Saturday, April 27, 2013

[Gd] Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to 27.0.1453.69 (Platform version: 3912.43.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a number of bug fixes and stability improvements.
 
Some highlights of these changes are:

  • Pepper Flash updated to 11.7.700.178
  • Stability fixes
Known issues:
  • Dragging the video control in html5 mode may hang (232175)
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/04/beta-channel-update-for-chrome-os_25.html

[Gd] Chrome Beta for Android Update

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Chrome Releases: Chrome Beta for Android Update

Chrome Beta for Android has been updated to 27.0.1453.68. This release contains new fixes including:
  • 179250: Black screen during load on Huawei tablets
  • 224379: Cannot scroll images after zooming in
  • 226193: Blue line displayed below the omnibox
  • Improvement to page rendering performance
  • Fixes for some frequently occurring crashes
Known Issues:
  • Embedded videos may be jittery on ICS devices
  • Typed character gets deleted sometimes on password fields
  • Opening tabs is sometimes slow
A partial list of changes in this build is available in the SVN revision log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/04/chrome-beta-for-android-update_25.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update


The Beta channel has been updated to 27.0.1453.65 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Karen Grunberg
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/04/beta-channel-update_24.html

[Gd] Chrome for iOS Update

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Chrome Releases: Chrome for iOS Update

Chrome for iOS has been updated to 26.0.1410.53 which contains security and stability fixes. The update will be rolling out in the App Store over the next few hours.  Known issues are available on the Chrome support site. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/04/chrome-for-ios-update_24.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS - UPDATED

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS - UPDATED


*****Update Apr 26*****
Good news! We've found the problem that prevented users on 4035.0.0 on some platforms from accessing Google Docs. We're rolling out the fix now to the platforms affected: Chromebook Pixel, Samsung Chromebook Series 5 550, Samsung Chromebox Series 3, and Lenovo Thinkpad X131e Chromebook. Please remember to restart your Chrome OS device in order to be updated to this latest version
*********************

The Dev channel has been updated to 28.0.1485.1 (Platform version: 4035.0.0) for all Chromebooks. This build contains a number of bug fixes and feature enhancements.

Release Highlights:

  • New Immersive browsing mode - browse the web with only 4px of Chrome.
  • Monitor Rotation and Scaling - you can scale your UI smaller on Arrow and rotate the screen on all Chromebooks
  • Touch link highlighting - we now provide feedback on which link you click or button you press.
  • Several improvements to the Files app, such as added support for files that are Shared with me, Offline, and Recent.
  • Notification pop-up message appears when screenshots are taken.

Known Issues:
  • Bluetooth devices shown as not connected while they are connected (234380)
  • Unable to see contents of SD cards or USB devices when connected to the Chromebook (233641)
  • Netflix does not work on Acer AC700 systems.
  • File app not working in Guest/Incognito mode (230724)

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Danielle Drew
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/04/dev-channel-update-for-chrome-os-updated.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update

The Dev channel has been updated to 28.0.1485.0 for Linux, Mac, Windows, and Chrome Frame

This build addresses some known regressions and stability issues. Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how.

If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Karen Grunberg
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/04/dev-channel-update_22.html

[Gd] Fridaygram: Transparency Report, billions of bugs, calming doodle

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Google Developers Blog: Fridaygram: Transparency Report, billions of bugs, calming doodle

Author PhotoBy Scott Knaster, Google Developers Blog Editor

The Google Transparency Report is designed to point out government censorship, requests to Google for data, and other details about our information services. The newest report, just out this week, shows that government requests for content removal have reached a new high level, with more than 2200 requests received in the second half of last year.

Government removal requests are probably the best known part of the Transparency Report, but there’s plenty of other fascinating and useful data. For example, you can see information about removal requests for specific URLs from copyright owners, or read about the legal process that takes place when a government organization or court requests information about a user. You can learn a lot by spending some time with the Transparency Report.

If you’re on the U. S. East Coast this spring and summer, you won’t need a report to tell you that massive numbers of cicadas are emerging from their underground homes to breed, fill the skies, annoy countless humans, last a few weeks, then die (and annoy even more humans who have to clean them up). This year’s bunch are Magicicada septendecim, or periodical cicadas with a 17-year life cycle. So we can look forward to a similar event in 2030.

Finally, if you haven’t already played with the Earth Day Doodle from last Monday, consider taking a few minutes this weekend to enjoy it. You might find yourself mesmerized by the tranquil scene (cicadas not included).


Fridaygram is mostly about fun and informative stuff that’s not related to development, but we seriously want to congratulate Googlers Peter Norvig and Arun Majumdar on their election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Arun runs Google’s energy strategy as vice president of energy, and Peter is our director of research, although he’s also known for his whimsical take on presentations and technology.
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/04/fridaygram-transparency-report-billions.html

Friday, April 26, 2013

[Gd] Speed up your sites with PageSpeed for Nginx

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Google Developers Blog: Speed up your sites with PageSpeed for Nginx

Author Photo
By Jeff Kaufman, Software Engineer, Make the Web Faster Team

When we released mod_pagespeed in 2010, we gave webmasters a way to speed up their sites without needing to become web performance optimization experts. As an Apache module, however, it was unavailable to sites running Nginx, the popular high performing open source web server that powers many large web sites. Today that changes: we're releasing PageSpeed Beta for Nginx, aka ngx_pagespeed.

