);

if(isset($primes[100]))
echo "The 100th prime number is ".$primes[100];
And more features supported in PHP

Many of our most popular App Engine APIs are now supported in PHP, including our zero-configuration Memcache, Task Queues for asynchronous processing, Users API, Mail API and more. The standard features you’d expect from App Engine, including SSL support, Page Speed Service, versioning and traffic splitting are all available as well.

Open today in Limited Preview

Today we’re making App Engine for PHP available in Limited Preview. Read more about the runtime in our online documentation, download an early developer SDK, and sign up to deploy applications at https://cloud.google.com/appengine/php.


Andrew Jessup is a Product Manager at Google, working on languages and runtimes for Google App Engine.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/05/get-started-with-app-engine-for-php.html

Thursday, May 16, 2013

[Gd] Social Gaming, Location, and More in Google Play Services

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Android Developers Blog: Social Gaming, Location, and More in Google Play Services

Posted by Greg Hartrell, Angana Ghosh, Francesco Nerieri, Francis Ma, and the Google Play services team


Some of the most exciting Android announcements at Google I/O this year are part of our latest Google Play services release, version 3.1.



The new version brings you Google Play games services, part of a new cloud-integrated platform for social gaming based on Google+ identity. Also included are location-based services that make it easier to build efficient location-aware apps. For apps using the popular Google Cloud Messaging platform, you can now take advantage of XMPP messaging and easier setup. Finally, Cross-Platform Single Sign On for Google+ Sign-In is now available to your apps.



You can get started using these APIs and services right away—Google Play services 3.1 is already rolling out to Android devices across the world, with support reaching all the way back to Froyo.



Google Play games services






Games are always popular with Android developers, and the announcement of Google Play game services raised the volume even more.



Google Play games services lets you make your games more social, with achievements, leaderboards, and multiplayer, and they help you extend your user’s games across multiple devices by storing game saves and settings in the cloud.



Several great Android games are already using these new game services, including World of Goo, Super Stickman Golf 2, Beach Buggy Blitz, Kingdom Rush, Eternity Warriors 2, and Osmos.



You can take advantage of the new services right away using the games services SDK included in Google Play services. For all the details, check out the Google Play games services documentation.






Location APIs



If you build location-aware Android apps, you’ll want to check out the new location APIs. They make it easy to build accurate, fast, and efficient apps, with new contextual features.




The Fused Location Provider intelligently manages the underlying location technology and gives you the best location according to your needs. We’ve simplified the location APIs and completely rewritten our location algorithm to make location more accurate, flexible and use less battery.



Using the new geofencing API, your app can set up geographic boundaries around specific locations and then receive notifications when the user enters the leaves those areas.



With apps becoming increasingly contextual, understanding what the user is doing is critical to surfacing the right content. A new activity recognition API makes it easy to check the the user’s current activity — still, walking, cycling, and in-vehicle — with very efficient use of the battery. We use low-power sensors and machine-learning classifiers to recognize the activity, giving you both both high accuracy and low battery usage.



To learn more, head over to our training classes at Making Your App Location Aware or dive directly into the reference docs.



Google Cloud Messaging



We’ve added APIs to make it easier to set up GCM in your apps, and in the service itself we’ve added new messaging capabilities for your apps to use.



A new registration API lets your app register with the service using a single method call and begin receiving messages as soon as the call returns.





Sign Up for Early Access


If you’d like to try out CCS messaging or the User Notifications API, please sign up for early access.





In the GCM service itself we’ve added support for messaging over XMPP with the new GCM Cloud Connection Server (CCS). Your servers now have a persistent connection over which to send large numbers of messages, very quickly, and with no overhead. New APIs in Google Play services let apps send messages back upstream to third-party servers using CCS, without needing to manage network connections. This helps keep battery and data usage to a minimum.



Also new in the GCM service is a User Notifications API. This new API lets you synchronize notifications across a user’s multiple devices — when the user dismisses a notification on one device, the notification disappears automatically from all the other devices. To get started with GCM, head over to the developer documentation.




Google+ Cross-Platform Single Sign On



Many people use apps on multiple devices throughout the day, switching between their laptops, tablets, and mobile devices. After signing-in to an app on one device, it’s natural that when they pick up a different device and use the same app, they would expect to be signed in there as well.



To help you provide this kind of seamless transition between platforms and stay connected with users across devices, we’re adding Cross-Platform Single Sign On to our Google+ Sign-In capabilities.



