Saturday, February 9, 2013

[Gd] Fridaygram: online safety, asteroid close call, spectacular glacier

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Google Developers Blog: Fridaygram: online safety, asteroid close call, spectacular glacier

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By Scott Knaster, Google Developers Blog Editor

You’re reading a blog for developers, so chances are you’re probably pretty savvy about how things work online, and that includes safety and security. Of course, just because we know how to be secure doesn’t mean we always do what we should. And there are all our less-technical friends and family members who often turn to us for guidance. To help keep people secure online, we recently updated the site Good to Know: A guide to staying safe and secure online.


safety logo

This site contains lots of common sense and advanced tips, such as how to secure your passwords, ways you can prevent identity theft, and a guide to technical terminology. Although Good to Know is designed to be useful to people from all backgrounds, even us tech folks can find some handy information there.

Speaking of safety, it turns out we can all can relax about Asteroid 2012 DA 14. According to NASA, the 45-meter object will get close to Earth, but no closer than about 17,000 miles. The space agency also says the asteroid won’t be visible to the naked eye, and will be hard to track even with telescopes. But the important thing is that we won’t have another Tunguska event.

Although it looks like we’re going to avoid an asteroid impact, nature continues to demonstrate enormous power that is sometimes destructive and awesome. A camera crew recently filmed an immense glacier calving, an event that lasted more than an hour. You can watch it from the comfort of your asteroid-safe home.


Safety is important, whether you’re on the Internet or looking out for asteroids. While we spend most of the week here telling you about Google developer topics, Fridaygram is set aside for science, technology, and other fun & generally nerdy topics.

URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/02/fridaygram-online-safety-asteroid-close.html

Friday, February 8, 2013

[Gd] Elevate your apps in Google Drive

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Google Developers Blog: Elevate your apps in Google Drive

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By Nicolas Garnier, Developer Relations

When Google Drive launched, we also introduced the Google Drive SDK, which enables you to deeply integrate your apps into Drive. Using the Drive SDK, you can offer your users an experience similar to how Google Docs or Google Sheets interact with Drive. More than a hundred web apps now integrate with Google Drive in this way.

Today we are making several changes to Google Drive to help users more easily discover, connect and use these Drive-enabled apps.


Google Drive Create menu

The Google Drive Create menu now elevates Drive-connected apps to the same level as Google apps such as Docs and Sheets. This makes your Drive-connected apps easier to reach and more visible to Google Drive users.


New Google Drive Create menu

As you can see, we’ve made some space in the Create menu for your apps, which users can add by clicking on Connect more apps.


Browse and Connect Drive-enabled Apps

Google Drive users can now browse and connect Drive-enabled apps right from within Drive thanks to the new Connect apps to Drive dialog:

Connect some Google Drive-enabled web apps to your Drive

After installing an app, users can instantly start using your Drive app to create or open files directly from within Drive.

Opening a file in Google Drive with a connected app

If your app is already Google Drive-enabled and listed in the Chrome Web Store’s Drive collection, you don’t have to do anything new to take advantage of these new features. We will automatically pull all the information from your existing Chrome Web Store listing.

If your web app is not yet Google Drive-enabled, check out how you can integrate with the create-new and the open-with actions and then get your Drive-enabled app listed in the new Connect apps to Drive dialog.


Nicolas Garnier joined Google’s Developer Relations in 2008 and lives in Zurich. He is a Developer Advocate for Google Drive and Google Apps. Nicolas is also the lead engineer for the OAuth 2.0 Playground.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/02/elevate-your-apps-in-google-drive.html

Thursday, February 7, 2013

[Gd] Using WebP to Improve Speed

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Chromium Blog: Using WebP to Improve Speed

Since speed is critical for a good experience when using the web, at Google we’re always exploring ways to make the web faster. As it turns out, one of the biggest bang-for-the-buck ways to do that is by replacing JPEG and PNG images with WebP. WebP offers significantly better compression than these legacy formats (around 35% better in most cases), and when you consider that over 60% of typical page sizes are images, the benefits can be substantial. WebP translates directly into less bandwidth consumption, decreased latency, faster page loads, better battery consumption on mobile, and overall happier users.

