Friday, October 19, 2012

[Gd] Fridaygram: data centers, extinction period, Shuttle streets

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Google Developers Blog: Fridaygram: data centers, extinction period, Shuttle streets

Author Photo
By Scott Knaster, Google Developers Blog Editor

We have never said much about our data centers, but this week that changed in a very cool way. We launched a new site that takes you inside our data centers, with lots of great photos, a walkthrough courtesy of Street View, plus a WIRED story by Steven Levy about how our data centers have changed since the earliest days of Google.



Secret tip: there might be Easter eggs in the Street View tour.

Looking back a bit, about 250 million years ago, scientists have now figured out why there were no new species for 5 million years in the Early Triassic period. It turns out to be a simple answer: the weather was really hot. A study found that the average land temperature near the equator was 50 to 60°C, which was enough to keep new species from developing.

Returning to the present, this past week saw the final journey of the Space Shuttle Endeavour to its new museum home. This event provided some incredible juxtapositions as the spacecraft rolled down Los Angeles city streets past homes, restaurants, and onlookers. It was definitely not typical L.A. traffic.


The tagline of Google Developers Blog up there at the top is “News and insights on Google platforms, tools, and events”. This is somewhat less true on Friday, when we publish Fridaygram, a post containing stuff that’s simply interesting and nerdy.
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2012/10/fridaygram-data-centers-extinction.html

[Gd] New site ownership verification option in CWS

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Chromium Blog: New site ownership verification option in CWS

To publish an app in the Chrome Web Store, developers need to prove they own the domain that hosts their application. Until recently, the only way to do this was through Google’s Webmaster Tools. Today, we are simplifying the process further by allowing you use Google's site verification service to prove your association with a verified site.

Suppose you want to publish an app on the Chrome Web Store and have it associated with your company’s existing site, but you don’t have the ability to use any of the current verification methods e.g. you’re not allowed to upload a verification file to the root directory. The site verification service option in the edit page for each item listed in your Chrome Web Store developer dashboard allows you to request association of your app with your organization’s site:



When you choose an existing site from the drop-down menu or click “Add a new site”, the current registered owner for the site will receive a notification of your request to be associated. The owner can see who is making the request, and then approve or deny the request appropriately. That’s all there is to it! (Note: if this checkbox isn’t available, it may be because there’s no current owner of the site or you already have an outstanding association request).

We hope that this new feature will further streamline the process for publishing new apps on the Chrome Web Store, and allows you to focus more on developing your app and less on process. Have any questions or comments about using Google’s site verification service? You can reach us on our developer forum for store-related questions or head on over to the Webmaster Help forum.

Posted by Joe Marini, Developer Advocate
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2012/10/new-site-ownership-verification-option.html

Thursday, October 18, 2012

[Gd] Google Play Seller Support in India

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Android Developers Blog: Google Play Seller Support in India

Posted by Ibrahim Elbouchikhi, Product Manager on the Google Play team



Over the past year, Android device activations in India have jumped more than 400%, bringing millions of new users to Google Play and driving huge increases in app downloads. In the last six months, Android users in India downloaded more apps than in the previous three years combined, and India has rocketed to become the fourth-largest market worldwide for app downloads. To help developers capitalize on this tremendous growth, we are launching Google Play seller support in India.



Starting today, developers in India can sell paid applications, in-app products, and subscriptions in Google Play, with monthly payouts to their local bank accounts. They can take advantage of all of the tools offered by Google Play to monetize their products in the best way for their businesses, and they can target their products to the paid ecosystem of hundreds of millions of users in India and across the world.



If you are an Android developer based in India, you can get started right away by signing in to your Developer Console and setting up a Google Checkout merchant account. If your apps are already published as free, you can monetize them by adding in-app products or subscriptions. For new apps, you can publish the apps as paid, in addition to selling in-app products or subscriptions.



When you’ve prepared your apps and in-app products, you can price them in any available currencies, publish, and then receive payouts and financial data in your local currency. Visit the developer help center for complete details.