If your app is already using Google+ Sign-In, you’ve already got support for Cross-Platform Single Sign On. This feature will be enabled automatically over the coming days.



Cross-Platform Single Sign On gives you a great way to build longer-running, cross-platform user experiences, and it dovetails perfectly with the new Google Play games services for bridging game state across devices using the cloud.



To learn more about Google+ Sign-In, check out http://developers.google.com/+.



More About Google Play Services



Google Play Services is our platform for offering you better integration with Google products, and providing new capabilities to use within your apps. To learn more about Google Play services and the APIs available to you through it, visit the Google Services area of the Android Developers site.



URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/05/social-gaming-location-and-more-in.html

[Gd] Using schema.org markup for organization logos

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Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Using schema.org markup for organization logos

Webmaster level: all

Today, we’re launching support for the schema.org markup for organization logos, a way to connect your site with an iconic image. We want you to be able to specify which image we use as your logo in Google search results.

Using schema.org Organization markup, you can indicate to our algorithms the location of your preferred logo. For example, a business whose homepage is www.example.com can add the following markup using visible on-page elements on their homepage:

<div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization">
<a itemprop="url" href="http://www.example.com/">Home</a>
<img itemprop="logo" src="http://www.example.com/logo.png" />
</div>

This example indicates to Google that this image is designated as the organization’s logo image for the homepage also included in the markup, and, where possible, may be used in Google search results. Markup like this is a strong signal to our algorithms to show this image in preference over others, for example when we show Knowledge Graph on the right hand side based on users’ queries.

As always, please ask us in the Webmaster Help Forum if you have any questions.

Posted by RJ Ryan, Google Engineer
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2013/05/using-schemaorg-markup-for-organization.html

[Gd] Get started with Google Cloud Datastore - a fast, powerful, NoSQL database

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Google Developers Blog: Get started with Google Cloud Datastore - a fast, powerful, NoSQL database

Author Photo
By Chris Ramsdale, Product Manager

Cross-posted from the Google Cloud Platform Blog

At Google I/O, we announced Google Cloud Datastore, a fully managed solution for storing non-relational data. Based on the popular Google App Engine High Replication Datastore (HRD), Cloud Datastore provides a schemaless, non-relational datastore with the same accessibility of Google Cloud Storage and Google Cloud SQL.

Cloud Datastore builds off the strong growth and performance of HRD, which has over 1PB of data stored, 4.5 trillion transactions per month and a 99.95% uptime. It also comes with the following features:
  • Built-in query support: near SQL functionality that allows you to search, sort and filter across multiple indexes that are automatically maintained 
  • ACID transactions: data consistency (both Strong and Eventual) that spans multiple replicas and requests 
  • Automatic scaling: built on top of Google’s BigTable infrastructure, the Cloud Datastore will automatically scale with your data 
  • High availability: by utilizing Google’s underlying Megastore service, the Cloud Datastore ensures that data is replicated across multiple datacenters and is highly available 
  • Local development environment: the Cloud Datastore SDK provides a full-featured local environment that allows you to develop, iterate and manage your Cloud Datastore instances efficiently 
  • Free to get started: 50k read & write operations, 200 indexes, and 1GB of stored data for free per month  

Getting started with Cloud Datastore 

To get started, head over to the Google Cloud Console and create a new project. After supplying a few pieces of information you will have a Cloud Project that has the Cloud Datastore enabled by default. For this post we’ll use the project ID cloud-demo.

With the project created and the Cloud Datastore enabled, we’ll need to download the Cloud Datastore SDK. Once extracted, it’s time to start writing some code. For the sake of this post, we’ll focus on accessing the Cloud Datastore from a Python application running on a Compute Engine VM (which is also now in Preview). We’ll assume that you’ve already created a new VM instance.'
import datastore

def main()
writeEntity();
readEntity();
Next include writeEntity() and readEntity() methods:
def WriteEntity():
req = datastore.BlindWriteRequest()
entity = req.mutation.upsert.add()
path = entity.key.path_element.add()
path.kind = 'Greeting'
path.name = 'foo'
message = entity.property.add()
message.name = 'message'
value = message.value.add()
value.string_value = 'to the cloud and beyond!'
try:
datastore.blind_write(req)
except datastore.RPCError as e:
# remember to do something useful with the exception

