Friday, February 15, 2013

[Gd] Fridaygram: commerce analytics, fixing the kilogram, big prime number

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Google Developers Blog: Fridaygram: commerce analytics, fixing the kilogram, big prime number

Author Photo
By Scott Knaster, Google Developers Blog Editor

We all live together in one big blue world, but we do lots of things differently: like pay for our purchases in different currencies around the world, for example. That’s very important if you’re doing commerce on the web, because people like to pay for things in their local currencies. For e-commerce developers, Google Analytics just launched a feature to track revenue, tax, and shipping & handling costs in multiple local currencies on a single website.


This new feature, which is rolling out gradually to all Analytics users, lets you choose from 31 different flavors of local currencies when you set up your reports. With multi-currency support, you can give your site broader appeal while making the world seem like a smaller, more friendly place.

Speaking of shared international knowledge, you might know that the weight of a kilogram is defined by a cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy in France. Strangely enough, even though the International Prototype Kilogram is sealed in a vault, it’s getting infinitesimally heavier, about one-eighth the weight of a grain of sand per century. Obviously, that just won’t do. To fix this, scientists are going to clean the cylinder, and all will be well again.

Finally, spend some time this weekend contemplating the discovery of a new largest prime number, which is 17,425,170 digits long (and with the magic of the Internet, you can look at all those digits here). This prime number was discovered by Dr. Curtis Cooper – no, not that Dr. Cooper – via the Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS).


Each Friday we publish a Fridaygram to tell you about strange and wonderful stuff from Google and the world at large. And please don’t worry about memorizing that long prime number – there will not be a quiz. Not even for you, Sheldon.
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/02/fridaygram-commerce-analytics-fixing.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to  25.0.1364.87 (Platform version: 3428.149.0) for all Chromebooks and Chromeboxes. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements.

Some highlights of these changes are:


  • Updated Pepper Flash version to 11.6.602.169
  • Update to ChromeVox accessibility component
  • Improvements to suspend while using an external monitor

Known Issues:

  • On Samsung Chromebooks connecting using some 5GHz wifi access points, the system may be unable to reconnect to that access point after suspend/resume. Workaround: Restart the Chromebook and reconnect to the access point.
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Danielle Drew
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/beta-channel-update-for-chrome-os_15.html

[Gd] Chrome Beta for Android Update

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Chrome Releases: Chrome Beta for Android Update

Chrome Beta for Android has been updated to 25.0.1364.87 on Google Play. This build will be rolling out over the next few hours. This update contains a number of fixes, including:
  • More improvements to reduce flicker and graphical corruption
  • Resolution for some frequently occurring crashes
  • Better memory management
Known Issues:
  • 174665: Text selection and text input handles appear at incorrect positions
  • 171103: Login issues on certain sites including linkedin.com and hotmail.com
  • Lower resolution/blurry content takes time to sharpen during rapid scrolling on certain websites
  • Graphical corruption and flicker on some sites, particularly on maps.google.com
  • Text autosizing may break formatting on some sites
A partial list of changes in this build is available in the SVN revision log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/chrome-beta-for-android-update_14.html

[Gd] Chrome OS Management Console Update

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Chrome Releases: Chrome OS Management Console Update

The Chrome OS Management Console in the administrator control panel has been updated. This update brings new features:

  • Device Organizational Units: This feature allows administrators to apply different device settings for different sets of Chrome Devices.
  • More dynamic Delegated Administration: Admin roles can now be restricted to specific organizational units and sections of the Management Console.

Known issues are available here. Enterprise customers can report an issue by contacting support.

Lawrence Lui
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/chrome-os-management-console-update.html

[Gd] Stable Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Stable Channel Update

The Stable channel has been updated to 24.0.1312.71 for Windows Standalone Enterprise. This build contains an updated Flash (11.6.602.167). Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/stable-channel-update_14.html

[Gd] GWT 2.5.1 RC1 is here!

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Google Web Toolkit Blog: GWT 2.5.1 RC1 is here!

