Saturday, February 18, 2012

[Gd] Beta Channel Update for Chromebooks

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update for Chromebooks


The Beta channel has been updated to 18.0.1025.32 (Platform versions: 1660.34.0) for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48).

This build contains a number of new features, as well as security & stability improvements. Some highlights of these changes are:
  • Updated Pepper Flash version
  • Improvement to wifi stability
  • Improved system hardening [Yama support, etc]
  • File browser improvements
  • Crash fixes
Known issues:
  • 25971 -  Occasionally when switching tabs, the screen will not redraw the content to the new tab. Occurs most frequently when one tab contains Flash content. Workaround: Closing all tabs or restarting the machine resolves the issue.
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.

Danielle Drew
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/02/beta-channel-update-for-chromebooks_17.html

Friday, February 17, 2012

[Gd] Fridaygram: Google Public DNS, lonely black hole, tiny chameleons

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The official Google Code blog: Fridaygram: Google Public DNS, lonely black hole, tiny chameleons

Author Photo
By Scott Knaster, Google Code Blog Editor

Google Public DNS is a fast, free DNS service that we introduced a little more than 2 years ago. As the Official Google Blog post aptly puts it, “DNS acts like the phone book of the Internet”, translating from human-readable URLs to all-numeric IP addresses. Google Public DNS started as an experimental service and has now become the most-used public DNS service in the world with over 70 billion requests per day, mostly from outside the U.S. Will the next step be support for users in more distant places? (Probably not there.)

Speaking of faraway places, astronomers using images from the Hubble space telescope have found black hole HLX-1, which appears to be all that’s left of a dwarf galaxy that once contained other stars. The theory is that this late galaxy was torn apart by a nearby spiral galaxy, leaving only HLX-1. The other stars became part of the larger galaxy.

While you’re musing on this supermassive black hole, consider some much tinier creatures: little chameleons, just about one inch long, recently discovered in Madagascar. Scientists think this miniaturization might be an evolutionary response to limited resources.


tiny tiny tiny tiny tiny chameleon
Tiny chameleon: he comes and goes, he comes and goes

Finally, we can’t help but jump on the Linsanity bandwagon. Of course, we’re doing it in a nerdy way by pointing you to this article (interesting even for non-sports fans) about why talent evaluation is so tricky.


On Fridays we take a break and do a Fridaygram post just for fun. Each Fridaygram item must pass only one test: it has to be interesting to us nerds. Special thanks to Wired Science for having many excellent posts this week.

Images: Glaw, F., et al., PLoS ONE

URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2012/02/fridaygram-google-public-dns-lonely.html

[Gd] Come Learn About Apps Script in Washington, DC

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Google Apps Developer Blog: Come Learn About Apps Script in Washington, DC

Editor's note: This has been cross-posted from the Google Code blog -- Jan Kleinert

Google Apps Script is a JavaScript cloud scripting language that provides easy ways to automate tasks across Google products and third party services. If you want to learn more about Google Apps Script, collaborate with other developers, and meet the Apps Script team, here’s your chance! We will be holding an Apps Script hackathon in Washington, DC on Wednesday, March 7 from 2pm - 8pm.

After we cover the basics of Apps Script, you can code along with us as we build a complete script, or you can bring your own ideas and get some help and guidance from the team. There will be food, power, and Apps Script experts available to help throughout the day. Just bring your laptop, ideas, enthusiasm, and basic knowledge of JavaScript. Check out out the details of the event and be sure to RSVP to let us know you’re coming.

Jan Kleinert profile | twitter

Jan is a Developer Programs Engineer based in NYC, focusing on helping developers get the most out of Google Apps Script. Prior to Apps Script, she worked on Commerce, helping merchants integrate with Google Checkout and on Chrome, helping developers build great web apps.

URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2012/02/come-learn-about-apps-script-in.html

[Gd] Tech preview of Chromium with Dart engine now available

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Chromium Blog: Tech preview of Chromium with Dart engine now available

Cross posted to the Google Code Blog

An attractive feature of Web programming is a rapid development cycle. Reloading the application after the source code has changed takes a fraction of a second. We want to offer you that same experience when using Dart, and today we’re making Mac and Linux binaries available that integrate the Dart VM into Chromium.

