Saturday, September 15, 2012

[Gd] Retiring the Google Documents List API v3

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Google Developers Blog: Retiring the Google Documents List API v3

Author PhotoBy Ali Afshar, Tech Lead, Google Drive Developer Relations

Cross-posted from the Google Apps Developer Blog

With the arrival of the new Google Drive API v2, we are deprecating the Google Documents List API v3. We are confident that the Google Drive API covers all the functionality of the Documents List API, in addition to adding many improvements, including Drive UI Integration, a finer grained security model, and a better client library experience.

What does this mean for your app?

The Documents List API v3 will remain in action for more than a year, as per our deprecation policy, so there’s no rush, but we encourage you to migrate your code to the new platform. Documentation is available with samples in multiple languages and a migration guide outlining some of the major transition points.

If you have any questions or issues, please ask them on StackOverflow.com, where our team is waiting to hear from you.


Ali Afshar is an eternal open source advocate. He contributes to a number of open source applications, and is the author of the PIDA Python IDE. Once an intensive care physician, he has a special interest in all aspects of technology for healthcare.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor

URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2012/09/retiring-google-documents-list-api-v3.html

Friday, September 14, 2012

[Gd] Answering the top questions from government webmasters

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Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Answering the top questions from government webmasters

Webmaster level: Beginner - Intermediate

Government sites, from city to state to federal agencies, are extremely important to Google Search. For one thing, governments have a lot of content — and government websites are often the canonical source of information that’s important to citizens. Around 20 percent of Google searches are for local information, and local governments are experts in their communities.

That’s why I’ve spoken at the National Association of Government Webmasters (NAGW) national conference for the past few years. It’s always interesting speaking to webmasters about search, but the people running government websites have particular concerns and questions. Since some questions come up frequently I thought I’d share this FAQ for government websites.

Question 1: How do I fix an incorrect phone number or address in search results or Google Maps?

Although managing their agency’s site is plenty of work, government webmasters are often called upon to fix problems found elsewhere on the web too. By far the most common question I’ve taken is about fixing addresses and phone numbers in search results. In this case, government site owners really can do it themselves, by claiming their Google+ Local listing. Incorrect or missing phone numbers, addresses, and other information can be fixed by claiming the listing.

Most locations in Google Maps have a Google+ Local listing — businesses, offices, parks, landmarks, etc. I like to use the San Francisco Main Library as an example: it has contact info, detailed information like the hours they’re open, user reviews and fun extras like photos. When we think users are searching for libraries in San Francisco, we may display a map and a listing so they can find the library as quickly as possible.

If you work for a government agency and want to claim a listing, we recommend using a shared Google Account with an email address at your .gov domain if possible. Usually, ownership of the page is confirmed via a phone call or post card.

Question 2: I’ve claimed the listing for our office, but I have 43 different city parks to claim in Google Maps, and none of them have phones or mailboxes. How do I claim them?

Use the bulk uploader! If you have 10 or more listings / addresses to claim at the same time, you can upload a specially-formatted spreadsheet. Go to www.google.com/places/, click the "Get started now" button, and then look for the "bulk upload" link.

If you run into any issues, use the Verification Troubleshooter.

Question 3: We're moving from a .gov domain to a new .com domain. How should we move the site?

We have a Help Center article with more details, but the basic process involves the following steps:
  • Make sure you have both the old and new domain verified in the same Webmaster Tools account.
  • Use a 301 redirect on all pages to tell search engines your site has moved permanently.
    • Don't do a single redirect from all pages to your new home page — this gives a bad user experience.
    • If there's no 1:1 match between pages on your old site and your new site (recommended), try to redirect to a new page with similar content.
    • If you can't do redirects, consider cross-domain canonical links.
  • Make sure to check if the new location is crawlable by Googlebot using the Fetch as Google feature in Webmaster Tools.
  • Use the Change of Address tool in Webmaster Tools to notify Google of your site's move.
  • Have a look at the Links to Your Site in Webmaster Tools and inform the important sites that link to your content about your new location.
  • We recommend not implementing other major changes at the same time, like large-scale content, URL structure, or navigational updates.
  • To help Google pick up new URLs faster, use the Fetch as Google tool to ask Google to crawl your new site, and submit a Sitemap listing the URLs on your new site.
  • To prevent confusion, it's best to retain control of your old site’s domain and keep redirects in place for as long as possible — at least 180 days.
What if you’re moving just part of the site? This question came up too — for example, a city might move its "Tourism and Visitor Info" section to its own domain.

