Saturday, April 28, 2012

[Gd] Fuzzing for Security

| More

Chromium Blog: Fuzzing for Security

Web browsers are big, complicated pieces of software that are extremely difficult to secure. In the case of Chrome, it’s an even more interesting challenge as we contend with a codebase that evolves at a blisteringly fast pace. All of this means that we need to move very quickly to keep up, and one of the ways we do so is with a scaled out fuzzing infrastructure.

Chrome’s fuzzing infrastructure (affectionately named "ClusterFuzz") is built on top of a cluster of several hundred virtual machines running approximately six-thousand simultaneous Chrome instances. ClusterFuzz automatically grabs the most current Chrome LKGR (Last Known Good Revision), and hammers away at it to the tune of around fifty-million test cases a day. That capacity has roughly quadrupled since the system’s inception, and we plan to quadruple it again over the next few weeks.

With that kind of volume, we’d be overloaded if we just automated the test case generation and crash detection. That’s why we’ve automated the entire fuzzing pipeline, including the following processes:

  • Managing test cases and infrastructure - To run at maximum capacity we need to generate a constant stream of test cases, distribute them across thousands of Chrome instances running on hundreds of virtual machines, and track the results.
  • Analyzing crashes - The only crashes we care about for security purposes are the exploitable ones. So we use Address Sanitizer to instrument our Chrome binaries and provide detailed reports on potentially exploitable crashes.
  • Minimizing test cases - Fuzzer test cases are often very large files—usually as much as several hundred kilobytes each. So we take the generated test cases and distill them down to the few, essential pieces that actually trigger the crash.
  • Identifying regressions - The first step in getting a crash fixed is figuring out where it is and who should fix it. So this phase tracks the crash down to the range of changes that introduced it.
  • Verifying fixes - In order to verify when a crash is actually fixed, which we run the open crash cases against each new LKGR build.

In addition to manageability, this level of scale and automation provides a very important additional benefit. By aggressively tracking the Chrome LKGR builds, ClusterFuzz is evolving into a real-time security regression detection capability. To appreciate just what that means, consider that ClusterFuzz has detected 95 unique vulnerabilities since we brought it fully online at the end of last year. In that time, 44 of those vulnerabilities were identified and fixed before they ever had a chance to make it out to a stable release. As we further refine our process and increase our scale, we expect potential security regressions in stable releases to become increasingly less common.

Just like Chrome itself, our fuzzing work is constantly evolving and pushing the state of the art in both scale and techniques. In keeping with Chrome’s security principles, we’re helping to make the web safer by upstreaming the security fixes into projects we rely upon, like WebKit and FFmpeg. As we expand and improve ClusterFuzz, users of those upstream projects will continue to benefit.

Posted by Abhishek Arya and Cris Neckar, Chrome Security Team
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2012/04/fuzzing-for-security.html

Friday, April 27, 2012

[Gd] Even more Top Search Queries data

| More

Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Even more Top Search Queries data

Webmaster level: All

We recently updated the Top Search Queries data to take into account the average top position, we enabled programmatic download and we made sure you could still get all the queries that drive traffic to your site. Well, now it’s time to give you more search queries data!

First, and most important, you can 
now see up to 90 days of historical data. If you click on the date picker in the top right of Search queries, you can go back three months instead of the previous 35 days.


And after you click:


In order to see 90 days, the option to view with changes will be disabled. If you want to see the changes with respect to the previous time period, the limit remains 30 days. Changes are disabled by default but you can switch them on and off with the button between the graph and the table. Top search queries data is normally available within 2 or 3 days.


Another big improvement in Webmaster Tools is that you can now see basic search query data as soon as you verify ownership of a site. No more waiting to see your information.

Finally, now we are collecting data for the top 2000 queries for which your site gets clicks. You may see less than 2000 if we didn’t record any click for a particular query in a given day, or if your query data is spread out among many countries or languages. For example, a search query for “flowers” in Google Canada is counted separately from a query for “flowers” in Google US. Nevertheless, with this change 98% of sites will have complete coverage. Let us know what you think. We hope the new data will be useful.