Along with seller support, we're also adding buyer’s currency support for India. We encourage developers everywhere to visit your Developer Console as soon as possible to set prices for your products in Indian Rupees and other new currencies (such as Russian Rubles).



Stay tuned for more announcements as we continue to roll out Google Play seller support to many more countries around the world.



URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2012/10/google-play-seller-support-in-india.html

[Gd] Thumbnails for your Custom File Types

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Google Apps Developer Blog: Thumbnails for your Custom File Types

Whenever you upload a file to Google Drive, we try to be smart and understand more about the new file. We index its text content, generate thumbnails and even use Google Goggles to recognize images. However, as any kind of files can be uploaded to Drive, there are cases where it is impossible for Drive to understand what the file content is. For instance, when inserting or updating a shortcut, the file content is not known to Drive and a thumbnail can’t be automatically generated.

Developers can now use the Google Drive SDK to provide thumbnail images for those files. The new thumbnail property on the File resource includes two sub-properties that you can set when uploading a new file or updating an existing one: “image” to contain the base64-encoded image data and “mimeType” to specify one of the supported image formats: “image/png”, “image/gif”, or “image/jpeg”.

As thumbnails must reflect the current status of the file, they are invalidated every time the file content changes, so your application should make sure to always upload a new thumbnail together with the updated content.

For more information and to learn about all requirements and recommendations about this new feature, please refer to the Uploading thumbnails section of the Google Drive SDK documentation, and don’t hesitate to ask us your technical questions!

Claudio Cherubino   profile | twitter | blog

Claudio is an engineer in the Google Drive Developer Relations team. Prior to Google, he worked as software developer, technology evangelist, community manager, consultant, technical translator and has contributed to many open-source projects. His current interests include Google APIs, new technologies and coffee.

URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2012/10/thumbnails-for-your-custom-file-types.html

[Gd] Building scalable social games on App Engine

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Google App Engine Blog: Building scalable social games on App Engine




Today’s guest blogger is Hernan Liendo, CTO of Zupcat, developer of social games played by millions of people worldwide.  Hernan shares his team’s experience using App Engine to build RaceTown, a multiplayer racing game.  




Choosing a cloud service provider




RaceTown is one of Zupcat’s most popular games; it has almost 900,000 monthly unique users, opens more than 40,000 connections via the Channel API per day, processes more than 15,000 queries per second and delivers terabytes of content everyday.  When deciding our architecture, we took into account several unique requirements of social games:




  • High uptime



  • Short loading time



  • Flexibility to deal with social network API changes



  • Ability to manage thousands of players, concurrently, from all over the world



  • Adjustment to capabilities and performance issues on different users’ computers



  • Ability to measure user actions to constantly improve the user experience



  • Hosting and delivering quality, beautiful game art



  • Complex game domains and algorithms: such as enemy adaptable performance, path finding, and 2D and 3D rendering





App Engine addresses these complicated issues.  It provides few tracerouting hops from almost anywhere in the world, great uptime, automatic scalability, no need for infrastructure monitoring and a reasonable price for content delivery.



Implementing App Engine














The diagram above shows a simplified view of our game architecture. We’ve discovered that App Engine is good to use not only as a game backend server, but also as a metrics server and content delivery network.  In addition, we periodically synchronize game state and retrieve data to and from the server.  



The App Engine Datastore is great because it has high availability and easily handles hundreds of millions of rows of data, which is important for social games.  For example, we  can easily scan the Datastore to present high score information and gamer stats to the user.  Additionally, because gamers tend to spend lot of time during a game session, we’ve found it’s helpful to cache game data. Using Memcache, we have significantly reduced Datastore API calls and lowered users’ waiting time.



Another tip for App Engine developers - although App Engine API failures are uncommon, you must be sure to write proper retrying code to minimize the possibility of exposing users to an application crash.  RaceTown performs almost a hundred million operations daily, and proper client side retrying algorithms have enabled us to reduce failure rates to very low levels.



Final thoughts



I believe that today there is no technology that matches App Engine.  You can run your code and store your data in the very same servers that Google uses.  Migrating your applications to this technology means you have to start thinking in a cloud-centric way and reinvent your architecture to stop working inside a relational database and classic clustered web server.