In that case, many of the same steps apply: verify both sites in Webmaster Tools, use 301 redirects, clean up old links, etc. In this case you don't need to use the Change of Address form in Webmaster Tools since only part of your site is moving. If for some reason you’ll have some of the same content on both sites, you may want to include a cross-domain canonical link pointing to the preferred domain.

Question 4: We've done a ton of work to create unique titles and descriptions for pages. How do we get Google to pick them up?

First off, that's great! Better titles and descriptions help users decide to click through to get the information they need on your page. The government webmasters I’ve spoken with care a lot about the content and organization of their sites, and work hard to provide informative text for users.

Google's generation of page titles and descriptions (or "snippets") is completely automated and takes into account both the content of a page as well as references to it that appear on the web. Changes are picked up as we recrawl your site. But you can do two things to let us know about URLs that have changed:
  • Submit an updated XML Sitemap so we know about all of the pages on your site.
  • In Webmaster Tools, use the Fetch as Google feature on a URL you’ve updated. Then you can choose to submit it to the index.
    • You can choose to submit all of the linked pages as well — if you’ve updated an entire section of your site, you might want to submit the main page or an index page for that section to let us know about a broad collection of URLs.

Question 5: How do I get into the YouTube government partner program?

For this question, I have bad news, good news, and then even better news. On the one hand, the government partner program has been discontinued. But don’t worry, because most of the features of the program are now available to your regular YouTube account. For example, you can now upload videos longer than 10 minutes.

Did I say I had even better news? YouTube has added a lot of functionality useful for governments in the past year: I hope this FAQ has been helpful, but I’m sure I haven’t covered everything government webmasters want to know. I highly recommend our Webmaster Academy, where you can learn all about making your site search-engine friendly. If you have a specific question, please feel free to add a question in the comments or visit our really helpful Webmaster Central Forum.

Posted by , Search Quality Team
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2012/09/answering-top-questions-from-government.html

[Gd] Fridaygram: Course Builder, superhydrophobia, Easter Bacon

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Google Developers Blog: Fridaygram: Course Builder, superhydrophobia, Easter Bacon

Author Photo
By Scott Knaster, Google Developers Blog Editor

This summer Google ran an online course called Power Searching with Google. The course was so popular that Peter Norvig and the Research at Google people who created it decided to generalize the course code and framework, and make it into Course Builder, an open source project that’s now available. The Research team points out that Course Builder is an experiment, and there’s a lot of work still to be done, but if you’re interested in this approach, you can join a bunch of schools that are considering using Course Builder.

Speaking of research, you might think that we have little new to learn about the very basic task of boiling water, but of course that’s not true. Researchers at several schools around the world recently collaborated to produce a way to boil water without producing bubbles.



This discovery has many potential practical applications. It could be used to prevent vapor buildup that can cause explosions, or could even lead to discoveries of ways to reduce surface drag or prevent frost from forming. But most important, it’s really, really cool.

Finally, here’s a fun new Easter egg (or is it a valuable new search tool?). In a Google search box, enter the name of your favorite actor, followed by Bacon number. (If you’re unfamiliar with the Bacon number phenomenon, you can find out more.) Maybe you’ll get some ideas about movies to see over the weekend!


Each week our Fridaygram presents cool things from Google and elsewhere that you might not have heard about. Some Fridaygram items aren't related to developer topics, but all of them are interesting to us nerds. For extra credit this week, you can check into the small set of people who have a defined ErdÅ‘s–Bacon number.
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2012/09/fridaygram-course-builder.html

[Gd] The YouTube API on Stack Overflow

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YouTube API Blog: The YouTube API on Stack Overflow

Many of you are already familiar with the terrific Stack Overflow website, which has become the de facto resource on the web for all types of programming questions. And many of you have been asking YouTube API questions on Stack Overflow for some time now, but haven’t received any official responses from the YouTube API Developer Relations team. That’s because, for the past five years or so, our focus has been on providing developer support via our dedicated Google Group. We’ve decided that instead of continuing to maintain a dedicated Google Group for YouTube API questions, it would help more users if we focused on responding to Stack Overflow posts.

