Saturday, September 3, 2011

[Gd] Google Desktop Update

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Google Desktop APIs: Google Desktop Update

In 2004, Google launched Google Desktop, a program designed to make it easy for users to search their own PCs for emails, files, music, photos, Web pages and more.



Desktop has been used by tens of millions of people and we’ve been humbled by its usage and great user feedback. However, over the past seven years we’ve also witnessed some big changes in how users store and access their own data, with many moving to web-based applications. There has been a significant shift from local to cloud-based storage and computing, as well as integration of Google Desktop functionality (like local search) into most modern operating systems. This is a positive development for users and we’re excited that most people now have instant access to their personal information. As such, we’ll be discontinuing support for Google Desktop, including all of the associated APIs, services, plugins and gadgets.



As of September 14, Google Desktop will no longer be available for download, and existing installations will not be updated to include new features or fixes.



Thanks again to all of our users. It’s been a fun journey.



Posted by the Google Desktop Team
URL: http://googledesktopapis.blogspot.com/2011/09/google-desktop-update.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Updates for Chromebooks

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Google Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Updates for Chromebooks

The Dev channel has been updated to 15.0.867.0 (Platform version: 972.0) for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48).



Highlights:
  • Fix several functionality and stability issues .
  • Updated New Tab Page
  • File Manager fixes
Known issues:
  • gmail : rendering issue seen on scrolling down long email thread (19931).
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. You can also submit feedback using "Report an issue" under the wrench icon. Interested in switching to the Beta channel? Find out how.


Josafat Garcia
Google Chrome


URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2011/09/dev-channel-updates-for-chromebooks.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update for Chromebooks

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Google Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update for Chromebooks

The Google Chrome team is happy to announce the release of Chrome 14 on the Beta Channel for Chromebooks (Acer AC700, Samsung Series 5, and Cr-48).



Chrome version 14.0.835.125 (Platform version: 811.77)



Release highlights:
  • A number of security and stability fixes
  • Update the Netflix plugin to 1.1.5
  • Update Pepper Flash to version 10.3.200.106
  • Turned accelerated compositing, smooth scrolling on
Known issues:
  • Issue 19726: 3G not activating for first time
  • Issue 19888: Video forward/backward doesn't work using a progress bar
If you find new issues, please let us know by visiting our help site or filing a bug. Interested in switching channels? Find out how. You can submit feedback using ‘Report an issue’ under the wrench menu.



Orit Mazor

Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2011/09/beta-channel-update-for-chromebooks.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Google Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

As part of Chrome's 3rd birthday celebration, we're happy to announce what you've all been waiting for: a third Beta channel release for this week! The Chrome Beta channel has been updated to 14.0.835.126 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame.  This release has disabled accelerated 2D canvas for Windows, along with other stability fixes.  Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log.  Interested in switching to the Beta channel?  Find out how.  If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2011/09/beta-channel-update.html

[Gd] Fridaygram: Blogger revamping, celestial redecorating, robots rambling

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The official Google Code blog: Fridaygram: Blogger revamping, celestial redecorating, robots rambling


By Scott Knaster, Google Code Blog Editor

Blogger rolled out some nice new stuff this week. It’s different inside and out. As a heavy user of Blogger (you’re soaking in it!), I’m happy with anything that helps us make a better blog for you to read. If you have a Blogger blog of your own, here are a couple of the changes you’ll notice:
  • Each settings page has a button that starts a new post. Creating posts is what bloggers do most, and now you always can get to the post editor with one click.
  • You can see traffic and other stats in one place. The new Overview page shows you page views, comment activity, follower counts, and more.
For more information on what’s new in Blogger, and to find out how to turn on the new features, see this Blogger Buzz post.

Adding features to software is hard enough. Bumping celestial bodies around is another matter entirely. Hexi Baoyin of Tsinghua University has suggested giving a gentle shove to an asteroid so that it ends up in Earth orbit. Why? For science!

Of course, technology of the future involves more than just potentially rearranging our solar system. For example, check out what happened when two chatbots had a conversation. Looks kind of like the pilot for a new TV show.

We love science, technology, fun, and Fridays. So most weeks we put all those things together and write Fridaygram, a post that’s not meant to be taken too seriously.

URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2011/09/fridaygram-blogger-revamping-celestial.html

Friday, September 2, 2011

[Gd] Resolving Conflicts after Google Apps Account Migration

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AdWords API Blog: Resolving Conflicts after Google Apps Account Migration

Recently, we have migrated the Google Apps accounts to a new infrastructure that includes all Personal Google accounts. This has introduced a conflict for API users who have the same email address for both types of accounts. As a result, you will not be able to generate a ClientLogin token and will be presented with an error message such as “Either this object does not exist, or this user does not have permission to access it”, “Invalid client email specified” or an AuthenticationError.CLIENT_EMAIL_INVALID in the SOAP response. You can also verify whether your account is in conflict by making a request directly to the Client Login API.

Request:
https://www.google.com/accounts/ClientLogin?accountType=GOOGLE&Email=my_email_address&Passwd=my_password

Response:
Error=Unknown
Url=https://www.google.com/accounts/ErrorMsg?Email=my_email_address&service=gam&id=unknown

Before the migration, it was possible to have a Google Apps account with your domain (jane@altostrat.com) and a Personal Google account for AdWords, Picasa, Reader, etc. with the same email address. With the new infrastructure, both types of accounts are in one unified system so when you try to generate a ClientLogin token with jane@altostrat.com, we do not know which account you are trying to use. More details about conflicting accounts can be found at the Google Accounts Help Article.



To differentiate between your conflicting accounts, we have created a temporary account (jane%altostrat.com@gtempaccount.com) for you to temporarily hold your data. You can log into http://www.google.com/accounts with your gtempaccount and use the wizard to resolve your conflicts. A full walkthrough on the data migration wizard can be found at the Data Migration Getting Started Guide.

Please note that this issue will only affect tools built using clientEmail as a header to identify accounts. If you use clientCustomerId, the tool will not be affected. We recommend using clientCustomerId instead of clientEmail as a best practice.

As always, please post any questions to the forum.

, AdWords API Team
URL: http://adwordsapi.blogspot.com/2011/09/resolving-conflicts-after-google-apps.html

[Gd] Google APIs Client Library for .NET (Beta)

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The official Google Code blog: Google APIs Client Library for .NET (Beta)

Yaniv
Matthias
By Yaniv Inbar and Matthias Linder, Client APIs Team

Over the last year, we’ve launched a number of developer APIs, such as the Tasks API, the Books API, the Search API for Shopping, and the CustomSearch API. At Google I/O we announced a number of developer tools, such as the APIs Explorer and the APIs Console. Over that time, we have been actively developing a library to support the Microsoft .NET Framework.

Today we are announcing a major milestone by releasing the Beta version of the open source Google APIs Client Library for .NET. This includes service-specific libraries and samples for Google APIs, built on our new client library generation infrastructure. We're now comfortable enough with the stability and features of the library that we want you to start building real production applications. Currently we support Microsoft .NET 3.5 and 4.0 and Mono 2.6.7 (and higher). In the future we hope to also support Windows Phone 7 and Microsoft Silverlight.

To demonstrate how easy to use the library can be, here is a snippet from the goo.gl sample to shorten a URL using the goo.gl service:

// Create an instance of the UrlShortener-service.
var service = new UrlshortenerService();

// Make a "Shorten URL" request.
string urlToShorten = "http://maps.google.com/";
Url response =
  service
.Url.Insert(new Url { LongUrl = urlToShorten }).Fetch();

// Print the shortened url.
string shortUrl = response.Id;
Console.WriteLine(urlToShorten + " -> " + shortUrl);
To use this code, you only have to add references to the Google APIs Client Library for .NET, and the Google.Apis.Urlshortener.v1.dll.

Please send us your feedback on how we can make your experience with the library easier and better suited for your needs.

Yaniv Inbar is a Senior Software Engineer and Technical Lead of the Google APIs Client Libraries & Tools team. Yaniv has worked at Google for 5 years, and has a total of 12 years industry experience as a software engineer.

Matthias Linder is a Software Engineering Intern. Matthias is interested in game development, microcontrollers, and paragliding.


Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2011/09/google-apis-client-library-for-net-beta.html

[Gd] The 10 Minute Test Plan

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Google Testing Blog: The 10 Minute Test Plan


By James Whittaker

Anything in software development that takes ten minutes or less to perform is either trivial or is not worth doing in the first place. If you take this rule of thumb at face value, where do you place test planning? Certainly it takes more than 10 minutes. In my capacity as Test Director at Google I presided over teams that wrote a large number of test plans and every time I asked how long one would take I was told “tomorrow” or “the end of the week” and a few times, early in the day, I was promised one “by the end of the day.” So I’ll establish the task of test planning to be of the hours-to-days duration.