Written by Javier Tordable, Tech Lead, Webmaster Tools
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2012/04/even-more-top-search-queries-data.html

Thursday, April 26, 2012

[Gd] The Beta channel has been updated to 19.0.1084.36 for Windows,

| More

Chrome Releases: The Beta channel has been updated to 19.0.1084.36 for Windows,

The Beta channel has been updated to 19.0.1084.36 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame. 

Take a look at the changelog to see what happened in this release.

If you'd like to get on the Beta channel, you can download it from our Beta download page. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Anthony Laforge
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/04/beta-channel-has-been-updated-to-19.html

[Gd] African developers finding success with Google technologies

| More

Google Developers Blog: African developers finding success with Google technologies

Author PhotoBy Chukwuemeka Afigbo, Program Manager, Sub-Saharan Africa

Cross-posted from the Google Africa Blog

Creating applications and services that use Google platforms to make the internet more relevant to Africans is a big part of Google’s vision in Africa. This is why we are always excited whenever we come across individuals or companies whose efforts are in line with this vision. Here are a few of the interesting applications we have seen in recent months.

Battabox, co founded by Christian Purefoy and Yemisi Ilo, is an online social television platform developed in Nigeria that aims to provide everything Nigerian from music, film, street-life to news, comedy and cooking using the YouTube platform. Crowdsourcing videos is an important part of the Battabox strategy and they were able to achieve this using YouTube Direct running on Google App Engine integrated into their website. They also provided an Android App that enables users to upload videos directly from their Android phones.




Battabox website screenshot

There are many other examples from further afield. In South Africa we met Nomanini who have a Google App Engine backend for Lula, their airtime vending device, which promises to change the way airtime is distributed in the region. Envaya SMS is an amazing application that turns your Android phone into an SMS gateway and has been used by many NGOs in East Africa. SAF SMS is a school management solution built with Google Web Toolkit that has been adopted in more than 100 schools in Nigeria. We also met Serengeti Advisers, a consultancy firm in Tanzania that uses Google Chart Tools to create interactive reports on their website.



Nomanini’s Lula terminal communicates with a backend powered by Google App Engine

As part of our drive to meet and interact with app developers in Africa, our Android Developer Relations team also recently hosted the developers of AfriNolly and the Nigerian Constitution Android app on their weekly Android DevRel office hours hangout on Google+ for Europe, Middle East and Africa. At the hangout, these African developers shared information about their apps with other Android developers.

You can follow the exploits of these and more developers in Sub Saharan Africa as they continue to make things happen with Google APIs and platforms by keeping an eye on our case studies page.

Do you feel your app should be featured here? Let us know!


Chukwuemeka Afigbo is a Program Manager in the Sub-Saharan Africa Outreach Team. He is an avid football (soccer) fan.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2012/04/african-developers-finding-success-with.html

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

[Gd] 1000 Words About Images

| More

Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: 1000 Words About Images

Webmaster level: All

Creativity is an important aspect of our lives and can enrich nearly everything we do. Say I'd like to make my teammate a cup of cool-looking coffee, but my creative batteries are empty; this would be (and is!) one of the many times when I look for inspiration on Google Images.


The images you see in our search results come from publishers of all sizes — bloggers, media outlets, stock photo sites — who have embedded these images in their HTML pages. Google can index image types formatted as BMP, GIF, JPEG, PNG and WebP, as well as SVG.

But how does Google know that the images are about coffee and not about tea? When our algorithms index images, they look at the textual content on the page the image was found on to learn more about the image. We also look at the page's title and its body; we might also learn more from the image’s filename, anchor text that points to it, and its "alt text;" we may use computer vision to learn more about the image and may also use the caption provided in the Image Sitemap if that text also exists on the page.

 To help us index your images, make sure that:
  • we can crawl both the HTML page the image is embedded in, and the image itself;
  • the image is in one of our supported formats: BMP, GIF, JPEG, PNG, WebP or SVG.
Additionally, we recommend:
  • that the image filename is related to the image’s content;
  • that the alt attribute of the image describes the image in a human-friendly way;
  • and finally, it also helps if the HTML page’s textual contents as well as the text near the image are related to the image.
Now some answers to questions we’ve seen many times:


Q: Why do I sometimes see Googlebot crawling my images, rather than Googlebot-Image?
A: Generally this happens when it’s not clear that a URL will lead to an image, so we crawl the URL with Googlebot first. If we find the URL leads to an image, we’ll usually revisit with Googlebot-Image. Because of this, it’s generally a good idea to allow crawling of your images and pages by both Googlebot and Googlebot-Image.