We encourage all developers who have questions about the YouTube API to start posting on Stack Overflow today using the tag youtube-api. You can use this new question template to pre-populate the tag for you so that you don’t forget. While we’ll do our best to find and answer relevant questions that aren’t tagged with youtube-api, you’d be making our job easier (and you’d get a quicker answer) if you tag things correctly from the get-go.

Stack Overflow prides itself in being a destination for questions and answers, and not a place to file bug reports or feature requests. We ask that developers do not post on Stack Overflow for those sorts of things, and instead make use of the templates we have for filing a bug or filing a feature request in our existing public issue tracker. (Be sure to check the list of existing open issues before filing a duplicate.)

On October 15, we’ll be switching the existing discussion Google Group into archive-only mode, meaning that it will no longer accept any new posts. You don’t have to wait until October 15 to start asking questions on Stack Overflow or to file reports in the issue tracker, though.

For those developers who mainly “lurked” in the discussion Google Group and used it as a way of getting official announcements about the YouTube API, we have a number of other communication channels to recommend. Subscribing to this blog’s RSS feed is a great idea, for instance. You can also follow us on Google+ at http://google.com/+YouTubeDev. If you’d like to submit a question to one of our weekly YouTube Developers Live broadcasts, you can do that for the next upcoming scheduled show. Finally, for those who prefer to get updates via email, we will be keeping the announce-only Google Group active, and we’ll continue to post important messages there.

Cheers,
Jeff Posnick, YouTube API Team
URL: http://apiblog.youtube.com/2012/09/the-youtube-api-on-stack-overflow.html

[Gd] Retiring the Google Documents List API v3

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Google Apps Developer Blog: Retiring the Google Documents List API v3

With the arrival of the new Google Drive API v2, we are deprecating the Google Documents List API v3. We are confident that the Google Drive API covers all the functionality of the Documents List API, in addition to adding many improvements, including Drive UI Integration, a finer grained security model, and a better client library experience.

What does this mean for your app?

The Documents List API v3 will remain in action for more than a year, as per our deprecation policy, so there’s no rush, but we encourage you to migrate your code to the new platform. Documentation is available with samples in multiple languages and a migration guide outlining some of the major transition points.

If you have any questions or issues, please ask them on StackOverflow.com, where our team is waiting to hear from you.

Ali Afshar profile | twitter

Tech Lead, Google Drive Developer Relations. As an eternal open source advocate, he contributes to a number of open source applications, and is the author of the PIDA Python IDE. Once an intensive care physician, he has a special interest in all aspects of technology for healthcare

URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2012/09/retiring-google-documents-list-api-v3.html

Thursday, September 13, 2012

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

The Beta channel has been updated to 22.0.1229.56 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.  A complete log of what changed can be found in the svn revision log.  Instructions and download links for our different release channels are available on the Chromium wiki.  If you find what you think is a new bug, please file it in our issue tracker.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/09/beta-channel-update_13.html

[Gd] Python Client Library for Google APIs is out of Beta

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Google Developers Blog: Python Client Library for Google APIs is out of Beta

Antonio
Joe

By Joe Gregorio and Antonio Fuentes, Google Developer Team

We have awesome news for Python developers. The Python Client Library for Google APIs is no longer in Beta! The Python Client Library has been augmented with many great features since its Beta launch. It now supports OAuth 2.0 service accounts, upload of media resources, batching of requests, asynchronous requests, resumable media upload, feed paging and many other features.

We encourage you to check out the new documentation for the client library, which not only has brand new content, but also has a slick new look and is now hosted on developers.google.com.

If you are building a Python application that uses Google APIs, we strongly recommend you use this client library. First, the library makes it simple to call any RESTful Google API and grab the data returned by the call. Also, the client library handles the OAuth 2.0 authentication protocol and all errors for you without the need to write any additional code.