Today we are excited to announce GWT 2.5.1 Release Candidate 1.  Thanks to everyone who contributed to this release.

GWT 2.5.1 is a maintenance release, with many bug fixes. For a quick run-down of GWT 2.5.1 changes, read the release notes.

You can download this release from here.

- GWT Team
URL: http://googlewebtoolkit.blogspot.com/2013/02/gwt-251-rc1-is-here.html

Thursday, February 14, 2013

[Gd] Dev Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update

The Dev channel has been updated to 26.0.1410.5 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This build contains an instability fix in the WebCore (Issue: 175307) and the network: (Issue: 174720) components.

Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Tanya Radeva
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/dev-channel-update_14.html

[Gd] Security Enhancements in Jelly Bean

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Android Developers Blog: Security Enhancements in Jelly Bean

Posted by Fred Chung, Android Developer Relations team



Android 4.2, Jelly Bean, introduced quite a few new features, and under the covers it also added a number of security enhancements to ensure a more secure environment for users and developers.



This post highlights a few of the security enhancements in Android 4.2 that are especially important for developers to be aware of and understand. Regardless whether you are targeting your app to devices running Jelly Bean or to earlier versions of Android, it's a good idea to validate these areas in order to make your app more secure and robust.



Content Provider default access has changed



Content providers are a facility to enable data sharing amongst app and system components. Access to content providers should always be based on the principle of least privilege — that is, only grant the minimal possible access for another component to carry out the necessary tasks. You can control access to your content providers through a combination of the exported attribute in the provider declaration and app-specific permissions for reading/writing data in the provider.



In the example below, the provider ReadOnlyDataContentProvider sets the exported attribute to "true", explicitly declaring that it is readable by any external app that has acquired the READ_DATA permission, and that no other components can write to it.



<provider android:name=”com.example.ReadOnlyDataContentProvider”
android:authorities=”com.example”
android:exported=”true”
android:readPermission=”com.example.permission.READ_DATA” />


Since the exported attribute is an optional field, potential ambiguity arises when the field is not explicitly declared in the manifest, and that is where the behavior has changed in Android 4.2.



Prior to Jelly Bean, the default behavior of the exported field was that, if omitted, the content provider was assumed to be "exported" and accessible from other apps (subject to permissions). For example, the content provider below would be readable and writable by other apps (subject to permissions) when running on Android 4.1 or earlier. This default behavior is undesirable for sensitive data sources.



<provider android:name=”com.example.ReadOnlyDataContentProvider”
android:authorities=”com.example” />


Starting in Android 4.2, the default behavior for the same provider is now “not exported”, which prevents the possibility of inadvertent data sharing when the attribute is not declared. If either the minSdkVersion or targetSdkVersion of your app is set to 17 or higher, the content provider will no longer be accessible by other apps by default.



While this chenge helps to avoid inadvertent data sharing, it remains the best practice to always explicitly declare the exported attribute, as well as declaring proper permissions, to avoid confusion. In addition, we strongly encourage you to make use of Android Lint, which among other things will flag any exported content providers (implicit or explicit) that aren't protected by any permissions.



New implementation of SecureRandom



Android 4.2 includes a new default implementation of SecureRandom based on OpenSSL. In the older Bouncy Castle-based implementation, given a known seed, SecureRandom could technically (albeit incorrectly) be treated as a source of deterministic data. With the new OpenSSL-based implementation, this is no longer possible.



In general, the switch to the new SecureRandom implementation should be transparent to apps. However, if your app is relying on SecureRandom to generate deterministic data, such as keys for encrypting data, you may need to modify this area of your app. For example, if you have been using SecureRandom to retrieve keys for encrypting/decrypting content, you will need to find another means of doing that.



A recommended approach is to generate a truly random AES key upon first launch and store that key in internal storage. Watch for details in a forthcoming post on Android cryptography.