Case in point: the Chrome Web Store uses many large promotional images and tiles on its home page, making it a very heavyweight page. The team was eager to find ways to improve its speed, without sacrificing the user experience or giving up image quality. WebP to the rescue!

By converting PNGs and JPEGs to WebP, the Chrome Web Store was able to reduce image sizes by about 30% on average (here’s one sample image in WebP at 8.3kB and JPEG at 32kB). Given the number of requests Chrome Web Store serves, this adds up to several terabytes of savings every day.

For users, the rubber meets the road when it comes to how fast the page loads though. On this score, with WebP we were able to reduce average home page load time by nearly one-third — a huge benefit for our users.

To implement WebP, the team first added transcoding support to the image request pipeline; then at runtime the site checks whether the client browser supports WebP and requests the WebP version for each image when it does. The effort to implement it turned out to be not much work for a lot of benefit.

To find out more about how you can make your site faster, visit our Make the Web Faster site and dive into WebP.

Posted by Stephen Konig, Product Manager
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2013/02/using-webp-to-improve-speed.html

[Gd] Chrome Beta for Android Update

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Chrome Releases: Chrome Beta for Android Update

Chrome Beta for Android has been updated to 25.0.1364.74 on Google Play. This build will be rolling out over the next few hours. This update contains a number of fixes, including:
  • 173232: Chrome does not load pages on Samsung Galaxy S2
  • 158633: Overaggressive tap disambiguation popup
  • 167089: Blank screen when opening links from external apps
  • Resolution for some frequently occurring crashes
Known Issues:
  • 171103: Login issues on certain sites including linkedin.com and hotmail.com
  • 174665: Text selection and text input handles appear at incorrect positions
  • Lower resolution/blurry content takes time to sharpen during rapid scrolling on certain websites
  • Graphical corruption and flicker on some sites, particularly on maps.google.com
  • Text autosizing may break formatting on some sites
  • Continuing sad tabs/tab crashes, especially on tablets
A partial list of changes in this build is available in the SVN revision log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/chrome-beta-for-android-update_6.html

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

[Gd] Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Beta channel has been updated to  25.0.1364.68 (Platform version: 3428.127.0) for all Chromebooks and Chromeboxes. This build contains a number of bug fixes, security updates and feature enhancements.

Some highlights of these changes are:

  • Updated Netflix plugin
  • Fixed issue with printing menu crashing immediately on launch (166629)
  • Change to keyboard shortcut: Ctrl-M now minimizes windows
  • Updated Pepper Flash version to 11.5.31.140
  • HTML5 Content Decryption Module (CDM) with WebM support
  • Improvements to network notifications shown (170011)
  • Fix to device freeze when tab pressed at login (169956)
  • Fix to allow Chrome Office Viewer to open files containing % or spaces in the name (168341)

Known Issues:
  • 172749 -  For Samsung Series 5 Chromebooks, a sync error prompt doesn't pop up for account with custom passphrase

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Danielle Drew
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/beta-channel-update-for-chrome-os.html

[Gd] Keeping Up with YouTube API Updates

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YouTube API Blog: Keeping Up with YouTube API Updates

As the YouTube APIs continue to evolve, release notes are a good place to keep track of improvements. However, with a busy life, you may not remember checking regularly for updates. Now, for the first time, you can subscribe to RSS feeds to be notified as soon as new features are available.

The release notes for all of the YouTube APIs and widgets have their own corresponding RSS feed.
Feeds are available for:


Going forward, we will be pushing updates via RSS for all of the YouTube APIs. Follow our YouTube for Developers Google+ page, and subscribe to the RSS feeds to get the latest API updates!