Making a call to a RESTful API using the Google APIs Client Library for Python is simple. You start by constructing an http object to sign all requests with OAuth 2.0 credentials:

http = httplib2.Http()
http = credentials.authorize(http)


You then create a service object that knows how to talk to a Google API. In this example, we use the Google+ API:

service = build("plus", "v1", http=http)

You then access a collection of resources in the API by simply calling its name. The collection object that is returned has all the methods that a collection understands. Here we execute a GET request on the people collection passing the userID parameter:

person = service.people().get(userId='me').execute()
print "Your name is: %s" % person['displayName']


To get started, check out the documentation for the client library, which contains instructions for how to download and install it. As always, your feedback is welcome!


Joe Gregorio is a Software Engineer. In the past five years at Google he’s worked on APIs, Google App Engine, Google Wave, and now has come full circle and is back working on APIs.

Antonio Fuentes is a Product Manager focusing on developer-facing technologies. He has experience launching products in the cloud computing, infrastructure, and virtualization spaces.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2012/09/python-client-library-for-google-apis.html

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

[Gd] Chrome for Android Update

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Chrome Releases: Chrome for Android Update

The stable channel of Chrome for Android has been updated to 18.0.1025308. It is now available for download on Google Play and in the Google Play Store on your mobile devices, on Android 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich, or later.  The new update includes important security and stability fixes.

Security fixes and rewards:
Please see the Chromium security page for more detail. Note that the referenced bugs may be kept private until a majority of our users are up to date with the fix.
  • [$500] [138210] Medium Information and credential disclosure by file:// URLs. Credit to Artem Chaykin.
  • [$500] [138035] Medium Current-tab cross-application scripting (UXSS). Credit to Artem Chaykin.
  • [$500] [144813] Medium UXSS via Intent extra data. Credit to Takeshi Terada.
  • [$500] [144820] Medium Information and credential disclosure by file:// URLs. Credit to Takeshi Terada.
  • [$500] [137532] Medium Android APIs exposed to JavaScript. Credit to Takeshi Terada.
  • [$500] [144866] Medium Bypassing same-origin policy for local files with symlinks. Credit to Takeshi Terada.
  • [$500] [141889] Medium Cookie theft by malicious local Android app. Credit to Takeshi Terada.
Known issues are available on the Chrome support site. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug. More information on Chrome for Android is available on the Chrome site.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/09/chrome-for-android-update.html

[Gd] Announcing the Google Drive Installation Scope

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Google Apps Developer Blog: Announcing the Google Drive Installation Scope

Not long after the Drive SDK was first released, we started receiving requests for a simpler developer and user experience. It took too long for developers to get started, and users were sometimes confused by the ways apps were installed. We’re now announcing a new feature that helps address these concerns: the Drive installation scope.

As the name suggests, this new OAuth 2.0 scope lets users install an app by approving an access request. Along with all the other levels of access you can request from users, it’s now possible to ask users for permission to install your app in their Drive.

This means that an app, or an app’s promotion page, could present an option to “Install this app in Google Drive,” and then users who select this option would interact with an OAuth 2.0 dialog that requests the installation scope. For example, the following script creates an “Add to Google Drive” button that could be embedded in a web page:


<script src="https://apis.google.com/js/client.js"></script>
<script>
var CLIENT_ID = '123456789.apps.googleusercontent.com'
function installDriveApp() {
gapi.auth.authorize({
client_id: CLIENT_ID,
scope: 'https://www.googleapis.com/auth/drive.install',
immediate: false
}, function(authResult) { // Callback when installation complete });
}
</script>
<button onclick="installDriveApp();">Add to Google Drive</button>

On clicking this button, the user sees a standard OAuth 2.0 dialog box like the following (text for the installation scope is expanded in this example):

When the user approves these scopes, the app is installed for the user. Then, once it is installed this way, the app appears in the user’s Open with options as well as the Create > more contextual menu for files of registered MIME types.

Apps still need to specify primary and secondary MIME types when they enable the Drive SDK in the APIs console. But, unlike before, there is no need to install via the Chrome Web Store in order to get UI integration -- web store integration is entirely optional (though recommended).