JavascriptInterface methods in WebViews must now be annotated



Javascript hosted in a WebView can directly invoke methods in an app through a JavaScript interface. In Android 4.1 and earlier, you could enable this by passing an object to the addJavascriptInterface() method and ensuring that the object methods intended to be accessible from JavaScript were public.



On the one hand, this was a flexible mechanism; on the other hand, any untrusted content hosted in a WebView could potentially use reflection to figure out the public methods within the JavascriptInterface object and could then make use of them.



Beginning in Android 4.2, you will now have to explicitly annotate public methods with @JavascriptInterface in order to make them accessible from hosted JavaScript. Note that this also only takes effect only if you have set your app's minSdkVersion or targetSdkVersion to 17 or higher.



// Annotation is needed for SDK version 17 or above.
@JavascriptInterface
public void doSomething(String input) {
. . .
}


Secure USB debugging



Android 4.2 introduces a new way of protecting your apps and data on compatible devices — secure USB debugging. When enabled on a device, secure debugging ensures that only host computers authorized by the user can access the internals of a USB-connected device using the ADB tool included in the Android SDK.



Secure debugging is an extension of the ADB protocol that requires hosts to authenticate before accessing any ADB services or commands. At first launch, ADB generates an RSA key pair to uniquely identifies the host. Then, when you connect a device that requires secure debugging, the system displays an authorization dialog such as the one shown below.







The user can allow USB debugging for the host for a single session or can give automatic access for all future sessions. Once a host is authorized, you can execute ADB commands for the device in the normal way. Until the device is authorized, it remains in "offline" state, as listed in the adb devices command.



For developers, the change to USB debugging should be largely transparent. If you've updated your SDK environment to include ADB version 1.0.31 (available with SDK Platform-tools r16.0.1 and higher), all you need to do is connect and authorize your device(s). If your development device appears in "offline" state, you may need to update ADB. To so so, download the latest Platform Tools release through the SDK Manager.



Secure USB debugging is enabled in the Android 4.2.2 update that is now rolling out to Nexus devices across the world. We expect many more devices to enable secure debugging in the months ahead.




More information about security best practices



For a full list of security best practices for Android apps, make sure to take a look at the Security Tips document.


URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/02/security-enhancements-in-jelly-bean.html

[Gd] New Google App Engine training videos now available

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Google App Engine Blog: New Google App Engine training videos now available



Do you wonder how App Engine orchestrates hundreds of instances so smoothly? Can you imagine how Datastore queries and transactions work behind the scenes? Do you want to know the magic of how App Engine experts dramatically reduce traffic costs using edge caching? 



We’ve just published a series of great App Engine training videos to help you better understand our platform. These seven voice-over technical videos provide insight for both newbies as well as seasoned App Engine developers.  The videos delve into each major App Engine component’s operation and how a developer can best utilize them. 









Each video runs for half an hour or less. We recommend you follow the videos in sequence if you are new to App Engine, or you can pick and choose if you’re already familiar with the platform.



Throughout the year, we intend to publish codelabs to complement the voice-over training videos, not only for App Engine, but for  Google Cloud Storage, Google Cloud SQL, Google BigQuery, and Google Compute Engine as well.  So stay tuned for updates!


-Posted by Gary Downing, Cloud Platform Solutions Technical Training Manager
URL: http://googleappengine.blogspot.com/2013/02/new-google-app-engine-training-videos.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS


The Dev channel has been updated to 26.0.1410.4 (Platform version: 3701.0.0) for all Chrome OS devices.  In addition to increased stability, this build also has some notable updates.