This technology preview allows you to run your Dart programs directly on the Dart VM in Chromium and avoid a separate compilation step. Over time, these programs will take advantage of the VM’s faster performance and lower startup latency.

Dart has been designed from the start to work with the entire modern web, and we’re simultaneously continuing to improve our fast Dart-to-JavaScript compiler. Both the Dart VM and modern JavaScript engines are first-class targets for Dart.

This release of Chromium with Dart VM integration is a technology preview, and should not be used for day-to-day browsing. After more testing and developer feedback, we plan to eventually include the Dart VM in Chrome.

Today’s release of the Chromium + Dart VM integration is another step forward for the open source "batteries included" Dart platform. Our goal is to help you build complex, high performance apps for the modern web, and we encourage you to try Dart and let us know what you think.

 Posted by Anton Muhin, Vijay Menon, and Pavel Podivilov, Software Engineers
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2012/02/tech-preview-of-chromium-with-dart.html

Thursday, February 16, 2012

[Gd] Stable Channel Update for Chromebooks

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Chrome Releases: Stable Channel Update for Chromebooks

The Google Chrome team is happy to announce the release of Chrome 17 on the Stable Channel for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48). You can read more about the Chrome version 17.0.963.54 (Platform version: 1412.186.0)

Release highlights:

  • Read about improvements to Chrome over on the Google Chome blog
  • Fixed CVE-2012-0056 kernel: proc: /proc/<pid>/mem mem_write insufficient permission checking
  • Verizon activation and top-up portal
  • Update Pepper Flash
  • New photo editor
  • File browser improvements
  • OpenVPN support
  • Stability & security fixes
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching to the Beta channel? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.

Orit Mazor
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/02/stable-channel-update-for-chromebooks.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update


The Beta channel has been updated to 18.0.1025.33 for (All|Windows|Mac|Linux|ChromeFrame) platforms

All
  • Updated V8 - 3.8.9.6
  • Fixed several crashes (Issues: 110943, 110234, 110176, 108986)
  • Sync: Conflicting sync entries should not be committed (Issue: 82236)
  • Back button frequently hangs (Issue: 93427)
  • Fixed Speech input bubble borders don't closing (Issues: 98323, 112194
  • Improved the quality of the omnibox
Mac
  • Fixed Gap between download shelf and vertical scrollbar  (Issue: 111266)
More details about additional changes are available in the svn log of all revisions. If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Karen Grunberg
Google Chrome

    URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/02/beta-channel-update.html

    [Gd] Come learn about Apps Script in Washington, DC

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    The official Google Code blog: Come learn about Apps Script in Washington, DC

    Author Photo
    By Jan Kleinert, Developer Relations Team

    Google Apps Script is a JavaScript cloud scripting language that provides easy ways to automate tasks across Google products and third party services. If you want to learn more about Google Apps Script, collaborate with other developers, and meet the Apps Script team, here’s your chance! We will be holding an Apps Script hackathon in Washington, DC on Wednesday, March 7 from 2pm - 8pm.

    After we cover the basics of Apps Script, you can code along with us as we build a complete script, or you can bring your own ideas and get some help and guidance from the team. There will be food, power, and Apps Script experts available to help throughout the day. Just bring your laptop, ideas, enthusiasm, and basic knowledge of JavaScript. Check out out the details of the event and be sure to RSVP to let us know you’re coming.


    Jan Kleinert is a Developer Programs Engineer based in NYC, focusing on helping developers get the most out of Google Apps Script. Prior to Apps Script, she worked on Commerce, helping merchants integrate with Google Checkout and on Chrome, helping developers build great web apps.

    Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
    URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2012/02/come-learn-about-apps-script-in.html

    [Gd] Tech preview of Chromium with Dart engine now available

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    The official Google Code blog: Tech preview of Chromium with Dart engine now available

    author photo
    Pavel
    author photo
    Vijay
    author photo
    Anton

    By Anton Muhin, Vijay Menon, and Pavel Podivilov, Software Engineers

    Cross-posted with the Chromium Blog

    An attractive feature of Web programming is a rapid development cycle. Reloading the application after the source code has changed takes a fraction of a second. We want to offer you that same experience when using Dart, and today we’re making Mac and Linux binaries available that integrate the Dart VM into Chromium.

    This technology preview allows you to run your Dart programs directly on the Dart VM in Chromium and avoid a separate compilation step. Over time, these programs will take advantage of the VM’s faster performance and lower startup latency.

    Dart has been designed from the start to work with the entire modern web, and we’re simultaneously continuing to improve our fast Dart-to-JavaScript compiler. Both the Dart VM and modern JavaScript engines are first-class targets for Dart.

    This release of Chromium with Dart VM integration is a technology preview, and should not be used for day-to-day browsing. After more testing and developer feedback, we plan to eventually include the Dart VM in Chrome.

    Today’s release of the Chromium + Dart VM integration is another step forward for the open source "batteries included" Dart platform. Our goal is to help you build complex, high performance apps for the modern web, and we encourage you to try Dart and let us know what you think.


    Anton Muhin is an engineer at Google Saint Petersburg who recently worked on making V8 VM and DOM bindings faster and now is working on integrating the Dart VM into Chromium. Before that he worked on the Google Calendar backend.

    Vijay Menon is a software engineer at Google Seattle working on integrating the Dart language and runtime into the browser. His background is in compilers, runtime systems, and parallel programming.

    Pavel Podivilov is a software engineer at Google Saint Petersburg who worked on Chrome Developer Tools prior to joining the Dartium team.


    Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
    URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2012/02/tech-preview-of-chromium-with-dart.html

    [Gd] Video Uploads from Your Site’s Community

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    YouTube API Blog: Video Uploads from Your Site’s Community

    The following scenario comes up all the time when we talk to developers: a website with an active readership is interested in soliciting videos from its community. While YouTube is a great place to host these videos, it takes some forethought to design a system that makes uploading as straightforward as possible while still adhering to YouTube API Terms of Service and best practices.

    One crucial consideration is which account the videos will be uploaded to on YouTube. It’s tempting to design a system in which all videos are uploaded to a single “master” YouTube account, but this is always the wrong approach. While using a master account means that each uploader doesn’t need to register for their own YouTube account, a high rate of uploads into a single YouTube account is a good way to run afoul of the YouTube API’s quota system. Additionally, each uploader to YouTube agrees to YouTube’s Terms of Service, which says that they have the right to upload that content, and that the content does not violate our Community Guidelines. By taking responsibility for other users’ content, you are essentially putting your own account and YouTube standing at risk.

    The approach we recommend instead is using AuthSub or OAuth 2 (please don’t use ClientLogin!) to authenticate users and allow users to access their YouTube accounts. Then, you can use the browser-based upload flow to transmit the video from users’ local drives to YouTube’s servers. Uploads spread across end users’ accounts are less likely to trigger quota errors. And since videos end up in individual accounts, each account owner takes responsibility for ensuring that their uploads comply with YouTube’s community guidelines. Videos uploaded via your site will show up in a user’s channel just like any of their other videos.

    After a video’s been uploaded, you will almost certainly want to display it on your own site or on a YouTube channel page, which raises the question of how to keep track of videos that have been uploaded through your site but which end up in users’ own accounts. One option for doing this programmatically is via the use of developer tags; another approach is to make use of a local database and keep track of the YouTube video id returned by the API following each upload. Once you’ve identified uploaded videos that you’d like to feature, you could, for instance, add them to a playlist and embed that playlist on your site, or feature the playlist on the channel page of your own YouTube account.

    Designing a system that adheres to these best practices takes a little work, but avoiding the common pitfalls will pay off in the long run. For existing code that you could use as-is or adapt on your own site, take a look at the YouTube Direct project. It consists of code that uses AuthSub, browser-based uploads, developer tags, and playlists to allow the users of any website to contribute video uploads.