Q: Is it true that there’s a maximum file size for the images?
A: We’re happy to index images of any size; there’s no file size restriction.

Q: What happens to the EXIF, XMP and other metadata my images contain?
A: We may use any information we find to help our users find what they’re looking for more easily. Additionally, information like EXIF data may be displayed in the right-hand sidebar of the interstitial page that appears when you click on an image.


Q: Should I really submit an Image Sitemap? What are the benefits?
A: Yes! Image Sitemaps help us learn about your new images and may also help us learn what the images are about.


Q: I’m using a CDN to host my images; how can I still use an Image Sitemap?
A: Cross-domain restrictions apply only to the Sitemaps’ tag. In Image Sitemaps, the tag is allowed to point to a URL on another domain, so using a CDN for your images is fine. We also encourage you to verify the CDN’s domain name in Webmaster Tools so that we can inform you of any crawl errors that we might find.


Q: Is it a problem if my images can be found on multiple domains or subdomains I own — for example, CDNs or related sites?
A: Generally, the best practice is to have only one copy of any type of content. If you’re duplicating your images across multiple hostnames, our algorithms may pick one copy as the canonical copy of the image, which may not be your preferred version. This can also lead to slower crawling and indexing of your images.


Q: We sometimes see the original source of an image ranked lower than other sources; why is this?
A: Keep in mind that we use the textual content of a page when determining the context of an image. For example, if the original source is a page from an image gallery that has very little text, it can happen that a page with more textual context is chosen to be shown in search. If you feel you've identified very bad search results for a particular query, feel free to use the feedback link below the search results or to share your example in our Webmaster Help Forum.

SafeSearch

Our algorithms use a great variety of signals to decide whether an image — or a whole page, if we’re talking about Web Search — should be filtered from the results when the user’s SafeSearch filter is turned on. In the case of images some of these signals are generated using computer vision, but the SafeSearch algorithms also look at simpler things such as where the image was used previously and the context in which the image was used. 
One of the strongest signals, however, is self-marked adult pages. We recommend that webmasters who publish adult content mark up their pages with one of the following meta tags:

<meta name="rating" content="adult" />
<meta name="rating" content="RTA-5042-1996-1400-1577-RTA" />

Many users prefer not to have adult content included in their search results (especially if kids use the same computer). When a webmaster provides one of these meta tags, it helps to provide a better user experience because users don't see results which they don't want to or expect to see. 

As with all algorithms, sometimes it may happen that SafeSearch filters content inadvertently. If you think your images or pages are mistakenly being filtered by SafeSearch, please let us know using the following form

If you need more information about how we index images, please check out the section of our Help Center dedicated to images, read our SEO Starter Guide which contains lots of useful information, and if you have more questions please post them in the Webmaster Help Forum

Written by Gary Illyes, Webmaster Trends Analyst
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2012/04/1000-words-about-images.html

[Gd] How to move your content to a new location

| More

Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: How to move your content to a new location

Webmaster level: Intermediate

While maintaining a website, webmasters may decide to move the whole website or parts of it to a new location. For example, you might move content from a subdirectory to a subdomain, or to a completely new domain. Changing the location of your content can involve a bit of effort, but it’s worth doing it properly.