Updates:
  • Fix for frequent lockup problem (173558)
  • Improvements to Flash video on the new Samsung Chromebook.
  • Updated Pepper Flash to 11.6.602.169
  • Firmware update for the new Samsung Chromebook. Note: A screen with Chrome Logo and a critical update notification will show after update restarts. It will reboot by itself after firmware update completes.
Known Issues:
  • Mouse pointer doesn't change to i-beam or highlight text (175191) Workaround: Use keyboard shortcuts to highlight text (Ctrl+Shift+arrows)
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Ben Henry
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/dev-channel-update-for-chrome-os_14.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

The Beta channel has been updated to 25.0.1364.84 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This build contains improvements in stability and performance. Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/beta-channel-update_13.html

[Gd] App Engine 1.7.5 Released

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Google App Engine Blog: App Engine 1.7.5 Released



After a brief break last month, the App Engine team is back on our monthly release cycle.  We made lots of improvements to our platform in 2012 and look forward to delivering more this year.

In 1.7.5, we are releasing High-Memory Instances and Mail Bounce Notifications to General Availability.  We’ve heard the feedback that you would like to have more memory without having to pay for more CPU.  With this release, you can now utilize F4 or B4 instances with 1GB memory, which is double the amount of memory available before. Mail Bounce Notifications notify apps when mail sent through App Engine fails to deliver, so you’ll always know whether your communications are going through.

We are also introducing Experimental support for the Java 7 runtime and Google Cloud Endpoints.  Improvements in Java 7 include strings in switch statements, improved type inference for generic instance creation, and the ability to use InvokeDynamic().  Cloud Endpoints makes it easy to expose your code as RESTful and RPC services that can be easily consumed by your own web and mobile applications. Finally, an update to the Google Plugin for Eclipse makes it possible for developers to build App Engine backends that communicate with client-side Android applications via Google Cloud Messaging for Android and Cloud Endpoints.

The complete list of features and bug fixes for 1.7.5 can be found in our release notes. For App Engine coding questions and answers check us out on Stack Overflow, and for general discussion and feedback, find us on our Google Group.  You can also subscribe to the Google Cloud Platform newsletter and read our February edition.  

-Posted by Chris Ramsdale, Product Manager



URL: http://googleappengine.blogspot.com/2013/02/app-engine-175-released.html

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

[Gd] Crowdsourcing Localization with Google Apps Script

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Google Apps Developer Blog: Crowdsourcing Localization with Google Apps Script

Editor’s Note: Guest author John Gale is a Solutions Developer at Appogee, a Google Cloud Service Partner. — Arun Nagarajan

Ever since we launched Appogee Leave — the first tool in the Google Apps Marketplace for tracking employees’ absences and time off — customers have been asking, “Can you support my native language?”

Our partners offered to help crowdsource the translation, but it was a challenge to know where to begin. We started by identifying a few needs:

  • Users must be able to provide new translations
  • Users must be able to flag bad translations and recommend changes
  • Developers must be able to integrate completed translations
  • Customer service must be able to keep users informed of progress

With just a couple days’ effort in Google Apps Script, we created a complete application for crowd-sourced localization that handles each of those requirements. You can get a glimpse of the system in the screenshot below.

Source: Appogee

Let’s take a look at a few specific Apps Script tricks we used to make the whole thing work.


Avoid Collisions with Lock Service

Like many Apps Script users, we store almost all of the data for our translation system in Google Sheets, including both the list of English terms we want to translate and users’ translations.

During testing, we found that if two users submitted translations at the same time, the spreadsheet wrote both sets of changes to the same place, causing us to lose one user’s updates. To solve this, we use Apps Script’s semaphore-based Lock Service. In the code below, a public lock ensures that a user has temporary exclusive use of the spreadsheet so that their correction is added even if another user also submits a correction.


function submit(e){
/* get the fields from the UI callback */
var incorrect = e.parameter.foreignWordIncorrectTxt;
var correct = e.parameter.foreignWordCorrectTxt;
var reason = e.parameter.reasonTxt;
var lang = e.parameter.hiddenLang;

/* validate the input; return the user a message if invalid */

/* open the spreadsheet */
var active_user_email = UserProperties.getProperty('user_email') || "";
var master_spreadsheet = SpreadsheetApp.openById(MASTER_SPREADSHEET_KEY);
var correction_sheet = master_spreadsheet.getSheetByName('Corrections');