Cheers,
Ibrahim Ulukaya, YouTube API Team
URL: http://apiblog.youtube.com/2013/02/keeping-up-with-youtube-api-updates.html

[Gd] Updates to manifest V1 Chrome Web Store items to be blocked in March

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Chromium Blog: Updates to manifest V1 Chrome Web Store items to be blocked in March

Last year, Chrome introduced manifest V2 to Apps and Extension developers, which brings a variety of security and API improvements such as a default Content Security Policy. As of Chrome 18, manifest V1 was officially deprecated. At the time, we published our manifest version support schedule to give developers transparency and insight into our plans for migrating to the new version.

Today, we’re announcing a slight update to that schedule, to let developers know that they have until Monday, March 4, 2013 to make updates to their existing manifest V1-based items. After that date, the Chrome Web Store will block all updates to products based on manifest V1 unless the update includes switching it to manifest V2.

Developers are strongly encouraged to migrate their items to manifest V2 now. Follow the migration tutorial, and you can always contact us on the chromium-apps forum and our G+ page with any questions you may have.

Posted by Joe Marini, Developer Advocate
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2013/02/updates-to-manifest-v1-chrome-web-store.html

[Gd] Introducing "Find Your Way to Oz", a new Chrome Experiment

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Google Developers Blog: Introducing "Find Your Way to Oz", a new Chrome Experiment

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By Max Heinritz, Associate Product Magician (Manager)

Cross-posted with the Chromium Blog

Today we unveiled "Find Your Way To Oz", a new Chrome Experiment inspired by the upcoming feature film Oz The Great and Powerful. Developed by UNIT9, this experiment brings together Disney’s unique storytelling tradition and the power of the web platform, allowing users to interact with the web in a completely new way.



The desktop version of "Find Your Way To Oz" uses many of the open web’s more advanced features:
  • Immersive Graphics: The experiment uses WebGL for the main 3D environment, CSS3 features such as CSS Transitions for various visual embellishments, and GLSL shaders for the tornado’s ominous look and feel.
  • Rich Audio: As the user explores the experiment, the 3D sound dynamically adapts thanks to the Web Audio API. The same API powers the experiment’s music composing section.
  • Camera-based interactions: Through WebRTC’s getUserMedia API, users can become circus characters or record their own mini-movies.
The experiment’s mobile web version also uses cutting-edge web technologies. These include graphics features such as accelerated 3D transforms and sprite sheets as well as mobile hardware features like camera, multi-touch, gyroscope and accelerometer. Together they create an experience that can normally only be found in native apps.

To learn more about how this experiment was built, read our technical case study and join us for a Google Developers Live event on February 11th at 11 a.m. GMT where we’ll be talking to the team behind the project. Alternatively, use Chrome’s developer tools to see how the experiment works on your own, perhaps finding in the process your own path to the yellow brick road.


Max Heinritz is an Associate Product Manager on the Chrome Web Platform team. He's helping the web reach its potential to become the universal application platform. On the weekends you can find him exploring the Northern California wilderness.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/02/introducing-find-your-way-to-oz-new.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

The Beta channel has been updated to 25.0.1364.68 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This build contains improvements in stability and performance. Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/beta-channel-update.html

[Gd] Stable Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Stable Channel Update

The Stable channel has been updated to 24.0.1312.60 for Windows Standalone Enterprise. This build fixes a known issue. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/stable-channel-update_5.html

[Gd] Introducing “Find Your Way to Oz”, a new Chrome Experiment

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Chromium Blog: Introducing “Find Your Way to Oz”, a new Chrome Experiment

Earlier today we unveiled Find Your Way To Oz, a new Chrome Experiment inspired by the upcoming feature film Oz The Great and Powerful. Developed by UNIT9, this experiment brings together Disney’s unique storytelling tradition and the power of the web platform, allowing users to interact with the web in a completely new way.



The desktop version of “Find Your Way To Oz” uses many of the open web’s more advanced features:
  • Immersive Graphics: The experiment uses WebGL for the main 3D environment, CSS3 features such as CSS Transitions for various visual embellishments, and GLSL shaders for the tornado’s ominous look and feel. 
  • Rich Audio: As the user explores the experiment, the 3D sound dynamically adapts thanks to the Web Audio API. The same API powers the experiment’s music composing section. 
  • Camera-based interactions: Through WebRTC’s getUserMedia API, users can become circus characters or record their own mini-movies. 
The experiment’s mobile web version also uses cutting-edge web technologies. These include graphics features such as accelerated 3D transforms and sprite sheets as well as mobile hardware features like camera, multi-touch, gyroscope and accelerometer. Together they create an experience that can normally only be found in native apps.