    Cheers,
    —Jeff Posnick, YouTube API Team
    URL: http://apiblog.youtube.com/2012/02/video-uploads-from-your-sites-community.html

    Wednesday, February 15, 2012

    [Gd] Dev Channel Update for Chromebooks

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    Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update for Chromebooks


    The Dev channel has been updated to 18.0.1025.32 (Platform versions: 1660.34.0) for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48).

    This build contains a number of stability improvements. Additional changes:
    • 24450 - For users enrolled in an enterprise, the time zone setting is now editable by any user.
    • 25604, 20612- Fixes issues where using an incorrect proxy, or when there is limited connectivity would cause a spinner icon to be infinitely shown on the login screen.
    • 26127 - Fixes issues with streaming videos not being able to play in full screen mode.
    • Crash fixes
    Known issues:
    • 25971 -  Occasionally when switching tabs, the screen will not redraw the content to the new tab. Occurs most frequently when one tab contains Flash content. Workaround: Closing all tabs or restarting the machine resolves the issue.
    If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.

    Danielle Drew
    Google Chrome
    URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/02/dev-channel-update-for-chromebooks_15.html

    [Gd] Chrome Stable Update

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    Chrome Releases: Chrome Stable Update

    The Chrome Stable channel has been updated to 17.0.963.56 on Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome Frame.  This release fixes a number of stability and security issues in Chrome, and also includes a new version of Flash.  More info on the Flash update is available from Adobe.

    Security fixes and rewards:
    Please see the Chromium security page for more detail. Note that the referenced bugs may be kept private until a majority of our users are up to date with the fix.

    • [105803] High CVE-2011-3015: Integer overflows in PDF codecs. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (scarybeasts).
    • [$500] [106336] Medium CVE-2011-3016: Read-after-free with counter nodes. Credit to miaubiz.
    • [$1000] [108695] High CVE-2011-3017: Possible use-after-free in database handling. Credit to miaubiz.
    • [$1000] [110172] High CVE-2011-3018: Heap overflow in path rendering. Credit to Aki Helin of OUSPG.
    • [110849] High CVE-2011-3019: Heap buffer overflow in MKV handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (scarybeasts) and Mateusz Jurczyk of the Google Security Team.
    • [111575] Medium CVE-2011-3020: Native client validator error. Credit to Nick Bray of the Chromium development community.
    • [$1000] [111779] High CVE-2011-3021: Use-after-free in subframe loading. Credit to Arthur Gerkis.
    • [112236] Medium CVE-2011-3022: Inappropriate use of http for translation script. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Jorge Obes).
    • [$500] [112259] Medium CVE-2011-3023: Use-after-free with drag and drop. Credit to pa_kt.
    • [112451] Low CVE-2011-3024: Browser crash with empty x509 certificate. Credit to chrometot.
    • [$500] [112670] Medium CVE-2011-3025: Out-of-bounds read in h.264 parsing. Credit to Sławomir Błażek.
    • [$1337] [112822] High CVE-2011-3026: Integer overflow / truncation in libpng. Credit to Jüri Aedla.
    • [112847] Medium CVE-2011-3027: Bad cast in column handling. Credit to miaubiz.
    The bugs [106336], [106336], [110172], [110849], [111779] and [112847] were detected using AddressSanitizer.

    More detailed updates are available on the Chrome Blog.  Full details about what changes are in this release are available in the SVN revision log.  Interested in hopping on the stable channel?  Find out how.  If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

    Jason Kersey
    Google Chrome
    URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/02/chrome-stable-update.html

    [Gd] Dev Channel Update

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    Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Update

    The Dev channel has been updated to 19.0.1041.0 for Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome Frame.  This build contains following stability and bug fixes:


    Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels?  Find out how.  If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

    Dharani Govindan
    Google Chrome


    URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/02/dev-channel-update_14.html

    [Gd] Falling in love with the Google+ API

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    The official Google Code blog: Falling in love with the Google+ API


    By Melina Mattos, Program Manager for Google Africa and Bob Aman, Program Manager for Developer Relations

    Cross-posted from the Google Africa Blog

    Attention developers! Of the 90+ Google APIs, which is your favorite? We know that we fell in love with the Google+ API after we saw the amazing applications built from the Hackathons in South Africa and Kenya. We want to continue spreading the love!