If you can achieve this, your products will be delivered using the same infrastructure that Google uses, without a huge corporate budget!










- Contributed by Hernan Liendo, @hernanliendo of Zupat, @zupcat


URL: http://googleappengine.blogspot.com/2012/10/building-scalable-social-games-on-app_18.html

[Gd] Beta and Dev Releases for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Beta and Dev Releases for Chrome OS


The Beta channel has been updated to 23.0.1271.41 (Platform versions: 2913.106.0 on Samsung Chromebook Series 5 550, Samsung Chromebook Series 5, Samsung Chromebox Series 3, Acer AC700, and Cr-48). This build contains a number of stability improvements. 

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.

Ben Henry and Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/10/beta-and-dev-releases-for-chrome-os.html

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

[Gd] A better developer experience for Native Client

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Google Developers Blog: A better developer experience for Native Client

Author PhotoBy Christian Stefansen, Native Client Team

Native Client (NaCl) enables you to write high-performance apps that run your C and C++ code in the browser. With the new Native Client add-in for Microsoft Visual Studio and the new Native Client debugger it just got a lot easier.

The Visual Studio add-in makes it easy to set up, build, run, and debug your app as a Pepper plug-in and as a Native Client module. If you are porting an existing application to Native Client, building as a Pepper plug-in is a convenient intermediate stage for development enabling you to gradually rewrite the app to use the Pepper APIs (video).


The Native Client debugger, affectionately called nacl-gdb, works on Windows, Mac, and Linux and is now available in the SDK. So whatever your development platform, you can now spend more time coding features and less time chasing bugs with printf.

Following the Native Client philosophy of being OS-independent and open source, nacl-gdb is based on... well... gdb! For those of you who are not excited by a text interface, the Visual Studio add-in makes interacting with the debugger easier. If you use a different development environment that can interact with gdb, you can point it to nacl-gdb and use the same commands plus some additional NaCl-specific commands.


Whether you’re an existing Native Client developer or thinking about using Native Client for your next project, now is a great time to grab the SDK, write an amazing app, and quickly squash any bugs you find. We look forward to questions on Stack Overflow and ideas and comments in the discussion forum.


Christian Stefansen is the Product Manager for Native Client and Pepper (PPAPI). When he is not busy planning new features for Native Client, he likes traveling and writing. He is currently writing a book about India.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2012/10/a-better-developer-experience-for.html

[Gd] A better developer experience for Native Client

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Chromium Blog: A better developer experience for Native Client

Native Client (NaCl) enables you to write high-performance apps that run your C and C++ code in the browser. With the new Native Client add-in for Microsoft Visual Studio and the new Native Client debugger it just got a lot easier.

The Visual Studio add-in makes it easy to set up, build, run, and debug your app as a Pepper plug-in and as a Native Client module. If you are porting an existing application to Native Client, building as a Pepper plug-in is a convenient intermediate stage for development enabling you to gradually rewrite the app to use the Pepper APIs (video).



The Native Client debugger, affectionately called nacl-gdb, works on Windows, Mac, and Linux and is now available in the SDK. So whatever your development platform, you can now spend more time coding features and less time chasing bugs with printf.

Following the Native Client philosophy of being OS-independent and open source, nacl-gdb is based on... well... gdb! For those of you who are not excited by a text interface, the Visual Studio add-in makes interacting with the debugger easier. If you use a different development environment that can interact with gdb, you can point it to nacl-gdb and use the same commands plus some additional NaCl-specific commands.



Whether you’re an existing Native Client developer or thinking about using Native Client for your next project, now is a great time to grab the SDK, write an amazing app, and quickly squash any bugs you find. We look forward to questions on Stack Overflow and ideas and comments in the discussion forum.

Posted by Christian Stefansen, Product Manager
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2012/10/a-better-developer-experience-for.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

The Beta channel has been updated to 23.0.1271.40 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and ChromeFrame platforms.