def ReadEntity():
req = datastore.LookupRequest()
key = req.key.add()
path = key.path_element.add()
path.kind = 'Greeting0'
path.name = 'foo0'
try:
resp = datastore.lookup(req)
return resp
except datastore.RPCError as e:
# remember to do something useful with the exception
First create a new file called “demo.py”. Inside demo.py, we’ll add code to write and then read an entity from the Cloud Datastore.  Finally we can update main() to print out the property values within the fetched entity:
def main():
writeEntity();
resp = readEntity();

entity = resp.found[0].entity
for p in entity.property:
print 'Entity property name: %s', p.name
v = p.value[0]
print 'Entity property value: %s', v.string_value
Before we can run this code we need to tell the SDK which Cloud Datastore instance we would like to use. This is done by exporting the following environment variable:
~$export DATASTORE_DATASET: cloud-datastore-demo
Finally we’re able to run the application by simply issuing the following:
~$python demo.py
Besides the output that we see in console window, we’re also able to monitor our interactions within the Cloud Console. By navigating back to Cloud Console, selecting our cloud-datastore-demo project, and then selecting the Cloud Datastore we’re taken to our instance’s dashboard page that includes number of entities, properties, and property types, as well as index management, ad-hoc query support and breakdown of stored data.

And that’s really just the beginning. To fully harness the features and functionality that the Cloud Datastore offers, be sure to check out the larger “Getting Started” guide and the Cloud Datastore documentation.

Cloud Datastore is the latest addition to the Cloud Platform storage family, joining Cloud Storage for storing blob data, Cloud SQL for storing relational data, and Persistent Disk for storing block data. All fully managed so that you can focus on creating amazing solutions and leave the rest to us.

And while this is a Preview Release, the team is off to a great start. As we move the service towards General Availability we’re looking forward to improving JSON support, more deeply integrating with the Cloud Console, streamlining our billing and driving every bit of performance that we can out of the API and underlying service.

Happy coding!


Chris Ramsdale has worked extensively in the mobile space, starting as a Software Engineer at Motorola in 1997, and then joining local start ups as a Tech Lead and Product Manager. Chris is currently a Product Manager for Google Cloud Platform focused on developer tools and platform services like Google App Engine and Google Cloud Datastore.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/05/get-started-with-google-cloud-datastore.html

[Gd] Google Compute Engine is now open to all

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Cloud Platform Blog: Google Compute Engine is now open to all

Last year we announced Google Compute Engine to enable any business or developer to use Google’s infrastructure for their applications. Now we’re taking the next step: Google Compute Engine is open to everyone in preview, and you can sign up online now.



Over the past year, we’ve launched several features and made significant improvements behind the scenes. We’re now announcing several new capabilities that make it easier and more economical to use Compute Engine for a broader set of applications.




  • Sub-Hour Billing: We heard feedback from our early users who wanted more granular billing increments so they could run short-lived workloads. Now all instances are charged for in one-minute increments with a ten-minute minimum, so you don’t pay for compute minutes that you don’t use.

  • New shared-core instance types: Compute Engine’s new micro and small instance types are designed as a cost-effective option for running small workloads that don’t need a lot of CPU power, like development and test workloads.

  • Larger Persistent Disks: We’re increasing the size of Persistent Disks that can be attached to instances by up to 8,000%. You can now attach up to 10 terabytes of persistent disk to a Compute Engine virtual machine, giving you plenty of persistent storage for a wide variety of applications.

  • Advanced Routing Capabilities: Compute Engine now supports software-defined routing capabilities based on our broad SDN innovation. These capabilities are designed to handle your advanced network routing needs like configuring instances to function as gateways, configuring VPN servers and building applications that span your local network and Google’s cloud.

  • ISO 27001 Certification: We’ve also completed ISO 27001:2005 certification for Compute Engine, App Engine, and Cloud Storage to demonstrate that these products meet the international standard for managing information security.




To get started, go to the Google Cloud Console, select Compute Engine and click the “New Instance” button.





Fill out the required information and click “Create” on the right hand side. Your new virtual machine will be ready to use in about a minute.



To all of our customers who helped us evolve the product over the past months, thank you; your feedback has helped shape Compute Engine. To those of you who have been eager to try Compute Engine, the wait is over and you can sign up for Compute Engine online today.



- Posted by Navneet Joneja, Product Manager
URL: http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.com/2013/05/google-compute-engine-is-now-open-to-all.html

[Gd] Ushering in the next generation of computing at Google I/O

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Cloud Platform Blog: Ushering in the next generation of computing at Google I/O

Over the last fourteen years we have been developing some of the best infrastructure in the world to power Google’s global-scale services. With Google Cloud Platform, our goal is to open that infrastructure and make it available to any business or developer anywhere. Today, we are introducing improvements to the platform and making Google Compute Engine available for anyone to use.



