Saturday, January 19, 2013

[Gd] Fridaygram: student doodlers, wrinkled fingers, space station tour

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Google Developers Blog: Fridaygram: student doodlers, wrinkled fingers, space station tour

Author PhotoBy Scott Knaster, Google Developers Blog Editor

Each year the Doodle 4 Google competition gives K - 12 students in the U.S. a chance to win a place for their work on the Google homepage, along with some nice prizes. Submissions are open from now until March 22, and you can see all the rules and other information on the competition site.

This is the sixth year for Doodle 4 Google. If you’re a grade school student in the U.S., or you know someone who is, be sure to let them know about this cool program.

You can submit your Doodle 4 Google entry on paper, because lots of people like to do their drawing old school, with their hands. And speaking of hands, scientists have long wondered why fingers on those hands get wrinkled after long exposure to water, such as in a swimming pool or bathtub. A recent study suggests that this wrinkle effect might be an evolutionary advantage to help us gain a better grip on wet objects. Long ago, this might have helped with food gathering; now, it’s mostly just weird.

Finally, please take 25 minutes of your weekend and watch this wonderful video tour of the International Space Station conducted by departing commander Sunita Williams. Unless you’ve been to space, you’ll probably see things you’ve never seen before. And even if you have been to space, or you are from space, you’ll probably enjoy it.


Each week we take a break from developer topics and publish Fridaygram, featuring interesting stuff from Google and the rest of the universe that you might not have noticed before. Last year we didn’t mention Doodle 4 Google until it was over; we thought it would be better to talk about it sooner this time.
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/01/fridaygram-student-doodlers-wrinkled.html

Friday, January 18, 2013

[Gd] The Deadline to Signup for GTAC is Jan 23

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Google Testing Blog: The Deadline to Signup for GTAC is Jan 23


By The GTAC Committee

If you would like to attend or speak at GTAC 2013, the deadline to sign-up is January 23rd, 2013.

We are really excited about hosting this event at our fabulous New York City office. We’ve received many interesting presentation proposals so far, and this year’s GTAC will certainly be a fascinating, important event for test automation professionals. We are still accepting proposals, so it’s not too late to add yours for consideration.

You can find details about the conference at our new site:
  developers.google.com/gtac
We will be making regular updates to this site over the next several weeks.

For those that have already signed up to attend or speak, we will contact you directly in early February.
URL: http://googletesting.blogspot.com/2013/01/the-deadline-to-signup-for-gtac-is-jan.html

[Gd] Google Search in Chrome gets more secure

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Chromium Blog: Google Search in Chrome gets more secure

Today, when users are signed in to Google, Chrome sends their searches from the Chrome address bar (“omnibox”) over Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). Starting with Chrome 25 (currently in the Dev and Beta channels), we’re doing the same thing for Chrome omnibox searches performed by users who aren’t signed in to Google.

Serving content over SSL provides users with a more secure and private search experience. It helps ensure that malicious actors who might intercept people’s internet traffic can’t see their queries. Many major sites have begun serving content over SSL by default, such as Gmail in early 2010, Twitter in February 2012, and Facebook in November 2012. Search has also been moving toward encryption. Google introduced Encrypted Search in May 2010 and made encryption the default for signed-in users starting in October 2011. Firefox announced a switch to SSL for all Google searches in July 2012, and Safari did the same thing in September 2012. Chrome is continuing this trend.

Users shouldn’t notice any changes. If anything, their searches will be slightly faster due to Chrome’s implementation of the SPDY protocol, but there should be no other user-visible effect.

Posted by Adam Langley, Software Engineer
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2013/01/google-search-in-chrome-gets-more-secure.html

[Gd] Stable Channel Update for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Stable Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Stable channel has been updated to 23.0.1271.111 (Platform version: 2913.331.0) for all Chrome OS devices. Machines will receive this update over the next several days.