As to whether it is worth doing, well, that is another story entirely. Every time I look at any of the dozens of test plans my teams have written, I see dead test plans. Plans written, reviewed, referred to a few times and then cast aside as the project moves in directions not documented in the plan. This begs the question: if a plan isn’t worth bothering to update, is it worth creating in the first place?

Other times a plan is discarded because it went into too much detail or too little; still others because it provided value only in starting a test effort and not in the ongoing work. Again, if this is the case, was the plan worth the cost of creating it given its limited and diminishing value?

Some test plans document simple truths that likely didn’t really need documenting at all or provide detailed information that isn’t relevant to the day to day job of a software tester. In all these cases we are wasting effort. Let’s face facts here: there is a problem with the process and content of test plans.

To combat this, I came up with a simple task for my teams: write a test plan in 10 minutes. The idea is simple, if test plans have any value at all then let’s get to that value as quickly as possible.

Given ten minutes, there is clearly no room for fluff. It is a time period so compressed that every second must be spent doing something useful or any hope you have of actually finishing the task is gone. This was the entire intent behind the exercise from my point of view: boil test planning down to only the essentials and cut all fat and fluff. Do only what is absolutely necessary and leave the details to the test executors as opposed to the test planners. If I wanted to end the practice of writing test plans that don’t stand the test of time, this seemed a worthwhile exercise.

However, I didn’t tell the people in the experiment any of this. I told them only: here is an app, create a test plan in 10 minutes or less. Remember that these people work for me and, technically, are paid to do as I tell them. And, again technically I am uniquely positioned to begin termination procedures with respect to their Google employment. On top of that I am presuming they have some measure of respect for me, which means they were likely convinced I actually thought they could do it. This was important to me. I wanted them to expect to succeed!

As preparation they could spend some time with the app in question and familiarize themselves with it. However, since many of the apps we used (Google Docs, App Engine, Talk Video, etc.) were tools they used every week, this time was short.

So here's how the task progressed:

They started, did some work and when ten minutes passed I interrupted them. They stated they weren't done yet. I responded by telling them they were out of time, nice try, here's a different problem to work on. 10 minutes later, the same thing happened and I changed the problem again. They began working faster and trying different angles, things that were too time consuming or not worth the effort got jettisoned really quick!

In each case, the teams came up with techniques that helped speed things along. They chose to jot down lists and create grids over writing long paragraphs of prose. Sentences … yes, paragraphs … no. They wasted little time on formatting and explanations and chose instead to document capabilities. Indeed, capabilities or what the software actually does, were the one commonality of all the plans. Capabilities were the one thing that all the teams gravitated toward as the most useful way to spend the little time they were given.

The three things that emerged as most important:

1. Attributes the adverbs and adjectives that describe the high level concepts testing is meant to ensure. Attributes such as fast, usable, secure, accessible and so forth.

2. Components the nouns that define the major code chunks that comprise the product. These are classes, module names and features of the application.

3. Capabilities the verbs that describe user actions and activities.

None of the teams finished the experiment in the 10 minutes allotted. However, in 10 minutes they were all able to get through both the Attributes and Components (or things that served a similar purpose) and begin documenting Capabilities. At the end of an additional 20 minutes most of the experiments had a large enough set of Capabilities that it would have been a useful starting point for creating user stories or test cases.

Which, at least to me, made the experiment a success. I gave them 10 minutes and hoped for an hour. They had 80% of the work complete in 30 minutes. And really isn’t 80% enough? We know full well that we are not going to test everything so why document everything? We know full well that as we start testing, things (schedules, requirements, architecture, etc.) are going to change so insisting on planning precision when nothing else obeys such a calling for completeness seems out of touch with reality.

80% complete in 30 minutes or less. Now that’s what I call a 10 minute test plan!
URL: http://googletesting.blogspot.com/2011/09/10-minute-test-plan.html

[Gd] Unshare domain user’s contact information programmatically using the Google Apps Profiles API

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Google Apps Developer Blog: Unshare domain user’s contact information programmatically using the Google Apps Profiles API

Domain administrators can create new users for their domain using the control panel web UI and the Google Apps Provisioning API. Once the new users are created, editing their contact information (such as their addresses, phone numbers, etc) can be done using the Google Apps Profiles API. These profiles are shown to everybody in the organization when searching for users in GMail’s Contacts Manager and GMail’s autocomplete feature.