Google Compute Engine - now available for everyone



Google Compute Engine provides a fast, consistently high-performance environment for running virtual machines. Later today, you’ll be able to go online to cloud.google.com and start using Compute Engine.



In addition, we’re introducing new Compute Engine features:




  • Sub-hour billing charges for instances in one-minute increments with a ten-minute minimum, so you don’t pay for compute minutes that you don’t use

  • Shared-core instances provide smaller instance shapes for low-intensity workloads

  • Advanced Routing features help you create gateways and VPN servers, and enable you to build applications that span your local network and Google’s cloud

  • Large persistent disks support up to 10 terabytes per volume, which translates to 10X the industry standard




We’ve also completed ISO 27001:2005 international security certification for Compute Engine, Google App Engine, and Google Cloud Storage.



Google App Engine adds the PHP runtime



App Engine 1.8.0 is now available and includes a Limited Preview of the PHP runtime - your top requested feature. We’re bringing one of the most popular web programming languages to App Engine so that you can run open source apps like Wordpress. It also offers deep integration with other parts of Cloud Platform including Google Cloud SQL and Cloud Storage.



We’ve also heard that we need to make building modularized applications on App Engine easier. We are introducing the ability to partition apps into components with separate scaling, deployments, versioning and performance settings.



Introducing Google Cloud Datastore



Google Cloud Datastore is a fully managed and schemaless solution for storing non-relational data. Based on the popular App Engine High Replication Datastore, Cloud Datastore is a standalone service that features automatic scalability and high availability while still providing powerful capabilities such as ACID transactions, SQL-like queries, indexes and more.



Over the last year we have continued our focus on feature enhancement and developer experience across App Engine, Compute Engine, Google BigQuery, Cloud Storage and Cloud SQL. We also introduced Google Cloud Endpoints and Google Cloud Console.



With these improvements, we have seen increased usage with over 3 million applications and over 300,000 unique developers using Cloud Platform in a given month. Our developers inspire us everyday, and we can’t wait to see what you build next.



-Posted by Urs Hölzle, Senior Vice President
URL: http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.com/2013/05/ushering-in-next-generation-of.html

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

[Gd] Google Compute Engine is now open to all

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Google Developers Blog: Google Compute Engine is now open to all

Author Photo
By Navneet Joneja, Product Manager

Cross-posted from the Google Cloud Platform Blog

Last year we announced Google Compute Engine to enable any business or developer to use Google’s infrastructure for their applications. Now we’re taking the next step: Google Compute Engine is open to everyone in preview, and you can sign up online now.

Over the past year, we’ve launched several features and made significant improvements behind the scenes. We’re now announcing several new capabilities that make it easier and more economical to use Compute Engine for a broader set of applications.

  • Sub-Hour Billing: We heard feedback from our early users who wanted more granular billing increments so they could run short-lived workloads. Now all instances are charged for in one-minute increments with a ten-minute minimum, so you don’t pay for compute minutes that you don’t use.
  • New shared-core instance types: Compute Engine’s new micro and small instance types are designed as a cost-effective option for running small workloads that don’t need a lot of CPU power, like development and test workloads.
  • Larger Persistent Disks: We’re increasing the size of Persistent Disks that can be attached to instances by up to 8,000%. You can now attach up to 10 terabytes of persistent disk to a Compute Engine virtual machine, giving you plenty of persistent storage for a wide variety of applications.
  • Advanced Routing Capabilities: Compute Engine now supports software-defined routing capabilities based on our broad SDN innovation. These capabilities are designed to handle your advanced network routing needs like configuring instances to function as gateways, configuring VPN servers and building applications that span your local network and Google’s cloud.
  • ISO 27001 Certification: We’ve also completed ISO 27001:2005 certification for Compute Engine, App Engine, and Cloud Storage to demonstrate that these products meet the international standard for managing information security.

To get started, go to the Google Cloud Console, select Compute Engine and click the “New Instance” button.

Fill out the required information and click “Create” on the right hand side. Your new virtual machine will be ready to use in about a minute.

To all of our customers who helped us evolve the product over the past months, thank you; your feedback has helped shape Compute Engine. To those of you who have been eager to try Compute Engine, the wait is over and you can sign up for Compute Engine online today.