Running as a module inside Nginx, ngx_pagespeed rewrites your webpages to make them faster for your users. This includes compressing images, minifying CSS and JavaScript, extending cache lifetimes, and many other web performance best practices. All of mod_pagespeed's optimization filters are now available to Nginx users.

ngx_pagespeed logo
After three months of alpha testing on hundreds of sites, ngx_pagespeed has proven its ability to serve production traffic. It's ready for beta, and it's ready for you to start using it on your site.

MaxCDN, a content delivery network provider, recently published a blog post on their experience testing ngx_pagespeed: “With PageSpeed enabled, we shaved 1.57 seconds from our average page load, dropped our bounce rate by 1%, and our exit percentage by 2.5%. In sum, we squeezed out extra performance with nothing but a few extra lines in our nginx config files... We are continuing to test the module with the PageSpeed team, and our goal is to make it available across our CDN and to all of our customers – stay tuned!”

ZippyKid, a popular WordPress hosting provider, is also one of the early beta testers of ngx_pagespeed: “PageSpeed for ZippyKid is the world’s first WordPress optimization service powered by ngx_pagespeed, designed to automatically apply web performance best practices to deliver fast WordPress sites. Our benchmarks indicate that PageSpeed for ZippyKid will deliver up to a 75% reduction in page sizes and a 50% improvement in page rendering speeds.”

Development of ngx_pagespeed is open source, with contributions by developers from Google, Taobao, We-Amp, and many other individual volunteers. Thanks everyone for helping us reach the Beta milestone!

To start using ngx_pagespeed, follow the installation instructions on GitHub.


Jeff Kaufman works on PageSpeed, an open-source server module that helps make the web faster, and is interested in experiment measurement. He also plays for contra dances, organizes other dances, and blogs about dancing, giving, and tech.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/04/speed-up-your-sites-with-pagespeed-for.html

Thursday, April 25, 2013

[Gd] Tablet Optimization Tips in the Google Play Developer Console

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Android Developers Blog: Tablet Optimization Tips in the Google Play Developer Console

Posted by Ellie Powers, Google Play team




Last week we updated our guidelines for making great tablet apps and added the ability to upload tablet screenshots that are shown preferentially in Google Play to users on those devices. Today we’re introducing a new Optimization Tips page in the Google Play Developer Console that lets you quickly see how your app is doing against basic guidelines for tablet app distribution and quality.



When you upload an app, the Developer Console now runs a series of checks to verify basic criteria from the Tablet App Quality Checklist and shows you any issues it finds in the Optimization Tips page.





If you’re developing for tablets, make sure to visit your Optimization Tips page to ensure that your app is delivering a great tablet experience. If there are any issues listed, we recommend addressing them in your app as soon as possible and uploading a new binary for distribution, if needed.



For ideas on how to design and build a great tablet app, including details on how to address issues listed in your Optimization Tips page, check out the Tablet App Quality Checklist. Remember that a great tablet experience goes well beyond these basic checks. Keep working to bring your tablet users the most polished UI and richest content possible.



URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/04/tablet-optimization-tips-in-google-play.html

[Gd] Learn the Dart language and libraries with these 11 short videos

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Google Developers Blog: Learn the Dart language and libraries with these 11 short videos

Author PhotoBy Seth Ladd, Developer Advocate

Sometimes, you only have 5 minutes. Luckily, with the Dart Tips series of short video tutorials, that's all you need to start learning the new Dart language and libraries. In these videos, I show off code samples and examples across the various language features of Dart.

For example, here's a quick demo of the various types of constructors in Dart:



You can check out all the videos, or jump to the topic that most interests you:
  1. A simple Dart script
  2. Runtime modes
  3. Variables
  4. Strings, numbers, booleans, oh my!
  5. Collections in Dart
  6. Functions are fun, Pt 1
  7. Functions are fun, Pt 2
  8. Control flow statements
  9. Exceptions
  10. Classes: setters & getters
  11. Classes: Constructors
We hope you enjoy these videos about Dart. If you have questions or comments about the videos, or Dart, please join us on the Dart mailing list and on Google+. As we say on Dart Tips, stay sharp!


Seth Ladd is a Developer Advocate on Dart. He's a web engineer, book author, a conference organizer, and loves a game of badminton.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/04/learn-dart-language-and-libraries-with.html

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

[Gd] A new kind of summer job: open source coding with Google Summer of Code

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Google Developers Blog: A new kind of summer job: open source coding with Google Summer of Code

By Stephanie Taylor, Open Source team

Cross-posted from the Official Google Blog

If you’re a university student with CS chops looking to earn real-world experience this summer, consider writing code for a cool open source project with the Google Summer of Code program.


Over the past eight years more than 6,000 students have “graduated” from this global program, working with almost 400 different open source projects. Students who are accepted into the program will put the skills they have learned in university to good use by working on an actual software project over the summer. Students are paired with mentors to help address technical questions and concerns throughout the course of the project. With the knowledge and hands-on experience students gain during the summer they strengthen their future employment opportunities in fields related to their academic pursuits. Best of all, more source code is created and released for the use and benefit of all.

Interested students can submit proposals on the website starting now through Friday, May 3 at 12:00pm PDT. Get started by reviewing the ideas pages of the 177 open source projects in this year’s program, and decide which projects you’re interested in. Because Google Summer of Code has a limited number of spots for students, writing a great project proposal is essential to being selected to the program. Be sure to check out the Student Manual for advice.

For ongoing information throughout the application period and beyond, see the Google Open Source blog, join our Summer of Code mailing lists or join us on Internet relay chat at #gsoc on Freenode.

Good luck to all the open source coders out there, and remember to submit your proposals early—you only have until May 3 to apply!


Written by Stephanie Taylor, Open Source team

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/04/a-new-kind-of-summer-job-open-source.html