    This Valentine’s Day we’re thrilled to announce that we are holding three more Google+ Hackathons with the support of the Google Technology User Groups (GTUGs) in Accra, Kampala, and Lagos.

    If you are ready to wow us with your application, please apply for the event using these forms: Kampala on March 10 at the 4th floor of Solis House, Lagos on March 17 at the CCHub Nigeria, and Accra on March 21 at the Meltwater Entrepreneurial School of Technology.

    Remember to start today on getting those creative juices flowing! Familiarize yourself with the API and review these resources. Begin gathering ideas and coding a little. Take advantage of the Google+ Platform Office Hours on the 15th of February. If you have any questions, please address them to us in our Google+ Hangout on February 23. Use the Hackathon to perfect your application and win one of the multiple prizes we will be awarding - including a ticket for the overall winning application to Google’s premiere developer event, Google I/O!

    Any updates relating to these Hackathons and the Hangout will be posted on Google+ (of course!) using the hashtag #hackgplus. Stay tuned!


    Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
    URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2012/02/falling-in-love-with-google-api.html

    [Gd] Building Web Apps? Check out our Field Guide

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    The official Google Code blog: Building Web Apps? Check out our Field Guide

    Author Photo
    By Pete LePage, Developer Advocate

    Yesterday, the Chrome Developer Relations team launched several new resources, including the Field Guide to Web Applications. It’s a new resource that is designed to help web developers create great web apps. We’ve heard loud and clear from users that they want more and better web apps, and we hope this new field guide will enable you to create those web apps. Our fictitious author Bert Appward guides you through topics like the properties of web applications, design fundamentals, tips for creating great experiences, and a few case studies that put best practices to use. Whether you're building your first web app or are just looking for ways to improve your existing apps, I hope you'll find the field guide useful.




    We built the field guide to embody the principles and best practices that it preaches. We stepped away from the normal webpage look, and instead designed the experience around a field guide. We used many CSS3 features like box-shadow, opacity, multiple backgrounds and more to provide a rich, visual experience. To make sure that it worked offline, we used AppCache and other than some URL rewriting techniques, didn't use any server-side code. We used the HTML5 History API to maintain page state even though everything is served from a single HTML page. We've started working on a new case study about the field guide, so check back soon for that!


    Pete LePage is a Developer Advocate on the Google Chrome team and works with developers to create great web applications for the Chrome Web Store. He recently helped launch the +Chrome Developers page on Google+.

    Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
    URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2012/02/building-web-apps-check-out-our-field.html

    Tuesday, February 14, 2012

    [Gd] Changes in Chrome Web Store categories system

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    Chromium Blog: Changes in Chrome Web Store categories system

    When we launched the Chrome Web Store a year ago, our app taxonomy system reflected the apps that were available in the store at the time. However, since then, the store’s app inventory has grown and changed in composition. So, yesterday we made important changes in the Chrome Web Store’s app category system to allow more great apps of all kinds to stand out.

    Until now, you could list your app into two categories. With the new category structure, we will show your app only in the primary category that you select for your app in the developer dashboard. We've found that secondary app categories contributed to a confusing experience for Chrome users and developers so from now on, we're going to start ignoring the secondary category.

    We also updated the list of top level app categories and created multiple sub categories in each of them.

    More specifically, given the growing use of Chrome and Chromebooks in large and small businesses, we created a new category called “Business Tools” that can help enterprise focused developers target these users. Also, “Shopping” has been reclassified as a subcategory, within the “Lifestyle” category.