To help search engines understand your new site structure better and make your site more user-friendly, make sure to follow these guidelines:
  • It’s important to redirect all users and bots that visit your old content location to the new content location using 301 redirects. To highlight the relationship between the two locations, make sure that each old URL points to the new URL that hosts similar content. If you’re unable to use 301 redirects, you may want to consider using cross domain canonicals for search engines instead.
  • Check that you have both the new and the old location verified in the same Google Webmaster Tools account.
  • Make sure to check if the new location is crawlable by Googlebot using the Fetch as Googlebot feature. It’s important to make sure Google can actually access your content in the new location. Also make sure that the old URLs are not blocked by a robots.txt disallow directive, so that the redirect or rel=canonical can be found.
  • If you’re moving your content to an entirely new domain, use the Change of address option under Site configuration in Google Webmaster Tools to let us know about the change.
Change of address option in Google Webmaster Tools
Tell us about moving your content via Google Webmaster Tools
  • If you've also changed your site's URL structure, make sure that it's possible to navigate it without running into 404 error pages. Google Webmaster Tools may prove useful in investigating potentially broken links. Just look for Diagnostics > Crawl errors for your new site.
  • Check your Sitemap and verify that it’s up to date.
  • Once you've set up your 301 redirects, you can keep an eye on users to your 404 error pages to check that users are being redirected to new pages, and not accidentally ending up on broken URLs. When a user comes to a 404 error page on your site, try to identify which URL they were trying to access, why this user was not redirected to the new location of your content, and then make changes to your 301 redirect rules as appropriate.
  • Have a look at the Links to your site in Google Webmaster Tools and inform the important sites that link to your content about your new location.
  • If your site’s content is specific to a particular region you may want to double check the geotargeting preferences for your new site structure in Google Webmaster Tools.
  • As a general rule of thumb, try to avoid running two crawlable sites with completely or largely identical content without a 301 redirection or specifying a rel=”canonical”
  • Lastly, we recommend not implementing other major changes when you’re moving your content to a new location, like large-scale content, URL structure, or navigational updates. Changing too much at once may confuse users and search engines.
We hope you find these suggestions useful. If you happen to have further questions on how to move your content to a new location we’d like to encourage you to drop by our Google Webmaster Help Forum and seek advice from expert webmasters.

Written by Fili Wiese (Ad Traffic Quality) & Kaspar Szymanski (Search Quality)
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2012/04/how-to-move-your-content-to-new.html

[Gd] Introducing Google Drive and the Google Drive SDK

| More

Google Apps Developer Blog: Introducing Google Drive and the Google Drive SDK

Editor's note: This post is cross-posted from the Google Developers Blog.


Today, we're announcing Google Drive—a place where people can create, share, collaborate and keep all of their stuff. Drive is a natural step in the evolution of Google Docs. Drive is built to work seamlessly with other Google applications like Google+, Docs and Gmail, and your app can too. Joining the launch today are 18 web apps that have integrated with Drive using the Google Drive SDK.


Integrating your application with Google Drive makes it available to millions of users. Drive apps are distributed from the Chrome Web Store, and can be used with any modern browser. Plus, your app can take advantage of Google's sharing, storage, and identity management features.



Create and collaborate

Google Drive allows for more than storage. Google Docs is built right into Drive, and your app can join the party. For example, Lucidchart is an online visual diagramming tool integrated with Google Drive. You can start a new Lucidchart or share your diagrams with friends or coworkers straight from Drive, just like a Google document or spreadsheet.

Store everything safely and access it everywhere

With Google Drive you can store all of your files and access them from anywhere. For example, MindMeister, an app for creating mind maps online, also lets you open files from popular desktop mind mapping applications. By integrating with Google Drive, MindMeister users can open their mind maps stored in Drive from any modern browser.

Search everything

Your app can also take advantage of Drive's storage, indexing, and document viewers. For example, HelloFax is a web application that lets you sign and fax documents from your browser. HelloFax users can now store all their inbound and outbound faxes in Google Drive, making them easy to find later. Plus, with automatic OCR, users can even search and find text in faxed images. Your application can store files of any type up to 10 GB in size or create file-like shortcuts to your application's data.

Want your application to work with Google Drive? Full documentation on the Google Drive SDK is available at developers.google.com/drive, or if you're itching to start building, head to our Getting Started guide. Our team will be on Stack Overflow to answer any questions you have when integrating your app with Google Drive. You can also bring your questions to our Hangout this Thursday at 10:30 AM PDT / 17:30 UTC.

Look for more posts about working with the Drive SDK on the Google Apps Developer Blog in the coming weeks.

Mike Procopio profile

Mike is a Software Engineer for Google Drive, focusing on all things Drive apps. He gets to leverage his passion for the developer and user experience by working on the next-generation APIs that help unleash Google Drive. Before joining Google in 2010, he was a machine learning researcher, and enjoys engaging in illuminating statistical discussions at every opportunity.

URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2012/04/introducing-google-drive-and-google.html

[Gd] App Engine 1.6.5 Released

| More

Google App Engine Blog: App Engine 1.6.5 Released

April showers -- and a bit more than showers -- have kept us happily inside working away on our fourth release of this year (we are really looking forward to those flowers). Today’s release includes some updates to the Datastore and the runtimes, new features for the Images API, and more!