Some users want enhanced privacy but unsharing a user’s contact information could only be done using the control panel web UI.





We just introduced a new element in the Google Apps Profiles API that lets domain administrators set this option programmatically. This new field is called gContact:status and is available under a User Profile entry:

<gcontact:status indexed="true"/>
Changing the indexed attribute value to false unshares the user contact’s information when “contact sharing” is enabled on the domain.



For more information about the Google Apps Profiles API and code samples for supported languages using our client libraries, please refer to the developer’s guide. To learn how you can use 2-legged OAuth and batch requests to programmatically unshare users contact’s information with our client libraries, please have a look at this article.



Alain Vongsouvanh profile | events



Alain is a Developer Programs Engineer for Google Apps with a focus on Google Calendar and Google Contacts. Before Google, he graduated with his Masters in Computer Science from EPITA, France.




Want to weigh in on this topic? Discuss on Buzz
URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2011/08/unshare-domain-users-contact.html

[Gd] Using Google Tasks API and OAuth 2.0 on Android

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Google Apps Developer Blog: Using Google Tasks API and OAuth 2.0 on Android



Since we launched the Google Tasks API we have received a warm welcome from the developer community on the public forum, and a lot of question on how to make it work with OAuth 2.0 on Android. Let's see how this can be done.



Android has its own native authorization flow and its own way of handling Google accounts as you can register them on your device. Since Android 2.0, the AccountManager manages the accounts that you have registered - the ones that are listed under Settings > Accounts & sync. Specifically, it handles the authorization flow and can generate authorization tokens that are required to access data using APIs.

Accounts registered in your Android environment


You can use the AccountManager to get the Google account you want to access the Tasks for. Though as the AccountManager also manages accounts from other vendors you can simply instantiate a GoogleAccountManager which is provided in the Google APIs Client library for Java and only handles Google accounts:
GoogleAccountManager googleAccountManager = new GoogleAccountManager(

activity);

Account[] accounts = accountManager.getAccounts();
If more than one Google accounts are available on the Android device you should prompt the user for the account he wishes to use through a dialog.



Now that the user has chosen an account (or if there was only 1 Google account) you can ask the AccountManager to issue an authorization token for the Tasks API. This is done by calling the AccountManager.getAuthToken() method. The AccountManager will take care of contacting the Google APIs authorization endpoint and run the AccountManagerCallback that you have defined in the method call when it has retrieved an authorization token:
googleAccountManager.manager.getAuthToken(account, AUTH_TOKEN_TYPE, null,

activity, new AccountManagerCallback<Bundle>() {

public void run(AccountManagerFuture<Bundle> future) {

try {

// If the user has authorized your application to use the tasks API

// a token is available.

String token = future.getResult().getString(

AccountManager.KEY_AUTHTOKEN);

// Now you can use the Tasks API...

useTasksAPI(token);

} catch (OperationCanceledException e) {

// TODO: The user has denied you access to the API, you

// should handle that

} catch (Exception e) {

handleException(e);

}

}

}, null);
The Android AccountManager has support for OAuth 2.0. A user friendly AUTH_TOKEN_TYPE exists for the Tasks API which will make the AccountManager return an OAuth 2.0 access token:

String AUTH_TOKEN_TYPE = ”Manage your tasks”;
During the AccountManager.getAuthToken() call the AccountManager will check if your application has been authorized to access the Tasks API. If your application has not yet been authorized the user will be presented with an authorization dialog so that they can Allow or Deny your application to use the Tasks API on their account.

Authorization dialog


Another piece of getting the Tasks API to work using OAuth 2.0 on Android is that you also need to specify an API Key when making calls to the Tasks API. The API Key is mandatory as it identifies your application and therefore allows the API to deduct quota and use the quota rules defined for your project. You can get it from the Google APIs Console at API Access > Simple API Access > API Key. You need to specify the API Key on your Tasks service Object:

useTasksAPI(String accessToken) {

// Setting up the Tasks API Service

HttpTransport transport = AndroidHttp.newCompatibleTransport();

AccessProtectedResource accessProtectedResource =

new GoogleAccessProtectedResource(accessToken);

Tasks service = new Tasks(transport, accessProtectedResource,

new JacksonFactory());

service.setKey(INSERT_YOUR_API_KEY);

service.setApplicationName("Google-TasksSample/1.0");



// TODO: now use the service to query the Tasks API

}
At this point you should have a fully setup Tasks API service Object which you can use to query the API as per the Tasks API developer’s Guide.