All
  • Updated V8 - 3.13.7.4
  • Fixed web spell check (Issue: 144863)
Windows
  • Fixed issues with HW video decoder (Issue: 153094)
  • Several Win8-specific enhancements and fixes (Issues: 155625, 154806)
Mac
  • Fixed several known top crashes (Issue: 153283139164153411)
  • Fixed several known issues with flash and pepper flash (Issues: 151716)
  • Fixed bad audio with USB headset (Issue: 152780)
More details about additional changes are available in the svn log of all revisions. If you find new issues, please let us know by filing a bug. Want to change to another Chrome release channel? Find out how.

Karen Grunberg

Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/10/beta-channel-update_17.html

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

[Gd] Dev Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update

The Dev channel has been updated to 24.0.1297.0 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame.  This build contains following updates:

All

  • Updated V8 - 3.14.4.1
  • Updated WebKit - 537.16
  • Fixed tab character in text field when pressed Tab in a <browser> tag. (Issue: 149859)
  • Fixed omnibox suggestion: restore selection on WM_IME_ENDCOMPOSITION (Issue: 154379)
  • Fixed text that goes out of the box under Related section after an app was installed. (Issue: 154797)
  • Fixed Web Store icon (Issue: 149887)

Windows
  • Updated styling for Web Intents windows
  • Setting preference to launch in Metro on Windows 8 will no longer cause Chrome to launch in Metro mode upon uninstall.

Mac
  • Fixed a bug where Chrome would use an outdated version of Pepper Flash (Issue: 151716)
  • [r161874] Fixed a bug where Chrome would fail to quit if at least two windows were open and  a page had a beforeunload handler (Issue: 118424)
  • Fixed browser hang when webcam used on facebook with OSX flapper. (Issue: 152757)

Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/10/dev-channel-update_16.html

[Gd] A new tool to disavow links

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Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: A new tool to disavow links

Webmaster level: Advanced

Today we’re introducing a tool that enables you to disavow links to your site. If you’ve been notified of a manual spam action based on “unnatural links” pointing to your site, this tool can help you address the issue. If you haven’t gotten this notification, this tool generally isn’t something you need to worry about.

First, a quick refresher. Links are one of the most well-known signals we use to order search results. By looking at the links between pages, we can get a sense of which pages are reputable and important, and thus more likely to be relevant to our users. This is the basis of PageRank, which is one of more than 200 signals we rely on to determine rankings. Since PageRank is so well-known, it’s also a target for spammers, and we fight linkspam constantly with algorithms and by taking manual action.

If you’ve ever been caught up in linkspam, you may have seen a message in Webmaster Tools about “unnatural links” pointing to your site. We send you this message when we see evidence of paid links, link exchanges, or other link schemes that violate our quality guidelines. If you get this message, we recommend that you remove from the web as many spammy or low-quality links to your site as possible. This is the best approach because it addresses the problem at the root. By removing the bad links directly, you’re helping to prevent Google (and other search engines) from taking action again in the future. You’re also helping to protect your site’s image, since people will no longer find spammy links pointing to your site on the web and jump to conclusions about your website or business.

If you’ve done as much as you can to remove the problematic links, and there are still some links you just can’t seem to get down, that’s a good time to visit our new Disavow links page. When you arrive, you’ll first select your site.


You’ll then be prompted to upload a file containing the links you want to disavow.


The format is straightforward. All you need is a plain text file with one URL per line. An excerpt of a valid file might look like the following:

# Contacted owner of spamdomain1.com on 7/1/2012 to
# ask for link removal but got no response
domain:spamdomain1.com
# Owner of spamdomain2.com removed most links, but missed these
http://www.spamdomain2.com/contentA.html
http://www.spamdomain2.com/contentB.html
http://www.spamdomain2.com/contentC.html

In this example, lines that begin with a pound sign (#) are considered comments and Google ignores them. The “domain:” keyword indicates that you’d like to disavow links from all pages on a particular site (in this case, “spamdomain1.com”). You can also request to disavow links on specific pages (in this case, three individual pages on spamdomain2.com). We currently support one disavowal file per site and the file is shared among site owners in Webmaster Tools. If you want to update the file, you’ll need to download the existing file, modify it, and upload the new one. The file size limit is 2MB.