Some highlights of these changes are: 

  • New firmware version for Acer C7 
  • New Flash version 11.5.31.5 for x86 
  • New Flash version 11.5.31.30 for arm 
  • Stability fixes 

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/01/stable-channel-update-for-chrome-os.html

Thursday, January 17, 2013

[Gd] Dev Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update

The Dev channel has been updated to 26.0.1386.0 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This build contains following updates:
  • Fixed marking notifications when opened and closed (Issue: 169388)
  • Fixed web popup menus (Issue: 166832)
  • Fixed renderer form_autofill_util changes to support Checkboxes and Radiobuttons (Issue: 157636)
  • Fixed decoding of URL in bookmark editor (Issue: 165648)
  • Added the preferences and UI to make the launcher opt-inable (Issue: 151676)
  • Added incognito visualization to items in the new app menu (Issue: 169842)
  • Renamed the magnifier names: "Full" -> "Entire screen", "Partial" -> "Lens" (Issue: 166832)
  • Enable webkit preference for Chromium to disallow unsafe plugin pasting (Issue: 112325)
  • Fixed thumbnail view on Drive (Issue 170022)
  • Fixed crash bug in BookmarkEditorView (Issue 167385)
Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Tanya Radeva
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/01/dev-channel-update_17.html

[Gd] Chrome Beta for Android Update

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Chrome Releases: Chrome Beta for Android Update

Chrome Beta for Android has been updated to 25.0.1364.37 on Google Play. This build will be rolling out over the next few hours. This update contains a number of fixes, including:
  • 165783: Enable compositing scrollable frames on Android
  • 168368: Chrome progress bar should be displayed as soon as the user clicks a link
  • 165244 - Text handler jumps or disappears when moving
  • 162486 - iframe scrolling broken
Known Issues:
  • 170436 - When upgrading, Chrome icon is not getting updated
  • 170653 - Scroll position is reset momentarily when double-tapping in footer/gutter on some pages
  • Sometimes flickering and graphical glitches are observed while opening new tab
  • Frequent freeze on devices with specific versions of Qualcomm GPU driver
  • Text autosizing may break formatting on some sites
  • Video continues playing after exiting fullscreen on android phones
  • [HTC Droid DNA] Getting crash on tabswitcher mode
  • 163439 - yahoo.com page links are not working
  • 166233 - Cannot submit comments on facebook posts or pictures
  • 158633: Tap disambiguation overaggressive
A partial list of changes in this build is available in the SVN revision log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/01/chrome-beta-for-android-update_17.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

The Beta channel has been updated to 25.0.1364.36 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. This build contains improvements in stability and fixes for few other issues. There is one known issue:
  • [170318] The Chrome Apps <webview> Browser Demo does not render correctly.
Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/01/beta-channel-update_16.html

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

[Gd] Calling all coders: Hardcode, the secure coding contest for App Engine

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Google App Engine Blog: Calling all coders: Hardcode, the secure coding contest for App Engine



Originally posted on the Google Online Security Blog

Protecting user security and privacy is a huge responsibility, and software security is a big part of it. Learning about new ways to break applications is important, but learning preventative skills to use when building software, like secure design and coding practices, is just as critical. To help promote secure development habits, Google is once again partnering with the organizers of SyScan to host Hardcode, a secure coding contest on the Google App Engine platform.

Participation will be open to teams of up to 5 full-time students (undergraduate or high school). Contestants will be asked to develop open source applications that meet a set of functional and security requirements. The contest will consist of two rounds: a qualifying round over the Internet, with broad participation from any team of students, and a final round, to be held during SyScan on April 23-25 in Singapore.

During the qualifying round, teams will be tasked with building an application and describing its security design. A panel of judges will assess all submitted applications and select the top five to compete in the final round.

At SyScan, the five finalist teams will be asked to develop a set of additional features and fix any security flaws identified in their qualifying submission. After two more days of hacking, a panel of judges will rank the projects and select a grand prize winning team that will receive $20,000 Singapore dollars. The 2nd-5th place finalist teams will receive $15,000, $10,000, $5,000, and $5,000 Singapore dollars, respectively.