If you would like to get more tips and learn more about getting the Google Tasks API and OAuth 2.0 working on Android please have a look at our newly published article.



Also we recently added a new sample to the Google APIs Client Library for Java sample repository to help you getting started with the Tasks API and OAuth 2.0 on Android.



Nicolas Garnier profile | twitter | events



Nicolas joined Google’s Developer Relations in 2008. Since then he's worked on commerce oriented products such as Google Checkout and Google Base. Currently, he is working on Google Apps with a focus on the Google Calendar API, the Google Contacts API, and the Tasks API. Before joining Google, Nicolas worked at Airbus and at the French Space Agency where he built web applications for scientific researchers.




Want to weigh in on this topic? Discuss on Buzz
URL: http://googleappsdeveloper.blogspot.com/2011/08/using-google-tasks-api-and-oauth-20-on.html

[Gd] PDFs in Google search results

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Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: PDFs in Google search results

Webmaster level: All



Our mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. During this ambitious quest, we sometimes encounter non-HTML files such as PDFs, spreadsheets, and presentations. Our algorithms don’t let different filetypes slow them down; we work hard to extract the relevant content and to index it appropriately for our search results. But how do we actually index these filetypes, and—since they often differ so much from standard HTML—what guidelines apply to these files? What if a webmaster doesn’t want us to index them?







Google first started indexing PDF files in 2001 and currently has hundreds of millions of PDF files indexed. We’ve collected the most often-asked questions about PDF indexing; here are the answers:



Q: Can Google index any type of PDF file?

A: Generally we can index textual content (written in any language) from PDF files that use various kinds of character encodings, provided they’re not password protected or encrypted. If the text is embedded as images, we may process the images with OCR algorithms to extract the text. The general rule of the thumb is that if you can copy and paste the text from a PDF document into a standard text document, we should be able to index that text.



Q: What happens with the images in PDF files?

A: Currently the images are not indexed. In order for us to index your images, you should create HTML pages for them. To increase the likelihood of us returning your images in our search results, please read the tips in our Help Center.



Q: How are links treated in PDF documents?

A: Generally links in PDF files are treated similarly to links in HTML: they can pass PageRank and other indexing signals, and we may follow them after we have crawled the PDF file. It’s currently not possible to "nofollow" links within a PDF document.



Q: How can I prevent my PDF files from appearing in search results; or if they already do, how can I remove them?

A: The simplest way to prevent PDF documents from appearing in search results is to add an X-Robots-Tag: noindex in the HTTP header used to serve the file. If they’re already indexed, they’ll drop out over time if you use the X-Robot-Tag with the noindex directive. For faster removals, you can use the URL removal tool in Google Webmaster Tools.



Q: Can PDF files rank highly in the search results?

A: Sure! They’ll generally rank similarly to other webpages. For example, at the time of this post, [mortgage market review], [irs form 2011] or [paracetamol expert report] all return PDF documents that manage to rank highly in our search results, thanks to their content and the way they’re embedded and linked from other webpages.



Q: Is it considered duplicate content if I have a copy of my pages in both HTML and PDF?

A: Whenever possible, we recommend serving a single copy of your content. If this isn’t possible, make sure you indicate your preferred version by, for example, including the preferred URL in your Sitemap or by specifying the canonical version in the HTML or in the HTTP headers of the PDF resource. For more tips, read our Help Center article about canonicalization.



Q: How can I influence the title shown in search results for my PDF document?

A: We use two main elements to determine the title shown: the title metadata within the file, and the anchor text of links pointing to the PDF file. To give our algorithms a strong signal about the proper title to use, we recommend updating both.



If you want to learn more, watch Matt Cutt’s video about PDF files’ optimization for search, and visit our Help Center for information about the content types we’re able to index. If you have feedback or suggestions, please let us know in the Webmaster Help Forum.





Posted by , Webmaster Trends Analyst
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2011/09/pdfs-in-google-search-results.html

Thursday, September 1, 2011

[Gd] Reorganizing internal vs. external backlinks

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Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Reorganizing internal vs. external backlinks

Webmaster level: All

Today we’re making a change to the way we categorize link data in Webmaster Tools. As you know, Webmaster Tools lists links pointing to your site in two separate categories: links coming from other sites, and links from within your site. Today’s update won’t change your total number of links, but will hopefully present your backlinks in a way that more closely aligns with your idea of which links are actually from your site vs. from other sites.