Essentially, Drive now offers three levels of integration, which apps can combine according to their needs:

  • Simple API access with the Drive API enabled.
  • UI integration, with API access, the Drive SDK enabled, and OAuth-based installation.
  • CWS-based integration, with all of the above plus web store installation and marketing/upsell features.

For guidance in getting started integrating your app in any of these ways, see “Build a Drive Web App” or "Integrate with the Drive UI" in the SDK documentation.

We still recommend that developers consider the many benefits of creating a Chrome Web Store listing for their application. In addition to providing ease of installation for users “shopping” in the Drive app collection, a web store listing provides helpful features to market and promote an app. Our usage analysis shows that apps in the Chrome Web Store receive more usage than apps that aren’t listed. But now, with the installation scope, you can get started developing and testing your app more quickly and then list it in the Chrome Web Store when you’re ready.

If you have any questions about the installation scope, don’t hesitate to let us know on our Stack Overflow tag, google-drive-sdk.

Eric Gilmore

Eric is a technical writer working with the Developer Relations group. Previously dedicated to Google Apps APIs, he is now busy writing about all aspects of the Google Drive SDK.

URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2012/09/announcing-google-drive-installation.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

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Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update for Chrome OS

The Dev channel has been updated to 23.0.1262.2 (Platform version: 2876.0.0) for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5 550, Samsung Series 3, and Cr-48) and Samsung Chromebox Series 3. This build contains a number of UI, functional and stability improvements. 

Highlights of these changes are:

  • Updated Pepper Flash to version 11.3.31.329
  • Application launcher improvements
  • Photo import improvements
  • Desktop support improvements
  • Notification improvements

Known Issues:


  • 34334 - External display gets cropped after resume from sleep
  • 145312 - Black screen on boot sometimes when using external monitor. Workaround: Restart system
  • 148432 - Maximizing an app window results in a blank screen. Workaround: Press Alt+tab or switch window key
  • 148578 - Instant search not working
  • 147635 - Crash when closing maximized window via Ctrl+W
  • 147666 - File Manager downloads "open" button missing. Workaround: Right click to open
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.

Ben Henry & Josafat Garcia
    Google Chrome
    URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/09/dev-channel-update-for-chrome-os_12.html

    [Gd] Beta Channel Update

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    Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

    The Beta channel has been updated to 22.0.1229.52 for Windows, Mac, and Linux.  A complete log of what changed can be found in the svn revision log.  Instructions and download links for our different release channels are available on the Chromium wiki.  If you find what you think is a new bug, please file it in our issue tracker.

    Jason Kersey
    Google Chrome
    URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/09/beta-channel-update_11.html

    Tuesday, September 11, 2012

    [Gd] Six strategies for building a great Chrome extension

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    Google Developers Blog: Six strategies for building a great Chrome extension

    Author Photo
    This guest post was written by , CTO of Ecquire

    Even though the words "browser extension" connote a one-trick feature, today’s browser extensions allow developers to accomplish some pretty amazing things. Entire companies are being funded and sold as extensions and providing serious value to users.

    Here’s how you can make your browser extension a formidable product.

    1. Use Your Superpowers

    Developing an extension gives you advantages you may not have been aware of. Think of your extension as an abnormally powerful front end. I'll name a few features we've especially enjoyed:
    • Let your users install very slickly directly from your home website to increase conversions.
    • List on the Chrome Web Store for tens of thousands of free impressions. (Tip: For maximum exposure and traffic, invest time in beautiful graphic assets.)
    • Use localStorage as a super-easy store. Unlike in regular web applications, localStorage for extensions remains untouched even if users clear their cookies. (For more structured, asynchronous, client-side storage of large amounts of objects, take a look at IndexedDB.)
    • Let Chrome sync your extension across devices, including data you store in chrome.storage.sync.
    Extensions are your chance to hack with any site you've wanted to improve beyond the limits of their API. There are many more very powerful advantages browser extensions have - these are just the lesser known ones.

    Check out examples and look at what other apps (even silly ones) have done. If you find yourself asking “how did they do that?”, check out the source code.

    2. Know What's Going On Inside Your App

    Because extensions are front ends on steroids, you have your pick of almost any web analytics software you choose. We recommend choosing an event-based, not a page view-based model because the definition of a page view is hard to interpret in most extensions. Instead, track specific interactions.