Datastore

We’ve introduced an experimental type of query, projection queries, in the Datastore. For the SQL fans amongst us, this is similar to queries of the form:





SELECT Property1, Property2 FROM MyEntity ORDER BY Property3


Projection queries have the same cost and performance characteristics as keys-only queries but return entity objects populated only with the requested properties.

We are also adding several other Datastore features in this release:



  • Each entity group now has a numeric version property that strictly increases on every entity group change. You can use this counter, for example, to easily and consistently cache the results of an ancestor query, such as the count of all entities in an entity group (Java®, Python examples).

  • The Datastore Admin now allows you to restore individual Kinds from an existing backup, abort in-progress backups, and view more detailed backup and restore information.

  • For Python users, the @db.transactional decorator now supports concurrent transactions. We’ve also expanded the options available for the db.run_in_transtion_options() function.

Images API

  • The Images API can now access image objects stored in Google Cloud Storage.

  • The URLs generated by get_serving_url()/getServingUrl() that make use of our high-speed image serving infrastructure can now be generated to serve over HTTPS.

Task Queue

We are looking for Trusted Testers for Task Queue Statistics. Task Queue Statistics allows you to fetch statistics and information about your task queue from within your application. Apply now to be a Trusted Tester.

Request Headers

In this release, we are including additional request headers to provide more detailed information about the origin of a request. We’ve added Region, City and LatLng headers to each request where this information can be inferred from the IP address.

Java

Finally, an important piece of news for our Java developers: the <threadsafe> element is now required in appengine-web.xml file; omitting it will cause an error in the dev appserver.

As always, send us feedback in our Google Group, send us technical questions on Stack Overflow, and read the complete release notes for all the new features and fixes in this release for Java, Python, and Go.



Posted by the App Engine Team





Java is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates.
URL: http://googleappengine.blogspot.com/2012/04/app-engine-165-released.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Update

| More

Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update

The Dev channel has been updated to 20.0.1115.1 for Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome Frame.  The build contains few fixes and update to V8 (3.10.5.0). Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Dharani Govindan
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/04/dev-channel-update_24.html

[Gd] Webmaster Tools spring cleaning

| More

Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Webmaster Tools spring cleaning

Webmaster level: All

Webmaster Tools added lots of new functionality over the past year, such as improvements to Sitemaps and Crawl errors, as well as the new User Administration feature. In recent weeks, we also updated the look & feel of our user interface to match Google's new style. In order to keep bringing you improvements, we occasionally review each of our features to see if they’re still useful in comparison to the maintenance and support they require. As a result of our latest round of spring cleaning, we'll be removing the Subscriber stats feature, the Create robots.txt tool, and the Site performance feature in the next two weeks.

Subscriber stats reports the number of subscribers to a site’s RSS or Atom feeds. This functionality is currently provided in Feedburner, another Google product which offers its own subscriber stats as well as other cool features specifically geared for feeds of all types. If you are looking for a replacement to Subscriber stats in Webmaster Tools, check out Feedburner.

The Create robots.txt tool provides a way to generate robots.txt files for the purpose of blocking specific parts of a site from being crawled by Googlebot. This feature has very low usage, so we've decided to remove it from Webmaster Tools. While many websites don't even need a robots.txt file, if you feel that you do need one, it's easy to make one yourself in a text editor or use one of the many other tools available on the web for generating robots.txt files.

Site performance is a Webmaster Tools Labs feature that provides information about the average load time of your site's pages. This feature is also being removed due to low usage. Now you might have heard our announcement from a couple of years ago that the latency of a site's pages is a factor in our search ranking algorithms. This is still true, and you can analyze your site's performance using the Site Speed feature in Google Analytics or using Google's PageSpeed online. There are also many other site performance analysis tools available like WebPageTest and the YSlow browser plugin.

If you have questions or comments about these changes please post them in our Help Forum.