Hardcode begins on Friday, January 18th. Full contest details will be be announced via our mailing list, so subscribe there for more information!

Posted by Parisa Tabriz, Security Team
URL: http://googleappengine.blogspot.com/2013/01/calling-all-coders-hardcode-secure.html

[Gd] A simple, yet powerful custom search engine

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Custom Search Engine: A simple, yet powerful custom search engine

Simplicity and speed are two principles we love when it comes to design at Google. Today, we’re excited to announce the new CSE layout that displays results in an overlay, on top of any content on your page.


What this means for developers:


  • Takes seconds to create. We simplified the creation interface to get you going faster.

  • One snippet for search box and results. Place it where you want your search box to appear.

  • Powerful features now come by default: autocomplete, image thumbnails and results sorting.



What this means for your users:

  • Uninterrupted browsing experience.

  • Faster, more simple search means more chances for your users to discover great content from your site.




You may visit W3Schools to see the new layout in action or use the CSE below which searches our blog.








Try out the new layout by creating a new search engine. It takes less than a minute. Once you have your search engine snippet ready, simply paste it on your website.



Posted by Manolis Kounelakis and Neelesh Bodas, Custom Search team



URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/Syga/~3/5-HvjUVSMAM/a-simple-yet-powerful-custom-search.html

[Gd] Calling student coders: Hardcode, the secure coding contest for App Engine

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Google Developers Blog: Calling student coders: Hardcode, the secure coding contest for App Engine

By Parisa Tabriz, Security Team

Cross-posted from the Google Online Security Blog

Protecting user security and privacy is a huge responsibility, and software security is a big part of it. Learning about new ways to “break” applications is important, but learning preventative skills to use when “building” software, like secure design and coding practices, is just as critical. To help promote secure development habits, Google is once again partnering with the organizers of SyScan to host Hardcode, a secure coding contest on the Google App Engine platform.



Participation will be open to teams of up to 5 full-time students (undergraduate or high school, additional restrictions may apply). Contestants will be asked to develop open source applications that meet a set of functional and security requirements. The contest will consist of two rounds: a qualifying round over the Internet, with broad participation from any team of students, and a final round, to be held during SyScan on April 23-25 in Singapore.

During the qualifying round, teams will be tasked with building an application and describing its security design. A panel of judges will assess all submitted applications and select the top five to compete in the final round.

At SyScan, the five finalist teams will be asked to develop a set of additional features and fix any security flaws identified in their qualifying submission. After two more days of hacking, a panel of judges will rank the projects and select a grand prize winning team that will receive $20,000 Singapore dollars. The 2nd-5th place finalist teams will receive $15,000, $10,000, $5,000, and $5,000 Singapore dollars, respectively.

Hardcode begins on Friday, January 18th. Full contest details will be be announced via our mailing list, so subscribe there for more information.


Written by Parisa Tabriz, Security Team.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2013/01/calling-student-coders-hardcode-secure.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update

The Dev channel has been updated to 26.0.1384.2  for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame.  This build contains improvements in stability and fixes for few other issues. Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/01/dev-channel-update_15.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS


The Dev channel has been updated to 25.0.1364.33 (Platform version: 3428.65.0) for all Chrome OS devices. This build contains a numbers of stability and feature enhancements 

Some highlights of these changes are: 
  • Improved power consumption on arm devices 
  • UI fixes
  • Crash fixes
Known Issues:
  • In some situations, Chrome Sync may not sync any data. Workaround: Restart system and perform sync again (167090)
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue...’ in the Chrome menu (3 horizontal bars in the upper right corner of the browser).

Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/01/dev-channel-update-for-chrome-os_15.html

[Gd] Android Developer Story: Smule

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Android Developers Blog: Android Developer Story: Smule

Check out our latest Android developer story, this one from Smule, creators of AutoRap, Magic Piano, and Songify.