    We chose Mixpanel, but there's an official Chrome tutorial on using Google Analytics in an extension. The principles of implementation are the same no matter what you choose.

    Solid analytics help you answer questions about what's going on inside your app using hard data instead of intuition and opinions. It will also undoubtedly reveal a few unexpected surprises about user behavior.

    3. Connect to Third-Party APIs

    Good apps avoid reinventing the wheel, and great apps connect users to the services they already like using. Extensions can request permission to connect with any domain. Just because you're an extension doesn't mean you can't use OAuth to authorize those requests.

    If your extension has a server backend, then fantastic, you have plenty of resources to help you. If you want to directly make requests from the user's computer, that is completely possible. The initial handshake and exchange of access token is done from a light server, but after that you can save the tokens locally. This allows your extension to run all of its interactions client-side if you'd like to keep things simple.

    4. Make Money

    Accepting credit cards and making financial transactions via an extension can be just as ironclad and secure as anywhere else. There's no shortage of billing management services that provide hosted payment pages and APIs.

    Simply direct users to secure hosted payment pages to accept credit card information, letting the billing service deal with compliance. We use Recurly, which conveniently allows our users to use coupon codes, receive invoices by email, and manage their billing info directly, saving us even more development time and headache.

    Hosted payment pages may be simple to implement, but they are pretty powerful (see also Chargify and CheddarGetter). They allow very specific management of your paying customers. Hosted payment pages can make your extension aware of the user's subscription status, to deactivate or activate as appropriate. Your customers’ payment statuses can be accessed with APIs behind the scenes throughout the lifetime of your extensions.

    If you prefer a super-streamlined flow for your customers - one where they potentially do not need to enter their credit card information - using a hosted payment page from Paypal or the recently announced Google Wallet for digital goods are your best bets for maximum coverage and quickest checkout.

    Using hosted payment systems affords maximum functionality with the least amount of coding and testing - or any server-side billing logic. Most importantly, you have peace of mind that your customer's financial information is secure and compliant. No compromises.

    5. Use Frontend Frameworks

    Anywhere there's JavaScript, you can use JQuery, BackboneJS and CoffeeScript: any JS library or plugin you love. This applies across the extension architecture, from injected UI in content scripts to any background code. The entire platform is web frontend - you can run anything you would use in a web application.

    6. Test All the Freaking Time

    Okay, I admit it's a more fun motto to say than to do, but if you're a TATFTer, I have good news for you. Adrian Unger provides a how-to on using Jasmine BDD in browser extensions even in the sub-cockles of your content scripts, even in the context of a live, logged-in webpage.

    Peace of mind about your code is important, but it's even more crucial in extensions where you don't control the webpages you may be injecting into. You can use Jasmine to assert that the DOM of your target web sites hasn't changed too much and that your code is still valid out in the wild web.

    In summary, just when you thought you knew everything you could do on the web, new doors open up. This is just a small taste of our lessons learned about what puts browser extensions in the league of extraordinary platforms. Like any new platform, I can’t even imagine the innovation that has yet to launch.


    is the CTO of Ecquire, a maker of CRM workflow automation software. Capture contacts from anywhere and Ecquire puts it in the right account for you. Read Tal’s guides on Chrome development and startup experiences on the Ecquire blog.

    Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
    URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2012/09/six-strategies-for-building-great.html

    [Gd] Dev Channel Update

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    Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update

    The Dev channel has been updated to 23.0.1262.0 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and ChromeFrame platforms

    All

    • Updated V8 - 3.13.6.0
    • Updated WebKit - 537.10
    All
    Mac
    • Make the favicons for chrome:// URLs high DPI (Issue: 145228)
    Linux
    • Make the new sandbox more robust when denying socket calls.

    More details about additional changes are available in the svn log of all revisions.

    You can find out about getting on the Dev channel here: http://dev.chromium.org/getting-involved/dev-channel.

    If you find new issues, please let us know by filing a bug at http://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/entry


    Karen Grunberg
    Google Chrome
    URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/09/dev-channel-update_10.html