Written by Jonathan Simon, Webmaster Trends Analyst
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2012/04/webmaster-tools-spring-cleaning.html

[Gd] Webmaster Tools spring cleaning

| More

Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Webmaster Tools spring cleaning

Webmaster level: All

Webmaster Tools added lots of new functionality over the past year, such as improvements to Sitemaps and Crawl errors, as well as the new User Administration feature. In recent weeks, we also updated the look & feel of our user interface to match Google's new style. In order to keep bringing you improvements, we occasionally review each of our features to see if they’re still useful in comparison to the maintenance and support they require. As a result of our latest round of spring cleaning, we'll be removing the Subscriber stats feature, the Create robots.txt tool, and the Site performance feature in the next two weeks.

Subscriber stats reports the number of subscribers to a site’s RSS or Atom feeds. This functionality is currently provided in Feedburner, another Google product which offers its own subscriber stats as well as other cool features specifically geared for feeds of all types. If you are looking for a replacement to Subscriber stats in Webmaster Tools, check out Feedburner.

The Create robots.txt tool provides a way to generate robots.txt files for the purpose of blocking specific parts of a site from being crawled by Googlebot. This feature has very low usage, so we've decided to remove it from Webmaster Tools. While many websites don't even need a robots.txt file, if you feel that you do need one, it's easy to make one yourself in a text editor or use one of the many other tools available on the web for generating robots.txt files.

Site performance is a Webmaster Tools Labs feature that provides information about the average load time of your site's pages. This feature is also being removed due to low usage. Now you might have heard our announcement from a couple of years ago that the latency of a site's pages is a factor in our search ranking algorithms. This is still true, and you can analyze your site's performance using the Site Speed feature in Google Analytics or using Google's PageSpeed online. There are also many other site performance analysis tools available like WebPageTest and the YSlow browser plugin.

If you have questions or comments about these changes please post them in our Help Forum.

Written by Jonathan Simon, Webmaster Trends Analyst
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2012/04/webmaster-tools-spring-cleaning.html

[Gd] Another step to reward high-quality sites

| More

Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Another step to reward high-quality sites

Webmaster level: All

Google has said before that search engine optimization, or SEO, can be positive and constructive—and we're not the only ones. Effective search engine optimization can make a site more crawlable and make individual pages more accessible and easier to find. Search engine optimization includes things as simple as keyword research to ensure that the right words are on the page, not just industry jargon that normal people will never type.

“White hat” search engine optimizers often improve the usability of a site, help create great content, or make sites faster, which is good for both users and search engines. Good search engine optimization can also mean good marketing: thinking about creative ways to make a site more compelling, which can help with search engines as well as social media. The net result of making a great site is often greater awareness of that site on the web, which can translate into more people linking to or visiting a site.

The opposite of “white hat” SEO is something called “black hat webspam” (we say “webspam” to distinguish it from email spam). In the pursuit of higher rankings or traffic, a few sites use techniques that don’t benefit users, where the intent is to look for shortcuts or loopholes that would rank pages higher than they deserve to be to be ranked. We see all sorts of webspam techniques every day, from keyword stuffing to link schemes that attempt to propel sites higher in rankings.

The goal of many of our ranking changes is to help searchers find sites that provide a great user experience and fulfill their information needs. We also want the “good guys” making great sites for users, not just algorithms, to see their effort rewarded. To that end we’ve launched Panda changes that successfully returned higher-quality sites in search results. And earlier this year we launched a page layout algorithm that reduces rankings for sites that don’t make much content available “above the fold.”

In the next few days, we’re launching an important algorithm change targeted at webspam. The change will decrease rankings for sites that we believe are violating Google’s existing quality guidelines. We’ve always targeted webspam in our rankings, and this algorithm represents another improvement in our efforts to reduce webspam and promote high quality content. While we can't divulge specific signals because we don't want to give people a way to game our search results and worsen the experience for users, our advice for webmasters is to focus on creating high quality sites that create a good user experience and employ white hat SEO methods instead of engaging in aggressive webspam tactics.

Here’s an example of a webspam tactic like keyword stuffing taken from a site that will be affected by this change:


Of course, most sites affected by this change aren’t so blatant. Here’s an example of a site with unusual linking patterns that is also affected by this change. Notice that if you try to read the text aloud you’ll discover that the outgoing links are completely unrelated to the actual content, and in fact the page text has been “spun” beyond recognition:


Sites affected by this change might not be easily recognizable as spamming without deep analysis or expertise, but the common thread is that these sites are doing much more than white hat SEO; we believe they are engaging in webspam tactics to manipulate search engine rankings.