    The new structure of the store will improve discoverability for apps. For example, users searching for a photo album app can now easily drill down to the “Photos” subcategory level and track down the app they are looking for. At the same time, apps assigned to a subcategory show up in the category page as well giving them wider exposure; an app in "Photos" will appear on both the "Photos" page and the "Entertainment" page.

    The categories will continue to evolve over time. To that effect, in the Developer Dashboard you will see a few more subcategory options than the ones that are live in the Chrome Web Store today. We plan to expose these subcategories to users once we confirm we have enough interesting apps in each one of them. In the meantime, items assigned to these subcategories will show up at a related subcategory. For example all items on “Online Documents & File Storage” will show up for now in “Office Tools”.

    This transition required our team to take a stab at automatically assigning all apps to one of our new categories / subcategories. Please take a look at the developer dashboard and make sure the placement of your app accurately reflects your business goals and the experience you offer.

    Learn more about these category changes on our developer site. If you have any questions about these changes, please don't hesitate to post to our developer forum.


    Posted by Jia Tam, Software Engineer
    URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2012/02/changes-in-chrome-web-store-categories.html

    [Gd] Image results now available from the Custom Search API

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    The official Google Code blog: Image results now available from the Custom Search API

    Author Photo
    By Nam Nguyen, Software Engineer

    Last year we added image results to Google Custom Search Engines to enable sites to offer image-only results that showcase photos and other digital images. For site owners who want more flexibility in presentation, they are also now available from the Custom Search API.

    Read more about accessing Image Results from the Custom Search API or try it out in the Custom Search API Explorer. For billing purposes, image queries will be treated the same as web queries. If you are still using the deprecated Google Image Search API, now’s a great time to switch!

    Below is an example of an image search to find small jpeg images of flowers:

    https://www.googleapis.com/customsearch/v1?key=YOUR_API_KEY&cx=YOUR_CSE_ID&q=flower&searchType=image&fileType=jpg&imgSize=small&alt=json

    With a valid key and cse id, here is a possible json result returned for an image item:
    {
    "kind": "customsearch#result",
    "title": "flower-photo",
    "htmlTitle": "\u003cb\u003eflower\u003c/b\u003e-photo",
    "link": "http://images.example.com/flowerphoto.jpg",
    "displayLink": "images.example.com",
    "snippet": "photo of flower",
    "htmlSnippet": "photo of \u003cb\u003eflower\u003c/b\u003e",
    "mime": "image/jpeg",
    "image": {
    "contextLink": "http://images.example.com/flowergallery.html",
    "height": 100,
    "width": 100,
    "byteSize": 6104,
    "thumbnailLink": "https://encrypted-tbn2.google.com/images?q=tbn:3x4MPL3",
    "thumbnailHeight": 82,
    "thumbnailWidth": 82
    }
    }

    which you can use to render the image in your own site.

    Note that you need to enable image search in your custom search engine control panel for the custom image search to work.


    Nam Nguyen works on the JSON/Atom Custom Search API, which lets developers retrieve and display results from Google Custom Search programmatically. He is dedicated to making developers' lives a little easier by providing a simple API.

    Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
    URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2012/02/image-results-now-available-from-custom.html

    [Gd] A fresh new look for HTML5Rocks.com

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    The official Google Code blog: A fresh new look for HTML5Rocks.com

    Author Photo
    By Eric Bidelman, Senior Developer Programs Engineer, Google Chrome Team

    Over the past year, HTML5Rocks.com has become a top destination for developers craving to learn more about HTML5. Today, we have over 60 articles and tutorials covering the latest HTML5 tech, published by 30 contributors from around the world! We've worked hard to bring great content to the site as quickly as possible, but it's been challenging to consolidate so much information as HTML5 continues to push the web forward and evolve at an accelerated pace.


    HTML5 Rocks logo

    Today, we're launching an updated HTML5Rocks with better tools for finding content, including an edgy new look and "rocking" logo. As our content expands, finding things becomes more important. To address this, we've created "persona pages" with catered content in 3 different verticals (Games, Business, Mobile). If you're one of those developers, finding content relevant to you should now be a snap. We've also consolidated many of the different components (Updates, Studio, Playground) into the main site and have deeply integrated the HTML5 technology classes to bring a better identity to the content.