You can manage many different types of sites in Webmaster Tools: a plain domain name (example.com), a subdomain (www.example.com or cats.example.com), or a domain with a subfolder path (www.example.com/cats/ or www.example.com/users/catlover/). Previously, only links that started with your site’s exact URL would be categorized as internal links: so if you entered www.example.com/users/catlover/ as your site, links from www.example.com/users/catlover/profile.html would be categorized as internal, but links from www.example.com/users/ or www.example.com would be categorized as external links. This also meant that if you entered www.example.com as your site, links from example.com would be considered external because they don’t start with the same URL as your site (they don’t contain www).

Most people think of example.com and www.example.com as the same site these days, so we’re changing it such that now, if you add either example.com or www.example.com as a site, links from both the www and non-www versions of the domain will be categorized as internal links. We’ve also extended this idea to include other subdomains, since many people who own a domain also own its subdomains—so links from cats.example.com or pets.example.com will also be categorized as internal links for www.example.com.




Links for www.google.comExternal linksInternal links
Previously categorized as...www.example.com/
www.example.org/stuff.html
scholar.google.com/
sketchup.google.com/
google.com/
www.google.com/
www.google.com/stuff.html
www.google.com/support/webmasters/
Now categorized as...www.example.com/
www.example.org/stuff.html
scholar.google.com/
sketchup.google.com/
google.com/
www.google.com/
www.google.com/stuff.html
www.google.com/support/webmasters/

If you own a site that’s on a subdomain (such as googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com) or in a subfolder (www.google.com/support/webmasters/) and don’t own the root domain, you’ll still only see links from URLs starting with that subdomain or subfolder in your internal links, and all others will be categorized as external links. We’ve made a few backend changes so that these numbers should be even more accurate for you.

Note that, if you own a root domain like example.com or www.example.com, your number of external links may appear to go down with this change; this is because, as described above, some of the URLs we were previously classifying as external links will have moved into the internal links report. Your total number of links (internal + external) should not be affected by this change.

As always, drop us a comment or join our Webmaster Help Forum if you have questions!

Posted by , Webmaster Trends Analyst
URL: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2011/08/reorganizing-internal-vs-external.html

[Gd] Google DevFest Tour - save the date

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The official Google Code blog: Google DevFest Tour - save the date


By Christine Songco Lau, Developer Relations

Last year, the Google DevFest Tour gathered thousands of developers collectively around the world. Attendees heard from peers in the community already running their businesses on the Google platform. Googlers working on various Google developer products and APIs were on hand to talk about the latest and greatest, with best practices on how to improve the quality of web and mobile apps.


To continue giving you the opportunity to interact with us and get feedback, we’ve decided to announce another tour, in addition to the recently announced Google Developer Days. We’ve updated the 2011 DevFest site with tour cities and dates. We will continue to update the site with more detailed information such as venue location, agenda, and registration.

Please remember that space is limited at each location. We cannot guarantee that everyone will be able to secure a spot. We highly recommended you register early and check back for event updates. We'll email confirmations, which you can then use as your tickets to these events.

See you at DevFest!

Christine Songco Lau works with developers in Southeast Asia and on various global developer events such as Google I/O & Google DevFests. Christine likes to travel, scuba dive, and snowboard in her spare time.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor


URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2011/08/google-devfest-tour-save-date.html

[Gd] Register now for Google Developer Day Czech Republic

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The official Google Code blog: Register now for Google Developer Day Czech Republic


By Monica Tran, Developer Marketing Team

Registration is now open for Google Developer Day in Prague, Czech Republic. Check out the website for the latest updates to the agenda. To register, visit the home page and click on the blue “Register Now” button.

Mark your calendars. Registration for our last GDD events, in Germany and Israel, will open on September 15th.