Navneet Joneja loves being at the forefront of the next generation of simple and reliable software infrastructure, the foundation on which next-generation technology is being built. When not working, he can usually be found dreaming up new ways to entertain his intensely curious three-year-old.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/05/google-compute-engine-is-now-open-to-all.html

[Gd] Cross-Platform SSO technology

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Google Developers Blog: Cross-Platform SSO technology

Author Photo
By Tim Bray, Google Identity Team

During the Android portion of the Google I/O keynote, we showed Cross-Platform Single Sign-On; the effect was that for Wallet and Google+ users, signing in to a Web browser resulted in automatic download of, and sign-in to, an Android app.

To support this, we have introduced general-purpose API tools which allow developers to achieve cross-client authentication and authorization, in particular between Android and Web apps.

Not having to sign in repeatedly feels so natural for users that they don’t even notice it. But as more and more apps deploy this sort of magic, you don’t want to be the hold-out that’s pestering users for passwords on Web sites or, worse, on tiny mobile-device keyboards.

On the Android side, client libraries like PlusClient, GamesClient, and WalletClient have “connect” methods that take care of this as automatically as possible; they check whether any of the accounts on the phone have already been authorized for access to the service in question, conduct sign-in if necessary but avoid it if possible, and when they return to your code, everything’s all set up.

If you’re writing server-side code and using libraries like Google+ Sign-In, once again, all the right things happen automatically; when you start accessing the service, the software imposes the minimum necessary pain on the user, ideally zero, and lets you get to work.

Of course, some people want less automation, and finer control over how things work. If you want to access our services at the HTTP level rather than via a library, or to deal with multiple accounts on an Android device in a customized way, you can do these things and in most cases still deliver the no-sign-in magic.

Of course, this involves working with HTTP message flows, validating tokens, and securing shared secrets. This may sound intimidating but will be straightforward for one well-versed in HTTP-level Web programming. If you’re one of those, check out the low-level protocols and APIs that support this, in “Cross-Client Identity”.

The time is now to start moving your apps towards a sign-in-free future.


Tim says: By day, I help in the struggle against passwords on the Internet.
The rest of my life is fully documented on my blog.


Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/05/cross-platform-sso-technology.html

[Gd] Ushering in the next generation of computing at Google I/O

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Google Developers Blog: Ushering in the next generation of computing at Google I/O

Author Photo
By Urs Hölzle, Senior Vice President, Technical Infrastructure, and Google Fellow

Cross-posted from the Google Cloud Platform Blog

LIVE - Watch the stream of the Cloud track kickoff now

Over the last fourteen years we have been developing some of the best infrastructure in the world to power Google’s global-scale services. With Google Cloud Platform, our goal is to open that infrastructure and make it available to any business or developer anywhere. Today, we are introducing improvements to the platform and making Google Compute Engine available for anyone to use.

Google Compute Engine - now available for everyone

Google Compute Engine provides a fast, consistently high-performance environment for running virtual machines. Later today, you’ll be able to go online to cloud.google.com and start using Compute Engine.

In addition, we’re introducing new Compute Engine features:

  • Sub-hour billing charges for instances in one-minute increments with a ten-minute minimum, so you don’t pay for compute minutes that you don’t use
  • Shared-core instances provide smaller instance shapes for low-intensity workloads
  • Advanced Routing features help you create gateways and VPN servers, and enable you to build applications that span your local network and Google’s cloud
  • Large persistent disks support up to 10 terabytes per volume, which translates to 10X the industry standard

We’ve also completed ISO 27001:2005 international security certification for Compute Engine, Google App Engine, and Google Cloud Storage.

Google App Engine adds the PHP runtime

App Engine 1.8.0 is now available and includes a Limited Preview of the PHP runtime - your top requested feature. We’re bringing one of the most popular web programming languages to App Engine so that you can run open source apps like Wordpress. It also offers deep integration with other parts of Cloud Platform including Google Cloud SQL and Cloud Storage.

We’ve also heard that we need to make building modularized applications on App Engine easier. We are introducing the ability to partition apps into components with separate scaling, deployments, versioning and performance settings.

Introducing Google Cloud Datastore

Google Cloud Datastore is a fully managed and schemaless solution for storing non-relational data. Based on the popular App Engine High Replication Datastore, Cloud Datastore is a standalone service that features automatic scalability and high availability while still providing powerful capabilities such as ACID transactions, SQL-like queries, indexes and more.