The change will go live for all languages at the same time. For context, the initial Panda change affected about 12% of queries to a significant degree; this algorithm affects about 3.1% of queries in English to a degree that a regular user might notice. The change affects roughly 3% of queries in languages such as German, Chinese, and Arabic, but the impact is higher in more heavily-spammed languages. For example, 5% of Polish queries change to a degree that a regular user might notice.

We want people doing white hat search engine optimization (or even no search engine optimization at all) to be free to focus on creating amazing, compelling web sites. As always, we’ll keep our ears open for feedback on ways to iterate and improve our ranking algorithms toward that goal.

Posted by Matt Cutts, Distinguished Engineer
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2012/04/another-step-to-reward-high-quality.html

[Gd] Introducing Google Drive and the Google Drive SDK

| More

Google Developers Blog: Introducing Google Drive and the Google Drive SDK

Author PhotoBy Mike Procopio, Software Engineer

Today, we're announcing Google Drive—a place where people can create, share, collaborate and keep all of their stuff. Drive is a natural step in the evolution of Google Docs. Drive is built to work seamlessly with other Google applications like Google+, Docs and Gmail, and your app can too. Joining the launch today are 18 web apps that have integrated with Drive using the Google Drive SDK.



Integrating your application with Google Drive makes it available to millions of users. Drive apps are distributed from the Chrome Web Store, and can be used with any modern browser. Plus, your app can take advantage of Google's sharing, storage, and identity management features.



Create and collaborate

Google Drive allows for more than storage. Google Docs is built right into Drive, and your app can join the party. For example, Lucidchart is an online visual diagramming tool integrated with Google Drive. You can start a new Lucidchart or share your diagrams with friends or coworkers straight from Drive, just like a Google document or spreadsheet.

Store everything safely and access it everywhere

With Google Drive you can store all of your files and access them from anywhere. For example, MindMeister, an app for creating mind maps online, also lets you open files from popular desktop mind mapping applications. By integrating with Google Drive, MindMeister users can open their mind maps stored in Drive from any modern browser.

Search everything

Your app can also take advantage of Drive's storage, indexing, and document viewers. For example, HelloFax is a web application that lets you sign and fax documents from your browser. HelloFax users can now store all their inbound and outbound faxes in Google Drive, making them easy to find later. Plus, with automatic OCR, users can even search and find text in faxed images. Your application can store files of any type up to 10 GB in size or create file-like shortcuts to your application's data.

Want your application to work with Google Drive? Full documentation on the Google Drive SDK is available at developers.google.com/drive, or if you're itching to start building, head to our Getting Started guide. Our team will be on Stack Overflow to answer any questions you have when integrating your app with Google Drive. You can also bring your questions to our Hangout this Thursday at 10:30 AM PDT / 17:30 UTC.

Look for more posts about working with the Drive SDK on the Google Apps Developer Blog in the coming weeks.


Mike Procopio is a Software Engineer for Google Drive, focusing on all things Drive apps. He gets to leverage his passion for the developer and user experience by working on the next-generation APIs that help unleash Google Drive. Before joining Google in 2010, he was a machine learning researcher, and enjoys engaging in illuminating statistical discussions at every opportunity.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googledevelopers.blogspot.com/2012/04/introducing-google-drive-and-google.html

Monday, April 23, 2012

[Gd] Stable and Beta Channel Update for Chromebooks

| More

Chrome Releases: Stable and Beta Channel Update for Chromebooks


The Stable and Beta channels have been updated to 18.0.1025.165 (Platform version: 1660.132.0) for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48). Beta channel has been updated to the same version for Cr-48 systems.

This release contains security and stability improvement.
Release highlights:

  • 26151: Audio stops playing occasionally

If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching to the Beta channel? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.
Danielle DrewGoogle Chrome


URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/04/stable-and-beta-channel-update-for.html

[Gd] Stable Channel Update

| More

Chrome Releases: Stable Channel Update


The Chrome Stable channel has been updated to 18.0.1025.165 on Mac.  


This release fixes a top crasher on the Mac. (Issue: 123589).


Interested in hopping on the stable channel?  Find out how.  If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Karen Grunberg
Google Chrome

URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/04/stable-channel-update_23.html