One great place to start looking for bad links is the “Links to Your Site” feature in Webmaster Tools. From the homepage, select the site you want, navigate to Traffic > Links to Your Site > Who links the most > More, then click one of the download buttons. This file lists pages that link to your site. If you click “Download latest links,” you’ll see dates as well. This can be a great place to start your investigation, but be sure you don’t upload the entire list of links to your site -- you don’t want to disavow all your links!

To learn more about the feature, check out our Help Center, and we’d welcome your comments and questions in our forum. You’ll also find a video about the tool and a quick Q&A below.





We would reiterate that we built this tool for advanced webmasters only. We don't recommend using this tool unless you are sure that you need to disavow some links to your site and you know exactly what you're doing.

Q: Will most sites need to use this tool?
A: No. The vast, vast majority of sites do not need to use this tool in any way. If you’re not sure what the tool does or whether you need to use it, you probably shouldn’t use it.

Q: If I disavow links, what exactly does that do? Does Google definitely ignore them?
A: This tool allows you to indicate to Google which links you would like to disavow, and Google will typically ignore those links. Much like with rel=”canonical”, this is a strong suggestion rather than a directiveGoogle reserves the right to trust our own judgment for corner cases, for examplebut we will typically use that indication from you when we assess links.

Q: How soon after I upload a file will the links be ignored?
A: We need to recrawl and reindex the URLs you disavowed before your disavowals go into effect, which can take multiple weeks.

Q: Can this tool be used if I'm worried about "negative SEO"?
A: The primary purpose of this tool is to help clean up if you've hired a bad SEO or made mistakes in your own link-building. If you know of bad link-building done on your behalf (e.g., paid posts or paid links that pass PageRank), we recommend that you contact the sites that link to you and try to get links taken off the public web first. You’re also helping to protect your site’s image, since people will no longer find spammy links and jump to conclusions about your website or business. If, despite your best efforts, you're unable to get a few backlinks taken down, that's a good time to use the Disavow Links tool.

In general, Google works hard to prevent other webmasters from being able to harm your ranking. However, if you're worried that some backlinks might be affecting your site's reputation, you can use the Disavow Links tool to indicate to Google that those links should be ignored. Again, we build our algorithms with an eye to preventing negative SEO, so the vast majority of webmasters don't need to worry about negative SEO at all.

Q: I didn’t create many of the links I’m seeing. Do I still have to do the work to clean up these links?
A: Typically not. Google normally gives links appropriate weight, and under normal circumstances you don't need to give Google any additional information about your links. A typical use case for this tool is if you've done link building that violates our quality guidelines, Google has sent you a warning about unnatural links, and despite your best efforts there are some links that you still can't get taken down.

Q: I uploaded some good links. How can I undo uploading links by mistake?
A: To modify which links you would like to ignore, download the current file of disavowed links, change it to include only links you would like to ignore, and then re-upload the file. Please allow time for the new file to propagate through our crawling/indexing system, which can take several weeks.

Q: Should I create a links file as a preventative measure even if I haven’t gotten a notification about unnatural links to my site?
A: If your site was affected by the Penguin algorithm update and you believe it might be because you built spammy or low-quality links to your site, you may want to look at your site's backlinks and disavow links that are the result of link schemes that violate Google's guidelines.

Q: If I upload a file, do I still need to file a reconsideration request?
A: Yes, if you’ve received notice that you have a manual action on your site. The purpose of the Disavow Links tool is to tell Google which links you would like ignored. If you’ve received a message about a manual action on your site, you should clean things up as much as you can (which includes taking down any spammy links you have built on the web). Once you've gotten as many spammy links taken down from the web as possible, you can use the Disavow Links tool to indicate to Google which leftover links you weren't able to take down. Wait for some time to let the disavowed links make their way into our system. Finally, submit a reconsideration request so the manual webspam team can check whether your site is now within Google's quality guidelines, and if so, remove any manual actions from your site.

Q: Do I need to disavow links from example.com and example.co.uk if they're the same company?
A: Yes. If you want to disavow links from multiple domains, you'll need to add an entry for each domain.