To learn more about how this experiment was built, read our technical case study and join us for a Google Developers Live event on February 11th at 11 a.m. GMT where we’ll be talking to the team behind the project. Alternatively, use Chrome’s developer tools to see how the experiment works on your own, perhaps finding in the process your own path to the yellow brick road.

Posted by Max Heinritz, Product Magician (Manager)
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2013/02/introducing-find-your-way-to-oz-new.html

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

[Gd] Google Code-in 2012 Grand Prize Winners... Drumroll Please!

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Google Developers Blog: Google Code-in 2012 Grand Prize Winners... Drumroll Please!

By Stephanie Taylor, Google Open Source Programs Office

Cross-posted with the Google Open Source Blog


We are thrilled to announce the 20 grand prize winners of Google Code-in 2012, a contest designed to introduce teenagers to the world of open source software development. Congratulations to all 334 students from 36 countries who participated in the contest, completing 1,925 tasks.

Each of the 10 open source mentoring organizations that worked with the students during the contest chose 2 students to be their organization’s grand prize winners based on the students’ comprehensive body of work during the seven week contest period.

Students are listed alphabetically (by first name) with their country and the organization that they worked with during Google Code-in 2012.

Agustín Zubiaga, Uruguay - Sugar Labs
Akshay S Kashyap, India - BRL-CAD
Aleksandar Ivanov, Bulgaria - RTEMS
Aneesh Dogra, India - Sugar Labs
Aviral Dasgupta, India - Sahana Software Foundation
Cezar El-Nazli, Romania - BRL-CAD
Conor Flynn, Ireland - Apertium
Drew Gottlieb, United States - Copyleft Games Group
Illya Kovalevskyy, Ukraine - KDE
Liezl Puzon, United States - Sahana Software Foundation
Mathew Kallada, Canada - RTEMS
Matthew Bauer, United States - The NetBSD Project
Mingzhe Wang, China - The NetBSD Project
Mohammed Nafees, India - KDE
Nicolás Satragno, Argentina - The Fedora Project
Przemysław Buczkowski, Poland - Haiku
Qasim Iqbal, Canada - Apertium
Samuel Kim, United States - Copyleft Games Group
Vladimir Angelov, Bulgaria - Haiku
Ze Yue Wu, Australia - The Fedora Project


Congratulations Google Code-in 2012 Grand Prize Winners!

These 20 pre-university students completed an impressive 576 tasks ranging from annotating face recognition for disaster response efforts to creating videos and screencasts to teach others about the organization’s software to writing scripts to develop MySQL tables. In late April, the grand prize winners will be flown to Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, California, USA along with a parent or legal guardian for a four night visit.  During the trip the students will have the opportunity to participate in an awards ceremony, meet with Google engineers, have a full day of fun exploring San Francisco, and make new friends also interested in open source development.

A couple of quotes from the mentors that worked with this year’s Google Code-in students:
'They're surprisingly motivated, excited to contribute, genuinely interested, and productive to boot. Initial estimates indicate we may get years worth of work done and one student has already earned commit status, two others are getting close.'  -- Sean Morrison, BRL-CAD Organization Administrator and Mentor, two weeks after the start of the contest 
‘One of my favorite quotes, one you probably have seen before, from a student: "this is my first patch to an open source project"’ -- Walter Bender, Sugar Labs Organization Administrator and Mentor
And that is what this contest is all about, introducing students to the many ways that they can contribute to open source software development. An enormous thank you to all of the students, IT teachers, parents, mentors and organization administrators who made the Google Code-in 2012 a success!

Written by Stephanie Taylor, Open Source Programs

Posted by Ashleigh Rentz, Editor Emerita
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/02/google-code-in-2012-grand-prize-winners.html

Monday, February 4, 2013

[Gd] Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 26.0.1403.0 (Platform version: 3658.0.0) for all Chrome OS devices.