/* get a lock and update the spreadsheet */
var lock = LockService.getPublicLock();
lock.waitLock(30000);
correction_sheet.appendRow([
lang, incorrect, correct, reason, active_user_email
]);
SpreadsheetApp.flush();
lock.releaseLock();

/* reset the UI */
return reset();
}

You’ll note that this code opens the spreadsheet before obtaining a lock. At this point, we are only reading, not writing, and thus do not yet require a lock. We then tell Apps Script we are prepared to wait up to 30 seconds for our turn to lock the worksheet. On the rare occasion that a lock is not available within 30 seconds (usually because somebody else has an exclusive lock), the code throws an exception and stops execution.

Once we have acquired the lock, we quickly write the correction to the spreadsheet — including a call to SpreadsheetApp.flush() to ensure the data is written immediately — and release the lock.


Save Time with Cache Service

Because the translations are stored in a spreadsheet along with information about who provided them, it’s easy to recognize our top contributors through a leaderboard. The leaderboard data is a good candidate for caching because it’s shown to a large number of people, but only changes when we receive new updates from top-ranking users.

Like the Lock Service described earlier, the Cache Service provides both public and private variants. The public cache is useful for storing data that should be available to all users, such as the leaderboard. The private cache is more appropriate for storing information about a user, such as the translations they have submitted so far.

Since the Apps Script cache can only store strings, complex objects must first be converted. Lucky for us, Apps Script provides JSON utilities that make this conversion easy, as shown in this example:


function getBoardData(){
var cache = CacheService.getPublicCache();
var leaderboard_data = cache.get('leaderboard_data');
if (leaderboard_data == null) {
leaderboard_data = getTopTen();
cache.put('leaderboard_data',
Utilities.jsonStringify(leaderboard_data),
3600);
} else {
leaderboard_data = Utilities.jsonParse(leaderboard_data);
}
return leaderboard_data;
}

Our hope is that the leaderboard will encourage users to provide more translations by introducing some friendly competition.

Thanks to Google Apps Script and the techniques shown above, we built a powerful crowdsourcing translation system without unnecessary complexity or development effort. If you’d like to help translate Appogee Leave, we’d love to have your contribution.

Source: Appogee

John Gale   profile | twitter

John Gale is a Solutions Developer at Appogee, a Google Cloud Service Partner. John develops software that helps customers make the most of the Google Cloud platform. He has worked on a range of cloud-based applications including Google Apps Marketplace applications, client projects involving Lotus Notes application migration, and mobile data-capture applications.


URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2013/02/crowdsourcing-localization-with-google.html

[Gd] Research Projects on Google App Engine

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Google Developers Blog: Research Projects on Google App Engine

Author PhotoBy Andrea Held, Program Manager, Google University Relations

Last spring Google University Relations announced an open call for proposals for Google App Engine Research Awards. We invited academic researchers to use Google App Engine for research experiments and analysis, encouraging them to take advantage of the platform’s ability to manage heavy data loads and run large-scale applications. Submissions included proposals in various subject areas such as mathematics, computer vision, bioinformatics, climate and computer science. We selected seven projects and have awarded each $60,000 in Google App Engine credits recognizing their innovation and vision.