Over the last year we have continued our focus on feature enhancement and developer experience across App Engine, Compute Engine, Google BigQuery, Cloud Storage and Cloud SQL. We also introduced Google Cloud Endpoints and Google Cloud Console.

With these improvements, we have seen increased usage with over 3 million applications and over 300,000 unique developers using Cloud Platform in a given month. Our developers inspire us everyday, and we can’t wait to see what you build next.


Urs Hölzle is Senior Vice President of Technical Infrastructure and Google Fellow. As one of Google's first ten employees and its first VP of Engineering, he has shaped much of Google's development processes and infrastructure.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/05/ushering-in-next-generation-of.html

[Gd] Introducing Google Play game services

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Google Developers Blog: Introducing Google Play game services

Author PhotoBy Greg Hartrell, Lead Product Manager

We love to talk about games at Google. Especially the old ones, like Pac-man, Pitfall and Frogger. Since those classics, games have changed a lot. They’ve moved from that clunky box in your living room to the screen that you carry with you in your pocket wherever you go. They’re mobile, they’re social, and they’re an important part of Google Play.

Today, we’re launching Google Play game services, a core part of building a gaming platform for the next generation of games. These services help you make your games more social, with achievements, leaderboards, and multiplayer, as well as more powerful, storing game saves and settings in the cloud. They are available on Android, and many on iOS or any other connected device. By building on Google’s strengths in mobile and cloud services, you can focus on what you’re good at as game developers: creating great gaming experiences for your users.

With game services, you can incorporate:
  • Achievements that increase engagement and promote different styles of play.
  • Social and public leaderboards that seamlessly use Google+ circles to track high scores across friends and across the world.
  • Cloud saves that provide a simple and streamlined storage API to store game saves and settings. Now players never have to replay Level 1 again.
  • Real-time multiplayer for easy addition of cooperative or competitive game play on Android devices. Using Google+ Circles, a game can have up to 4 simultaneous friends or auto-matched players in a game session together with support for additional players coming soon.



Several great Android games are already using these new game services, including World of Goo, Super Stickman Golf 2, Beach Buggy Blitz, Kingdom Rush, Eternity Warriors 2, and Osmos.

And many more titles launch today as well:



Google Play game services are available today through an SDK for Android, and a native iOS SDK for iPhone and iPad games. Web and other platform developers will also find corresponding REST APIs, with libraries for JavaScript, Java, Python, Go, Dart, PHP, and more.

We’re excited to see what games will do with these new services and experiences, and this is only the beginning. Wait until you get to the boss battle... er.. Check out our developer site to get started: https://developers.google.com/games/.


Greg Hartrell is Lead Product Manager on Google Play game services, devoted to helping developers make incredible games through Google Play. In his spare time, he enjoys jumping from platform to platform, boss battles and matching objects in threes.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/05/introducing-google-play-game-services.html

[Gd] Android Studio: An IDE built for Android

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Android Developers Blog: Android Studio: An IDE built for Android

Posted by Xavier Ducrohet, Tor Norbye, Katherine Chou




Today at Google I/O we announced a new IDE that’s built with the needs of Android developers in mind. It’s called Android Studio, it’s free, and it’s available now for you to try as an early access preview.



To develop Android Studio, we cooperated with JetBrains, creators of one of the most advanced Java IDEs available today. Based on the powerful, extensible IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition, we've added features that are designed specifically for Android development, that simplify and optimize your daily workflow.



Extensible build tools



We know you need a build system that adapts to your project requirements but extends further to your larger development environment. Android Studio uses a new build system based on Gradle that provides flexibility, customized build flavors, dependency resolution and much more.



This new build system allows you to build your projects in the IDE as well as on your continuous integrations servers. The combination lets you easily manage complex build configurations natively, throughout your workflow, across all of your tools. Check out the preview documentation to get a better idea of what the new build can do.





Powerful code editing



Android Studio includes a powerful code editor. It is based on the IntelliJ IDEA, which supports features such as smart editing, advanced code refactoring, and deep static code analysis.



Smart editing features such as inline resource lookups make it easier to read your code, while giving you instant access to edit code the backing resources. Advanced code refactoring gives you the power to transform your code across the scope of the entire project, quickly and safely.



We added static code analysis for Android development, helping you identify bugs more quickly. On top of the hundreds of code inspections that IntelliJ IDEA provides, we’ve added custom inspections. For example, we’ve added metadata to the Android APIs, that flag which methods can return null and which can’t, which constants are allowed for which methods, and so on. Android Studio uses that data to analyze your code and find potential errors.