In this short video, the Smule team talks about their experiences launching on Android, the explosive global growth they’ve seen on Google Play, and some of the techniques they use to market and monetize their products effectively across the world.








Visit the Spotlight pages in the Android Developers site to see our growing list of developer stories.


URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/01/android-developer-story-smule.html

Monday, January 14, 2013

[Gd] Chrome Beta for Android Update

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Chrome Releases: Chrome Beta for Android Update

Chrome Beta for Android has been updated to 25.0.1364.33 on Google Play. This build will be rolling out over the next few hours. This update contains a number of fixes, including:
  • 164632 - Edit Bookmark is broken
  • 167351 - Youtube video controls are lost after returning from fullscreen
  • 167016 - Some Samsung Galaxy S2 freezes
  • 168062 - Double tapping on non-zoomable sites scrolls the page to the top briefly before returning to original position
  • 167379 - Sometimes tabswitcher is frozen
  • 166998 - Tab content stretched out while returning to it through side swipe gesture
  • 168632 - Crash - Stack Signature: TabAndroidImpl::FromWebContents
  • 168388 - Sync signed in info text's font size is too small
  • 168430 - Bookmark star icon doesn't turn grey/white immediately after bookmarking URL /deleting URL from bookmarks
Known Issues:
  • Performance is sluggish, noticeably on Galaxy Nexus and Nexus S
  • Frequent freeze on devices with specific versions of Qualcomm GPU driver
  • Text autosizing may break formatting on some sites
  • Video continues playing after exiting fullscreen on android phones
  • [HTC Droid DNA] Getting crash on tabswitcher mode
  • 163439 - yahoo.com page links are not working
  • 166233 - Cannot submit comments on facebook posts or pictures
  • 165244 - Text handler jumps or disappears when moving
  • 162486 - iframe scrolling broken
  • 158633: Tap disambiguation overaggressive
  • 169910 - Flickering while opening new tab
A partial list of changes in this build is available in the SVN revision log. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information about Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/01/chrome-beta-for-android-update.html

[Gd] Evolution of Renderscript Performance

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Android Developers Blog: Evolution of Renderscript Performance

Posted by R. Jason Sams, Android Renderscript Tech Lead



It’s been a year since the last blog post on Renderscript, and with the release of Android 4.2, it’s a good time to talk about the performance work that we’ve done since then. One of the major goals of this past year was to improve the performance of common image-processing operations with Renderscript.



Renderscipt optimizations chart

Figure 1. Renderscript image-processing benchmarks run on different Android platform versions (Android 4.0, 4.1, and 4.2) in CPU only on a Galaxy Nexus device.




Figure 2. Renderscript image-processing benchmarks comparing operations run with GPU + CPU to those run in CPU only on the same Nexus 10 device.



When you set out to improve performance, the first task is to measure it. To do this, we built a image-processing benchmark suite. The tests measure how long it takes to apply a given image processing operation to a roughly 1.7 million pixel bitmap. We then ran the benchmark using the same APK on the Galaxy Nexus and normalized the results from Ice Cream Sandwich to 1.0.



We made a few major improvements between ICS and Jelly Bean, which significantly reduced the overhead of short scripts as well as the cost of getting elements out of allocations. Going from Android 4.1 to Android 4.2, we added a number of performance improvements to the math library. Our hardware partners also made major contributions; ARM in particular provided numerous compiler improvements which greatly improved our ability to generate vector code.



Android 4.2 introduced another much more important change: For the first time on any mobile platform. we can use the GPU as a compute device. When run on a device that supports GPU compute, that same benchmark APK will run on the GPU. The chart in Figure 2 is normalized to the same basis as Figure 1.