Today we would like to share a brief introduction of the winning projects and their Principal Investigators:
  • K. Mani Chandy, Simon Ramo Professor and Professor of Computer Science, California Institute of Technology
    Cloud-based Event Detection for Sense and Response: Develop a low-cost alternative to traditional seismic networks. The image below is taken from the Community Seismic Network map showing active clients and events in real time.
  • A dense network of seismic stations enables the Community Seismic Network to perform a finer-grained analysis of seismic events than possible with existing seismic networks.
  • Lawrence Chung, Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Dallas
    Google App Engine: Software Benchmark and Google App Engine Simulation Forecaster: Develop a tool to estimate software performance and cost on Google App Engine.
  • Julian Gough, Professor, University of Bristol, UK
    Personalised DNA Analysis: Develop a service that provides personal DNA analysis.
  • Ramesh Raskar, PhD, MIT Media Lab; Dr. Erick Baptista Passos, IFPI (Federal Institute of Technology, Brazil)
    VisionBlocks: develop a tool that delivers computer vision to people everywhere. The image below shows a current prototype implementation of VisionBlocks.
  • Many algorithms are already included, and you'll be able create your own blocks as well.
  • Norman Sadeh, Professor, Director of Mobile Commerce Lab, School of
    Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
    Mapping the Dynamics of a City & Nudging Twitter Users: uncovering local collective knowledge about the a city using social media.
  • William Stein, Professor of Mathematics, University of Washington
    Sage: Creating a Viable Free Open Source Alternative to Magma, Maple, Matlab, and Mathematica.
  • Enrique Vivoni, Associate Professor, Hydrologic Science, Engineering & Sustainability, Arizona State University
    Cloud Computing-Based Visualization and Access of Global Climate Data Sets: provide scientific data on global climate trends.
Congratulations to the award winners! We are excited about the proposals’ creativity and innovation and look forward to learning about their discoveries. To read more about specific projects, go here.


Andrea Held is a Program Manager on the University Relations team at Google. She grew up in Germany and has lived in California for almost 30 years.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/02/research-projects-on-google-app-engine.html

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

[Gd] The Dev channel has been updated to 26.0.1410.3 for Windows,

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Chrome Releases: The Dev channel has been updated to 26.0.1410.3 for Windows,

The Dev channel has been updated to 26.0.1410.3 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This build contains following updates:

  • Display an info banner on the clear browsing data dialog if the browsing data was cleared within the last 24h (Issue: 164600
  • Added possibility to history to group domains by week or month (Issue:170690
  • Added wallpaper picker icon (Issue:168913
  • Made wallpaper images immutable (Issue:173724

Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.
Tanya Radeva
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/the-dev-channel-has-been-updated-to-26.html

[Gd] Research Projects on Google App Engine

| More

Google App Engine Blog: Research Projects on Google App Engine



Last spring Google University Relations announced an open call for proposals for Google App Engine Research Awards. We invited academic researchers to use Google App Engine for research experiments and analysis, encouraging them to take advantage of the platform’s ability to manage heavy data loads and run large-scale applications. Submissions included proposals in various subject areas such as mathematics, computer vision, bioinformatics, climate and computer science. We selected seven projects and have awarded each $60,000 in Google App Engine credits recognizing their innovation and vision.




Today we would like to share a brief introduction of the winning projects and their Principal Investigators:



  • K. Mani Chandy, Simon Ramo Professor and Professor of Computer Science, California Institute of Technology

    Cloud-based Event Detection for Sense and Response: Develop a low-cost alternative to traditional seismic networks. The image below is taken from the Community Seismic Network map showing active clients and events in real time.





  • A dense network of seismic stations enables the Community Seismic Network to perform a finer-grained analysis of seismic events than possible with existing seismic networks.

  • Lawrence Chung, Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Dallas

    Google App Engine: Software Benchmark and Google App Engine Simulation Forecaster: Develop a tool to estimate software performance and cost on Google App Engine.

  • Julian Gough, Professor, University of Bristol, UK

    Personalised DNA Analysis: Develop a service that provides personal DNA analysis.

  • Ramesh Raskar, PhD, MIT Media Lab; Dr. Erick Baptista Passos, IFPI (Federal Institute of Technology, Brazil)

    VisionBlocks: develop a tool that delivers computer vision to people everywhere. The image below shows a current prototype implementation of VisionBlocks.




  • Many algorithms are already included, and you'll be able create your own blocks as well.

  • Norman Sadeh, Professor, Director of Mobile Commerce Lab, School of

    Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

    Mapping the Dynamics of a City & Nudging Twitter Users: uncovering local collective knowledge about the a city using social media.