Q: What about www.example.com vs. example.com (without the "www")?
A: Technically these are different URLs. The disavow links feature tries to be granular. If content that you want to disavow occurs on multiple URLs on a site, you should disavow each URL that has the link that you want to disavow. You can always disavow an entire domain, of course.

Q: Can I disavow something.example.com to ignore only links from that subdomain?
A: For the most part, yes. For most well-known freehosts (e.g. wordpress.com, blogspot.com, tumblr.com, and many others), disavowing "domain:something.example.com" will disavow links only from that subdomain. If a freehost is very new or rare, we may interpret this as a request to disavow all links from the entire domain. But if you list a subdomain, most of the time we will be able to ignore links only from that subdomain.


Posted by Jonathan Simon, Webmaster Trends Analyst
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2012/10/a-new-tool-to-disavow-links.html

[Gd] Storing Items in Drive - BLOBs vs. Shortcuts

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Google Apps Developer Blog: Storing Items in Drive - BLOBs vs. Shortcuts

The Drive SDK allows apps to store all kinds of files and file-like items in user-managed cloud storage. Files can be standard document formats like PDF, images, video & audio clips, or even your proprietary application data files. Storing files in Drive makes it easy for users to organize, search, and securely share them with their coworkers, friends, or family.

However, some applications work better with document or application data stored in a database. For example, let’s imagine a modern, web-based project management tool that provides lots of awesome features via data objects that are assembled dynamically at runtime for presentation to the user. In such cases, there is no single file to store all the data that comprises the project -- though there is of course a named “file” item that users will want to save and list in their Drive. Drive applications like this can create file-like entries called shortcuts that allow users to organize, access, and share items as if they were files stored in Drive.

Creating Shortcuts

Creating a shortcut is not much different than creating a regular file. Just set the MIME type to application/vnd.google-apps.drive-sdk, and make sure you don’t upload any actual content in the call to files.insert. Here’s an example of creating a shortcut using Python:


shortcut = {
'title': 'My project plan',
'mimetype': 'application/vnd.google-apps.drive-sdk',
'description': 'Project plan for the launch of our new product!'
}
file = service.files().insert(body=shortcut).execute()
key = file['id'] # Key to use when re-opening shortcuts

For examples in other supported languages, see the Drive SDK documentation.

Opening shortcuts in Drive always launches the application that created them. Shortcuts can even be synchronized to the desktop. Opening a shortcut from the desktop will launch the application that created it in a new browser tab.

Sharing and Security

Shortcuts require special consideration when it comes to sharing and security. Since the actual content is not stored in Drive, applications are responsible for enforcing permissions and ensuring that only authorized users are allowed to read or update content. Follow these best practices when working with shortcuts:

  • Always call files.get with the current user’s access token to verify the user has access to the content.
  • Restrict user actions based on the userPermission property of the file and disable saves if the user only has reader or commenter roles.

Honoring permissions not only ensures the protection of user data, but also provides a consistent user experience and added value to Drive applications. Users should be able to safely share an item in Drive without worrying about the particular implementation details of the application that created it.

If you have any questions about shortcuts, don’t hesitate to ask us on our Stack Overflow tag, google-drive-sdk


Steven Bazyl   profile | twitter | events

Steve is a Developer Advocate for Google Drive, Google Apps, and the Google Apps Marketplace. He enjoys helping developers find ways to integrate their apps and bring added value to users.


URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2012/10/storing-items-in-drive-blobs-vs.html

[Gd] Celebrating Dart’s birthday with the first release of the Dart SDK

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Chromium Blog: Celebrating Dart’s birthday with the first release of the Dart SDK

A year ago we released a technology preview of Dart, a project that includes a modern language, libraries and tools for building complex web applications. Today, after plowing through thousands of bug reports and feature requests from the web community, a new, more stable and comprehensive version of Dart is now available and ready to use.

With this version of the Dart SDK, we’ve made several improvements and added many features:
Over the following months, we will continue to work hard to evolve the SDK, improve Dart’s robustness and performance, and fine-tune the language while maintaining backwards compatibility.