Updates:
  • Audio on HDMI has been fixed and is now working.
  • Various crash fixes, e.g. 173253
  • Netflix is working again.
Known issues include:
  • Occasional lockup on the new Samsung Chromebook.  Workaround: power cycle device.
  • A few Flash video sites do not work correctly on the new Samsung Chromebook.
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Ben Henry
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/dev-channel-update-for-chrome-os.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update


The Dev channel has been updated to 26.0.1403.0 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This build contains following updates:

  • Introduced a different variable icon for VPN (Issue: 172317)
  • Enabled showing Google now notifications in Chrome (Issue: 164227)
  • Implemented drag URL onto Home Button to set homepage (Issue: 152210)
  • Enabled speech bubble for platform apps (Issue: 164382
  • Added UI to printing selection with print preview (Issue: 83098)
  • Added backup URL support for safe browsing data requests (Issue: 155753)
  • Added support for Chrome's identity API (Issue: 134213)
  • Enabled showing a modal dialog (instead of a bubble) for one-click sign in confirmation window (Issue: 171330)
  • Added search token to omnibox in Mac (Issue: 163190)
  • Changed the gray omnibox suggest color to black (Issue: 172142)
  • Fixed a crash in the DXVA decoder in Chrome (Issue: 171673)
  • Fixed the hierarchy arrow for nested bookmark folders for Mac (Issue: 111101)
  • Fixed showing of the profile picture in the uber tray when user clicks (Issue: 140961)
  • Fixed bug causing tab favicon media indicator to not turn off  (Issue: 171077)
  • Fixed unintended first item selection when focusing using mouse (Issue: 172283)
  • Hided action box while typing in an omnibox (Issue: 157232)
  • Hided new Autofill UI when the user moves the window (Issue: 171673)
  • Reverted the appearance of simple notifications (Issue: 172358)
  • Disabled the "Open All in Incognito window" in Context menu for invalid urls (Issue: 106609)


Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Tanya Radeva

Google Chrome








URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/dev-channel-update.html

[Gd] Scaling SongPop to 60 million users with App Engine and Google Cloud Storage

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Google App Engine Blog: Scaling SongPop to 60 million users with App Engine and Google Cloud Storage



Continuing our Developer Insights series, today’s guest bloggers are Olivier Michon, CTO, and Alexis Hanicotte, software engineer, from Fresh Planet, maker of the popular mobile application SongPop.  SongPop is a social application where players compete to be the fastest to guess the name of a song or artist.




SongPop is a social mobile app where players compete on who will be the fastest to guess a songs’ artist or title. It is a huge success for our very small team of just 6 engineers. We now have more than 60 million users, were the number 5 most downloaded iOS game of 2012, and went from 0 to more than 10k queries/second on our servers in less than 6 months. This has been made possible in large part because we run on Google App Engine.






App Engine allows us to quickly prototype, iterate and release our games.  We’ve been accumulating experience with the platform since 2009, but really saw the power of autoscaling once SongPop became a hit.





Our experience scaling with App Engine




SongPop was released in May 2012.  During our growth to our first 100,000 daily active users (DAU), our App Engine backend scaled smoothly.  This allowed us to spend our time making actual improvements to the game experience, while our user growth continued at a rapid pace.



We opened a Premier Account with App Engine around the time when we reached 100,000 DAU which gave us access to live customer support.  It came in handy when we encountered two downtimes, with one lasting just 10 minutes and the other for 1 hour.  But we were able to promptly reach Premier Support and had Google engineers investigate these issues with us.  



Once we reached 500,000 DAU, we applied a variety of optimization ideas to reduce latency.  For example, we used to have user data spread over many models, but we combined them into a single entry in the Datastore to reduce read operations.  We also often needed the list of a user’s opponents, so instead of querying every time, we cached this result using Memcache.  It only took one engineer and just 4 days of work to reduce the latency with these optimizations.   