    All in all, it's a little bit Punk and a little bit Rock and Roll.

    Lastly, if you're interested in contributing to the site, it's an open source project and we'd love to have your expertise. See our contributors guide.


    Eric Bidelman is a Senior Developer Programs Engineer on the Google Chrome Team and a core contributor to html5rocks.com. He is the author of the book Using the HTML5 Filesystem API.

    Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
    URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2012/02/fresh-new-look-for-html5rockscom.html

    [Gd] Image results now available from the Custom Search API

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    Google Custom Search: Image results now available from the Custom Search API

    Last year we added image results to Google Custom Search Engines to enable sites to offer image-only results that showcase photos and other digital images. For site owners who want more flexibility in presentation, they are also now available from the Custom Search API.

    Read more about accessing Image Results from the Custom Search API or try it out in the Custom Search API Explorer. For billing purposes, image queries will be treated the same as web queries. Note that you need to enable image search in your custom search engine control panel for the custom image search to work. 

    Let us know what you think in our discussion forum.

    Posted by: Nam Nguyen, Software Engineer
    URL: http://googlecustomsearch.blogspot.com/2012/02/image-results-now-available-from-custom.html

    [Gd] Beta Channel Update for Chromebooks

    | More

    Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update for Chromebooks


    The Beta channel has been updated to 17.0.963.54 (Platform versions: 1412.186) for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48).

    This update fixes a number of stability and UI issues.

    If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.

    Orit Mazor
    Google Chrome
    URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2012/02/beta-channel-update-for-chromebooks_13.html

    Monday, February 13, 2012

    [Gd] New resources for Chrome Developers

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    Chromium Blog: New resources for Chrome Developers

    All good things come in threes. So, this week, the Chrome Developer Relations team is releasing three new resources for developers.

    First, we are making available a brand new Field Guide to Web Applications, to help developers create great web apps. This guide walks you through topics like app design fundamentals, tips for creating great experiences and a few case studies that put the best practices to use. Whether you're building your first web app or are just looking for ways to improve your existing apps, we hope you'll find the field guide useful.


    Second, our popular HTML5 site, HTML5Rocks.com, was also remodeled to better organize the site's content. You’ll now find new "persona pages" with catered content in 3 different verticals (Games, Business, Mobile). In addition, we consolidated many of the different components, and deeply integrated the HTML5 technology classes to bring a better identity to the site.

    Finally, we've also joined Google+ with a new page specifically for Chrome Developers. Whether you’re building modern web apps, using Dart or WebRTC, we’ll be there to help you! Keep your eyes open for our weekly hangouts and add us to your circles.

    Posted by Eric Bidelman & Pete LePage
    URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2012/02/new-resources-for-chrome-developers.html

    [Gd] See you at the Game Developers Conference

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    The official Google Code blog: See you at the Game Developers Conference

    Author Photo
    By Amy Walgenbach, Developer Marketing Team

    We’re returning to the Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco this year with 2 Developer Days and a booth on the Expo floor. At the conference we'll be giving a peek at the latest technologies we're developing for games.

    Our Developer Days will take place in Room 2020 at Moscone Center. Day 1 (March 5) will focus on web games and Day 2 (March 6) will feature mobile games. From scalable servers, to high-performance code and graphics in web browsers, to porting console games to the web, come learn about how our technologies can help you better create, distribute, promote, and monetize games. We also have several Googlers speaking at other sessions during the conference. In addition, we'll have booth 1901 on the show floor March 7th-9th where you can meet Googlers working on games, demo what's new, meet partners, and get answers to your questions.

    For more information on our presence at GDC, including a full list of our talks and speaker details, please visit http://www.google.com/events/gdc. If you stop by, you might even be able to score a pass to Google’s invitation-only GDC party. We look forward to meeting you in person!


    Amy Walgenbach leads marketing for the Google+ Platform and developer marketing for games at Google.

    Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor

    URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2012/02/see-you-at-game-developers-conference.html