Smoother and richer GUI



Over the past year we’ve added some great drag-and-drop UI features to ADT and we’re in the process of adding them all into Android Studio. This release of Android Studio lets you preview your layouts on different device form factors, locales, and platform versions. Below you can see a multi-configuration preview side by side XML editing.



Easy access to Google services
within Android Tools



We wanted to make it easy for you to harness the power Google services right from your IDE. To start, we’ve made it trivial to add services such a cloud-based backend with integrated Google Cloud Messaging (GCM) to your app, directly from the IDE.



We’ve also added a new plugin called ADT Translation Manager Plugin to assist with localizing your apps. You can use the plugin to export your strings to the Google Play Developer Console for translation, then download and import your translations back into your project.



Open source development



Starting next week we’ll be doing all of our development in the open, so you can follow along or make your own contributions. You can find the Android Studio project in AOSP at https://android.googlesource.com/platform/tools/adt/idea/




Try Android Studio and give us feedback



Give Android Studio a try and send us your feedback! It's free, and the download bundle includes includes everything you need, including the IDE, the latest SDK tools, the latest Android platform, and more. .



Note: This is an early access preview intended for early adopters and testers who want to influence the direction of the Android tools. If you have a production app with a large installed base, there’s no need to migrate your development to the new tools at this time. We will continue to support Eclipse as a primary platform for development.



If you have feedback on the tools, you can send it to us using the Android Studio issue tracker.










URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/05/android-studio-ide-built-for-android.html

[Gd] Android at Google I/O 2013: Keynote Wrapup

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Android Developers Blog: Android at Google I/O 2013: Keynote Wrapup



The last year has been an exciting one for Android developers, with an incredible amount of momentum. In fact, over 48 billion apps have been downloaded from Google Play to date, with over 2.5 billion app downloads in the last month alone.



This week, at Google I/O, our annual developer conference, we’re celebrating this momentum, and putting on stage a number of new features and advancements both for the Android platform and Google Play, to help you design, develop and distribute great apps to your users.



We just wrapped up the keynote, and wanted to share a number of those new features; we’ll be spotlighting some of them throughout the week both here, on Google+, and in 36 Android sessions and sandboxes at the Moscone center in San Francisco (with many of the sessions livestreamed at developer.google.com). Enjoy!



Google Play Services 3.1



Google Play Services is our platform for bringing you easier integration with Google products and new capabilities to use in your apps. Today we announced a new version of Google Play Services that has some great APIs for developers.




  • Google Play games services give you great new social features that you can add to your games   achievements, leaderboards, cloud save, and real-time multiplayer

  • Location APIs make it easy to add location- and context-awareness to your apps through a fused location provider, geofencing, and activity recognition

  • Google Cloud Messaging enhancements let you use bidirectional XMPP messaging between server and devices and dismiss notifications

  • Cross-Platform Single Sign On, which lets your users sign in once, for all of their devices using Google+ Sign-In.



Android Studio: A new IDE for Android development



Today we announced a new Integrated Development Environment (IDE) built just for Android, with the needs of Android developers in mind. It’s called Android Studio, it’s free, and it’s available now to try as an early access preview.



To build Android Studio, we worked with with JetBrains, creators of one of the most advanced Java IDEs available today. Based on the powerful, extensible IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition, we've added features and capabilities that are designed specifically for Android development, to simplify and optimize your daily workflow for creating Android apps.



Google Play Developer Console: a better distribution experience



Building awesome Android apps is only part of the story. Today we announced great new features in the Google Play Developer Console that give you more control over how you distribute your app and insight into how your app is doing:




  • App translation service: a pilot program that lets you purchase professional translations for your app directly from the Developer Console.

  • Revenue graphs: a new tab in the Developer Console gives you a summary of your app global app revenue over time.

  • Alpha and beta testing and staged rollouts: you can now distribute your app to controlled alpha and beta test groups, or do staged rollouts to specific percentages of your userbase.

  • Optimization tips: design your app for tablets and understand how to expand your app into new language markets.

  • Google Analytics: launching later this summer, your Google Analytics usage stats will be viewable right in the Developer Console.

  • Referral tracking: also launching later this summer, you’ll get a new report in Google Analytics to show what blogs, campaigns, and ads are driving your installs.