In the past four years, Monica Tran has been around the world, working as a Product Marketing Manager in Mountain View, London, and Tokyo. After a good run on Google I/O, Monica is back to lead the charge on Google Developer Day, happening in 8 cities worldwide in 2011.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor
URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2011/08/register-now-for-google-developer-day_31.html

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

| More

Google Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

The Beta channel has been updated to 14.0.835.124 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame.  This release contains fixes for a number of plugin stability issues and other bugs.  Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log.  Interested in switching to the Beta channel?  Find out how.  If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2011/08/beta-channel-update_31.html

[Gd] Google @ GDC Online Oct. 10th-12th

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Chromium Blog: Google @ GDC Online Oct. 10th-12th

Cross posted at the Google Code blog



This year at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) Online we have organized a Developer Day on Oct. 10th full of Google information for game developers. It will feature hardcore technical information on Google products and platforms delivered by Google engineers and developer advocates. We’ll discuss the latest projects we’re working on and how our online technologies can help you better create, distribute, and monetize games that reach a larger audience than ever before. We’ll present everything from how developers can build hardware accelerated 3D games for the browser with WebGL to the game framework used to bring Angry Birds to the Web.



In addition to the Developer Day, we will also have a booth on the Expo floor on Oct. 11th-12th where we’ll have representatives from the Chrome Web Store, Native Client, WebGL, App Engine, Google+, In-App Payments, Google TV, and AdSense/AdMob demoing technologies and platforms for game developers. Come by booth 503 to try out Google products and ask questions, or hang out in our Google TV lounge.



For more information on our presence at GDC Online, including session and speaker details, please visit http://www.google.com/events/gdc/2011. Hope to see you in Austin!



Not able to attend GDC? Check out Google Game Developer Central to get an overview of Google products and services that are particularly relevant to game developers.



Posted by Amy Walgenbach, Developer Marketing
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2011/08/google-gdc-online-oct-10th-12th.html

[Gd] A new Objective-C library for a new generation of APIs

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The official Google Code blog: A new Objective-C library for a new generation of APIs

Greg
Tom
By Greg Robbins and Tom Van Lenten, Software Engineers

Four years ago, we introduced an Objective-C library for Google Data APIs. At first, it supported a scant three services - Google Base, Calendar, and Spreadsheets. Perhaps more surprising is that it was written just for Mac applications; the iPhone SDK was still a year off. In the years since, the library has grown to support 16 APIs, and has been used in many hundreds of applications. In a fine example of unforeseen consequences, most of those applications run not on the Mac but on iOS.

The Google Data APIs were built on XML and the Atom Publishing Protocol, a reasonable industry standard for the time. But mobile, low-power, and bandwidth-limited computers are now the biggest audience for client software. Across the Internet, XML and AtomPub have given way to the lighter-weight JSON data interchange format.

Other fundamental changes have also shifted the API landscape. Password-based authentication is being supplanted by the more secure and flexible OAuth 2 standard. The number of APIs has grown dramatically, making it impractical to hand-craft data classes for all APIs and all languages. When services offer API improvements, developers want access to those changes as quickly as possible.

To support this evolving world, we are introducing a brand new library for Cocoa developers, the Google APIs Client Library for Objective-C. The library supports recent Google JSON APIs, including Tasks, Latitude, Books, URL Shortener, and many others. It is designed to make efficient use of the device’s processor and memory, so it’s a great fit for iOS applications.

The new library includes high-level Objective-C interfaces and data classes for each service, generated from the Google APIs Discovery Service. This lets the library model data not just as generic JSON dictionaries, but also with first-class Objective-C 2.0 objects. The classes include properties for each field, letting developers take advantage of Xcode’s code completion and syntax and type checking.

Here’s how easy it is to use the library and the new Google Books API to search for and print the titles of free ebooks by Samuel Clemens:
#import "GTLBooks.h"

GTLServiceBooks *service = [[GTLServiceBooks alloc] init];

GTLQueryBooks *query =
[GTLQueryBooks queryForVolumesListWithQ:@"Mark Twain"];
query.filter = kGTLBooksFilterFreeEbooks;

[service executeQuery:query
completionHandler:^(GTLServiceTicket *ticket,
id object, NSError *error) {
// callback
if (error == nil) {
GTLBooksVolumes *results = object;
for (GTLBooksVolume *volume in results) {
NSLog(@"%@", volume.volumeInfo.title);
}
}
}];
The library supports Google’s partial response and partial update protocols, so even items of data-rich APIs can be retrieved and updated with minimal network overhead. It also offers a simple, efficient batch model, so many queries can be combined into one http request and response, speeding up applications.

When we introduced the previous Objective-C library, it was with this assertion: When you trust your personal data to Google, it's still your data. You're free to edit it, to share it with others, or to download it and take it somewhere else entirely. We hope the new library and Google’s growing collection of APIs help iOS and Mac developers to keep that principle meaningful for many years to come. You can start using the Google APIs Client Library for Objective-C by checking it out from our open-source project site and by subscribing to the discussion group.