As we reached the milestone of 1 million DAU, some Datastore queries (used to find random opponents in the game) showed high latencies and a high rate of timeouts.  We had to enforce deadlines, implement better fallbacks and identified, with the help of Premier Support, that degraded performance came from the fact that our queries were relying on many different indexed properties.  So the solution was simple - either add a composite index with all the properties we needed or combine into a single one.



Using App Engine + Google Cloud Storage



For each game session, our users need to download song samples in order to play. It is critical that this data gets delivered fast and reliably wherever the user is located. We chose to use Google Cloud Storage for this use case.   It has proved to provide high performance content delivery, as we have been able to serve 17 terabytes/day of songs and images worldwide.


In addition to its reliability, Cloud Storage is great because of its integration with App Engine. We can easily read and write files from our application to Cloud Storage using the same syntax as we would use to write local files (using Python). We found it intuitive and convenient because you do not have to manage opaque keys to retrieve your files (just use the path you specified), and you can browse your files through a directory-like structure. Cloud Storage also allows you to manage access rights, can be used with Google BigQuery, and it is priced affordably compared to other solutions we considered.









Architecture diagram of SongPop









Long live App Engine!






When we speak to other game developers, we always recommend that they use App Engine.  We’ve used other services such as EC2 from Amazon Web Services for other games before, but we’ve found App Engine to be a better service for our needs.  We don’t want to spend time setting up servers and load balancing, when we could instead use that time to build great games and let our service provider handle the infrastructure for us.






When we compare the development of SongPop to stories of other apps, we’re thankful that App Engine allowed us to have only one engineer working full-time on the backend portion of our app.  Even better, he was able to do additional work on adding new features to the game instead of solely focusing on infrastructure issues.  With App Engine, scaling our game was easy.





Others things we want to share




  • Do not worry if documented resources limits and rates look too small, they are just there to make sure one app does not abuse any resource, but they can scale. Most of our limits have been increased by 18-fold! We had days where we made 230,000,000 UrlFetch API calls, for instance.

  • The Location headers is a really great feature,  because it is easily accessible for a wide variety of use cases, such as selecting users’ opponents or building their game profile.




Contributed by Olivier Michon and Alexis Hanicotte, FreshPlanet



Posted by Zafir Khan, Product Marketing Manager, Google App Engine

URL: http://googleappengine.blogspot.com/2013/02/scaling-songpop-to-60-million-users.html

[Gd] Hello Firefox, this is Chrome calling!

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Chromium Blog: Hello Firefox, this is Chrome calling!

For the first time, Chrome and Firefox can “talk” to each other via WebRTC. WebRTC is a new set of technologies that brings clear crisp voice, sharp high-definition (HD) video and low-delay communication to the web browser.

From the very beginning, this joint WebRTC effort was embraced by the open web community, including engineers from the Chrome and Firefox teams. The common goal was to help developers offer rich, secure communications, integrated directly into their web applications.

In order to succeed, a web-based communications platform needs to work across browsers. Thanks to the work and participation of the W3C and IETF communities in developing the platform, Chrome and Firefox can now communicate by using standard technologies such as the Opus and VP8 codecs for audio and video, DTLS-SRTP for encryption, and ICE for networking.

To try this yourself, you’ll need desktop Chrome 25 Beta and Firefox Nightly for Desktop. In Firefox, you'll need to go to about:config and set the media.peerconnection.enabled pref to "true”. Then head over to the WebRTC demo site and start calling.

For developers looking to include this functionality in their own apps, there are a few places you can go to get more information. You can look at the source code of the AppRTC demo, a library that makes writing cross-browser WebRTC apps a snap, and a document detailing some of the minor differences between browsers.

You can read more from Mozilla’s hacks blog here and view our first “Official” call at the video below:


Posted by Maire Reavy, Firefox Media Product Lead and Serge Lachapelle, Chrome Product Manager
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2013/02/hello-firefox-this-is-chrome-calling.html

[Gd] Stable Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Stable Channel Update

The Stable channel has been updated to 24.0.1312.68 for Linux. This build contains the fix for Pepper Flash. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/02/stable-channel-update.html