The Cortex A15 in Nexus 10 is a very good CPU. However, that doesn’t mean we should leave resources idle. The Mali T604 is a very flexible and capable compute device capable of executing a large subset of RenderScript functionality. The green bar in Figure 2 shows what we can do when the Mali is enabled for RS compute. No effort is required on an app developer's part to enable this acceleration; the device will inspect each script and decide which processor to run things automatically. It’s important to note that some scripts can’t be run on the GPU, and such scripts will automatically run on the CPU.



The best part is it doesn’t end here. Performance work is an ongoing effort. RenderScript performance in applications will continue to improve over time as we continue to improve the platform.



To learn more about using Renderscript, see the Renderscript Computation developer's guide.


URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/01/evolution-of-renderscript-performance.html

[Gd] Test Engineers @ Google

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Google Testing Blog: Test Engineers @ Google

By Yvette Nameth

At Google, we’re very big into highlighting individuals’ strengths and using them to make teams and products better. However, we frequently get asked “What do Test Engineers (aka TEs) do?” I pause when I get this question since it’s hard to speak for my peers - I test Google Maps rendering, which is just one small portion of what Google’s Test Engineers test.

In order to get a clearer picture of what Test Engineers are responsible for, I chatted with three of my colleagues. We were able to identify the underlying Test Engineers’ similarities, while highlighting the differences.

So what common themes do Test Engineers specialize in at Google?

We’re product experts:
Test Engineers need to become a “go-to” person for how their product works and integrates with other Google products. (You aren’t expected to have this before working with a product, but you need to figure out how to become one on any product you work on!) TEs need to understand use cases and contracts with other services, products, and features. We aren’t expected to write unit tests for other engineer’s code; instead we ensure product quality on the functional and integration aspects of the product.

We’re flexible:
Test Engineers are required to switch tasks and re-prioritize frequently. From unplanned catastrophes, to shifting launch calendars, to people asking us questions, our work is filled with interrupts. We determine how to ensure quality in the face of the interrupts.

We also modify our tests based on the pace of the development and understand that there is no one right way to test a product. Test Engineers adapt tools to meet their needs and understand when a tool just can’t get the job done.

We’re clear communicators:
We have to be able to communicate via test plans, design docs, bugs, email and code. Every day we work with a wide variety of people in different roles: Software Engineers, Software Engineers in Test, Product Managers, Usability Researchers, Designers, Legal Counsel, etc. We need to address these different audiences to make sure we’re either gathering the information that will help us build better strategies or presenting feedback that will help influence the product.

We’re good at coordination:
We are people who use our “in between the product and user” status to coordinate integration testing efforts between products. We may coordinate manual testing efforts by our manual testers; or we may make sure that test gaps are being addressed by “someone” (Test Engineer, Software Engineer in Test, or Software Engineer). We put our product knowledge and communication together with a bit of coordination and make sure that bugs are looked at and the product is getting tested hourly / daily.

We have impact:
Google Test Engineers have big impact. We hold responsibility thinking of ways that our products could fail in “real scenarios”; and then we add tests to make sure that the worst won’t come to pass.

How big is this? Well, in my case, I’m responsible for making sure Google Maps represents a map that is useful to my relatives in the middle of rural Montana as well as my friends living in London, Paris or Sydney. When you add to that the billions of other users in different regions, speaking different languages and using the map for different reasons, I know that my testing is impacting their ability to get around and find out information about the physical world around them safely.

We code:
The other most common question is “Do you write code?” The answer is yes; Test Engineers at Google do code.

The three aspects that generally differentiate what a Test Engineer does day-to-day depend on the following:

Individual’s Strengths & Interests:
Everyone is different and every TE has different passions, strengths and areas of expertise. Thankfully, Google’s a big enough company that many different areas of testing are available, and we gravitate to testing products we like. All TEs start with core competencies in testing, coding, and algorithms. How a TE applies this knowledge varies.

The Type of Product:
Desktop, web app or mobile? Frontend or backend? The technologies that our products use and run on create a lot of variation in what and how we test.