Follow the Android Sessions



Join us for the Android sessions today and through the week by livestream. Visit the I/O Live Stream schedule for details.

URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/05/android-at-google-io-2013-keynote-wrapup.html

[Gd] Flash Player Update

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Chrome Releases: Flash Player Update

We are currently updating Flash Player to 11.7.700.202 for Windows and Mac to all Stable channel (Chrome 26) users.

If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Anthony LaforgeGoogle Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/05/flash-player-update.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 28.0.1500.11 (Platform versions: 4100.7.0) for all platforms except Google Chromebook Pixel. This build contains a number of stability improvements.

Release Highlights:

  • Fixed several issues where File Manager panes were displayed blank. (239152239155)
  • Improved trackpad performance on Cr-48 systems (238778)
  • Fix to allow formatting a USB drive from the File Manager (239120)
  • Fix to allow viewing content of external storage (236743)
  • Updated Pepper Flash version to 11.7.700.202-r4

Known Issues:
  • With Acer C7 Chromebooks, when the system is connected to an external monitor and used in docked mode, the CPU usage goes to 100%. 
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Danielle Drew
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/05/dev-channel-update-for-chrome-os_14.html

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

[Gd] Data Sensing Lab at Google I/O 2013: Google Cloud Platform meets the Internet of Things

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Cloud Platform Blog: Data Sensing Lab at Google I/O 2013: Google Cloud Platform meets the Internet of Things

Cross-posted with the Google Developers Blog



After last year's Google I/O conference, the Google Cloud Platform Developer Relations team started to think about how attendees experienced the event. We wanted to help attendees gain more insight about the conference space and the environment itself. Which developer Sandboxes were the busiest? Which were the loudest locations, and which were the best places to take a quick nap? We think about data problems all the time, and this looked like an interesting big data challenge that we could try to solve. So this year, we decided to try to answer our questions with a project that's a bit different, kind of futuristic, and maybe a little crazy.



Since we love open source hardware hacking as much as we love to share open source code, we decided to team up with the O'Reilly Data Sensing Lab to deploy hundreds of Arduino-based environmental sensors at Google I/O 2013. Using software built with the Google Cloud Platform, we'll be collecting and visualizing ambient data about the conference, such as temperature, humidity, air quality, in real time! Altogether, the sensors network will provide over 4,000 continuous data streams over a ZigBee mesh network managed by Device Cloud by Etherios.



photo of sensors



In addition, our motes will be able to detect fluctuations in noise level, and some will be attached to footstep counters, to understand collective movement around the conference floor. Of course, since a key goal of Google I/O is to promote innovation in the open, the project's Cloud Platform code, the Arduino hardware designs, and even the data collected, will be open source and available online after the conference.



Google Cloud Platform, which provides the software backend for this project, has a variety of features for building applications that collect and process data from a large number of client devices - without having to spend time managing hardware or infrastructure. Google App Engine Datastore, along with Google Cloud Endpoints, provides a scalable front end API for collecting data from devices. Google Compute Engine is used to process and analyse data with software tools you may already be familiar with, such as R and Hadoop. Google BigQuery provides fast aggregate analysis of terabyte datasets. Finally, App Engine's web application framework is able to surface interactive visualizations to users.



Networked sensor technology is in the early stages of revolutionizing business logistics, city planning, and consumer products. We are looking forward to sharing the Data Sensing Lab with Google I/O attendees, because we want to show how using open hardware together with the Google Cloud Platform can make this technology accessible to anyone.



With the help of the Google Maps DevRel team, we'll be displaying visualizations of interesting trends on several screens around the conference. Members of the Data Sensing Lab will be on hand in the Google I/O Cloud Sandbox to show off prototypes and talk to attendees about open hardware development. Lead software developer Amy Unruh and Kim Cameron from the Cloud Platform Developer Relations team will talk about how we built the software involved in this project in a talk called "Behind the Data Sensing Lab". In case you aren't able to attend Google I/O 2013, this session will be available online after the conference. Learn more about the Google Cloud Platform on our site, and to dive in to building applications, check out our developer documentation.



-Posted by Michael Manoochehri, Developer Programs Engineer

URL: http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.com/2013/05/data-sensing-lab-at-google-io-2013.html

Monday, May 13, 2013

[Gd] Dev Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update

The Dev channel has been updated to 28.0.1500.11 for Chrome Frame, Mac, Linux, and Windows

This build addresses some known regressions and stability issues. Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how.

If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Anthony Laforge
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/05/dev-channel-update_13.html