  • William Stein, Professor of Mathematics, University of Washington

    Sage: Creating a Viable Free Open Source Alternative to Magma, Maple, Matlab, and Mathematica.

  • Enrique Vivoni, Associate Professor, Hydrologic Science, Engineering & Sustainability, Arizona State University

    Cloud Computing-Based Visualization and Access of Global Climate Data Sets: provide scientific data on global climate trends.


Congratulations to the award winners! We are excited about the proposals’ creativity and innovation and look forward to learning about their discoveries. To read more about specific projects, go here.


-Posted by Andrea Held, Program Manager, Google University Relations


URL: http://googleappengine.blogspot.com/2013/02/research-projects-on-google-app-engine_12.html

[Gd] Stable Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Stable Channel Update

The Stable channel has been updated to 24.0.1312.70 for Linux platform. This release contains an update to Flash (11.6.602.167). This Flash update has been pushed to Windows, Mac, and Chrome Frame platforms through component updater.

Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/stable-channel-update_12.html

[Gd] Flip bits, not burgers: Google Summer of Code 2013 is on!

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Google Developers Blog: Flip bits, not burgers: Google Summer of Code 2013 is on!


Google Summer of Code logo

Cross-posted with the Google Open Source Blog

I am proud to share the news that Google Summer of Code 2013 will be happening again this year.

This will be the 9th year for Google Summer of Code, an innovative program dedicated to introducing students from colleges and universities around the world to open source software development. The program offers student developers stipends to write code for various open source projects with the help of mentoring organizations from all around the globe. Over the past eight years Google Summer of Code has had 6,000 students from over 100 countries complete the program. Our goal is to help these students pursue academic challenges over the summer break while they create and release open source code for the benefit of all.

Spread the word to your friends! If you know of a university student who would be interested in working on open source projects this summer, or if you know of an organization that might want to mentor students to work on their open source projects, please direct them to our Google Summer of Code 2013 website where they can find our timeline along with the FAQs. And stay tuned for more details coming soon!


Written by Carol Smith, Open Source Team

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/02/flip-bits-not-burgers-google-summer-of.html

[Gd] Udacity HTML5 Game Development course now live

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Google Developers Blog: Udacity HTML5 Game Development course now live

Author Photo
By Peter Lubbers, Program Manager, Google Chrome Developer Relations

We just launched our new Udacity HTML5 Game Development course (CS255). This course focuses on building a game in JavaScript and is taught by Colt McAnlis (Developer Advocate, Chrome Developer Relations), Peter Lubbers (Program Manager, Chrome Developer Relations), and Sean Bennett (Architect, Udacity). Yep, these guys:

instructors

This Thursday, February 14th at 10:30 a.m. PST we are hosting an introductory Google Developers Live session with special guest Sebastian Thrun (Udacity's CEO). In this session we will tell you all about the content of the course and and we will answer your questions live. Make sure you add this live event to your calendar and tune in on Thursday: http://goo.gl/ffs8s (you can ask and vote for your questions there, too).

We have a series of exciting initiatives that we are organizing in parallel. First, we’ll be running a study group for the first several weeks of the course. The study group will be hosted at Google’s San Francisco office, and Colt, Peter, and Sean will be there to answer any questions you might have and to help you out with the course material. If you don’t live around San Francisco, or can’t make it for whatever reason, don’t worry, because we’ll be livestreaming and recording these study groups.

cars with Udacity and HTML5 license plates

In addition to the study group, Udacity is also organizing an exciting contest focused around the course. The goal of this contest is to build your own game using the knowledge and skills you've gained from the course. You can sign up for the course here and tune into GDL on Thursday to find out more about it.


Peter Lubbers is a Program Manager on the Chrome Developer Relations Team, spreading HTML5 and Open Web goodness. He is the founder of the San Francisco HTML5 User Group--the world's first and largest HTML5 meetup with over 6,000 members. Peter is the author of "Pro HTML5 Programming" (Apress) and, yes, his car's license plate is HTML5!

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/02/udacity-html5-game-development-course.html