You can download the Dart Editor from dartlang.org. It comes with a copy of the open-source SDK and Dartium. Thanks again for all your feedback - keep it coming.

Posted by Lars Bak, Software Engineer
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2012/10/dart-m1-release.html

[Gd] Celebrating Dart’s birthday with the first release of the Dart SDK

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Google Developers Blog: Celebrating Dart’s birthday with the first release of the Dart SDK

Author PhotoBy Lars Bak, Software Engineer

A year ago we released a technology preview of Dart, a project that includes a modern language, libraries and tools for building complex web applications. Today, after plowing through thousands of bug reports and feature requests from the web community, a new, more stable and comprehensive version of Dart is now available and ready to use.



With this version of the Dart SDK, we’ve made several improvements and added many features:
Over the following months, we will continue to work hard to evolve the SDK, improve Dart’s robustness and performance, and fine-tune the language while maintaining backwards compatibility.

Dart birthday logo

You can download the Dart Editor from dartlang.org. It comes with a copy of the open-source SDK and Dartium. Thanks again for all your feedback – keep it coming.


Lars Bak is a veteran virtual machinist, leaving marks on several software systems: Beta, Self, Strongtalk, Sun's HotSpot and CLDC HI, OOVM Smalltalk, and V8.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2012/10/celebrating-darts-birthday-with-first.html

Monday, October 15, 2012

[Gd] New Google Play Developer Console Available to Everyone

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Android Developers Blog: New Google Play Developer Console Available to Everyone

Posted by Eva-Lotta Lamm, Riccardo Govoni, and Ellie Powers of the Google Play team



We've been working on a new Google Play Developer Console, centered around how you make and publish apps, to create a foundation for the exciting features we have planned for the future. Earlier this year at Google I/O, we demoed the new version (video). Since then, we've been testing it out with tens of thousands of developers, reviewing their feedback and making adjustments.



Today, we’re very happy to announce that all developers can now try the new Google Play Developer Console. At its core, the Developer Console is how you put your app in front of hundreds of millions of Android users around the world, and track how your app is doing. We hope that with a streamlined publishing flow, new language options, and new user ratings statistics, you’ll have better tools for delivering great Android apps that delight users.



Sleeker, faster, easier to navigate



You spend a lot of time in the Developer Console, so we overhauled the interface for you. It's bright and appealing to look at, easy to find your way around using navigation and search, and it loads quickly even if you have a lot of apps.



Designed for speed. Quickly locate the app data and business information you use every day. More screenshots »




Track user ratings over time, and find ways to improve



One of the most important things you'll be able to do is track the success of your app over time — it's how you continue to iterate and make beautiful, successful apps. You'll see new statistics about your user ratings: a graph showing changes over time, for both the all-time average user rating and new user ratings that come in on a certain day. As with other statistics, you'll be able to break down the data by device, country, language, carrier, Android version, and app version. For example, after optimizing your app for tablets, you could track your ratings on popular tablets.



New charts for user ratings. You can now track user ratings over time and across countries. More screenshots »




Better publishing workflow



We've completely revamped and streamlined the app publishing process to give you more time to build great apps. You can start with either an APK or an app name, and you can save before you have all of the information. You can also now see differences between the new and old versions of an app, making it easy to catch unintentional changes before you publish a new version to your users.



More languages for listings, with automated translations



You'll also enjoy a new app publishing flow and the ability to publish your app listing in 49 languages. Once you've saved any change to your application in the new Developer Console, your users will have the option of viewing an automatic translation of your listing on the web today and soon on devices — no additional action on your part is needed.



How can you try the new version?



Go to your Developer Console and click on “Try the new version” in the header or go directly to the new version. If you prefer the new version, don't forget to bookmark the new URL.



Please note that we're not quite done yet, so the following advanced features are not yet supported in the new Google Play Developer Console: multiple APK support, APK Expansion Files and announcements. To use these features, you can click “Switch back” in the header at any time to return to the old version.



Click the “Feedback” link in the header to let us know what you think, so that we can continue to improve your experience as a Google Play developer. Thank you for all of the feedback so far.





URL: http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2012/10/new-google-play-developer-console.html