The Product’s History / Lifecycle:
Early concept products don’t resemble those that exist in production. And the amount of testing that a product already has will determine what testing the TE is focused on. We work creating a test roadmap that parallels the product’s development cycle and addresses any testing gaps.

If you still want to know what the day in the life of a Test Engineer entails, we’ll never be able to give you a general answer for that. Instead I suggest that you check out what Alan Faulkner is doing or ask the next Google Test Engineer you meet.

Interested in joining the ranks of Test Engineers (or Software Engineers in Test)? Check out http://goo.gl/2RDKj

About the Contributors:
Albert Drona has been at Google for 5 years and is currently working on Google Maps for Mobile.
Jatin Shah has been at Google for 9 months on Google+.
Mohammad Khan has been at Google for 7 years and is currently working on Google+ releases.
About the Author:
Yvette Nameth has been at Google for 5 years and is currently working on Google Maps rendering.


URL: http://googletesting.blogspot.com/2013/01/test-engineers-google.html

[Gd] Chrome 25 Beta: Content Security Policy and Shadow DOM

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Chromium Blog: Chrome 25 Beta: Content Security Policy and Shadow DOM

Earlier today we released Chrome 25 on the Beta channel, and last week we introduced the Beta channel for Chrome for Android. To kick off the new year, we’ve packed these releases full of developer features. You’ll find all the updates described here in both the desktop and Android releases unless otherwise noted.

Unprefixed support for Content Security Policy
Content Security Policy (CSP) helps you reduce the risk of cross-site scripting and other content injection attacks. Starting in today’s Beta release, you can use the unprefixed Content-Security-Policy HTTP header to define a whitelist of trusted content sources. The browser will only execute or render resources from those sources. For example:


Prefixed support for Shadow DOM
Web Components is a set of cutting edge standards that will make it possible to build reusable widgets for the web. Shadow DOM is a key part of Web Components that enables DOM tree encapsulation. Without it, widgets may inadvertently break pages by using conflicting CSS selectors, class or id names, or JavaScript variables.

To get started, try the prefixed webkitCreateShadowRoot API available in today’s Beta release. Here’s an example from the HTML5 Rocks Shadow DOM Tutorial:


We think Shadow DOM is an important step forward for the web, so we've submitted a comprehensive test suite to the W3C to help ensure compatibility between implementations.

Other platform features
In addition to the highlights above, today’s Beta release introduces various other web platform features:
Last week’s Beta release of Chrome for Android also brought many features already available on other Chrome versions to Android as well. These features are described in detail in the announcement on the Chromium blog.

DevTools
Chrome Developer Tools help you debug the web. We’re rolling out several updates to desktop DevTools in today’s Beta release:
  • console.clear() helps keep your console clean.
  • The top toolbar is icon-free, though icons can be re-enabled in settings.
  • A timeline setting was added: “Show CPU activity on the ruler.” console.log formatting accepts multiple styles. For example: console.log("%cblue! %cgreen!", "color: blue;", "color: green;").
  • The docking toggle switches between most recent modes; “Dock to Right” is now the default alternative.
  • Emulate the media type to view print stylesheets and @media blocks.
  • The CodeMirror editor, replacing the default DevTools editor in Sources Panel, was updated to v3.
Stay in the loop

Visit chromestatus.com for a complete overview of Chrome’s developer features, and circle +Google Chrome Developers for more frequent updates.

We’ll update this post if things change, but at this point all these features are expected to land in the next Stable release. We’ve got a lot more in store for you this year, so get coding!

Posted by Eric Bidelman, Chrome Developer Advocate and Web Platform Enthusiast
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2013/01/content-security-policy-and-shadow-dom.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

The Chrome team is happy to announce the promotion of Chrome 25 to the beta channel for Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome Frame.   Chrome 25.0.1364.29 contains a number of new improvements, including:
A full list of changes in this build is available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2013/01/beta-channel-update_14.html