Greg Robbins writes code to connect Mac and iOS apps to Internet services. He chases dogs in the morning, and bugs in the afternoon.

Tom Van Lenten is a Software Engineer on the Google Chrome team. He is also hooked on the Google Toolbox for Mac open source projects.


Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor


URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2011/08/new-objective-c-library-for-new.html

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

[Gd] $50 Credit for new billing signups and budget changes

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Google App Engine Blog: $50 Credit for new billing signups and budget changes




At Google I/O this year, we announced that App Engine will be going out of preview before the end of the year.  One aspect of leaving preview is our new pricing model.  As promised we have started providing the ability for any application Admin to compare their existing cost to their new costs in the Admin Console (under “Billing History”).  Now that you have an idea of what changes may impact your app, we’ve also written an article to help you optimize your application.  We know many of you would rather code than think about your budget and billing settings, so to help with the transition we are extending a one-time courtesy credit of $50 to all free Apps that sign up for billing and all paid Apps that modify their budgets between now and October 31, 2011.  Once you have signed up or made changes to your billing settings, a $50 credit will appear in the “Billing History” area of the Admin Console for your application. For more information on how to enable billing or change your settings, please see Billing and Budgeting Resources.





This is a big step for the App Engine Team; thank you for your continued support and feedback, and we hope you find these tools useful as we get closer to our goal of leaving preview!




Posted by the App Engine Team

URL: http://googleappengine.blogspot.com/2011/08/50-credit-for-new-billing-signups-and.html

[Gd] Google @ GDC Online Oct. 10th-12th

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The official Google Code blog: Google @ GDC Online Oct. 10th-12th


By Amy Walgenbach, Developer Marketing

This year at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) Online we have organized a Developer Day on Oct. 10th full of Google information for game developers. It will feature hardcore technical information on Google products and platforms delivered by Google engineers and developer advocates. We’ll discuss the latest projects we’re working on and how our online technologies can help you better create, distribute, and monetize games that reach a larger audience than ever before. We’ll present everything from how developers can build hardware accelerated 3D games for the browser with WebGL to the game framework used to bring Angry Birds to the Web.

In addition to the Developer Day, we will also have a booth on the Expo floor on Oct. 11th-12th where we’ll have representatives from the Chrome Web Store, Native Client, WebGL, App Engine, Google+, In-App Payments, Google TV, and AdSense/AdMob demoing technologies and platforms for game developers. Come by booth 503 to try out Google products and ask questions, or hang out in our Google TV lounge.

For more information on our presence at GDC Online, including session and speaker details, please visit http://www.google.com/events/gdc/2011. Hope to see you in Austin!

Not able to attend GDC? Check out Google Game Developer Central to get an overview of Google products and services that are particularly relevant to game developers.

Amy Walgenbach is the Product Marketing lead for the Google+ platform and leads developer marketing for games at Google.

Posted by Scott Knaster, Editor

URL: http://googlecode.blogspot.com/2011/08/google-gdc-online-oct-10th-12th.html

[Gd] Non-Admin Chrome Frame Reaches Stable Channel

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Chromium Blog: Non-Admin Chrome Frame Reaches Stable Channel

A few months ago, we introduced Non-Admin Google Chrome Frame on the developer channel for testing. We deployed it to the beta channel two weeks ago and we are now bringing Non-Admin to the stable channel. Head over here to install it and let us know how it goes.



If you have installed the developer or beta channel version and wish to switch to the stable version, you'll need to uninstall Chrome Frame and then install via the above link. Note that the uninstall experience is smoothest if you close all Internet Explorer windows prior to uninstalling Chrome Frame.



In addition to Non-Admin Chrome Frame moving to the stable channel, we are rolling out a change to the default Chrome Frame installer; it will now run at Admin level by default and will fall back to Non-Admin mode if the user does not have the necessary permissions on their machine. This will allow all users to download a single installer that just works. This installer is available at the Chrome Frame download page.



As always, we welcome discussions in the Chrome Frame Google group and bug reports on Chromium’s issue tracker.



Posted by Greg Thompson, Software Engineer
URL: http://blog.chromium.org/2011/08/non-admin-chrome-frame-reaches-stable.html

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

[Gd] Beta Channel Update

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Google Chrome Releases: Beta Channel Update

The Beta channel has been updated to 14.0.835.122 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame.  This release contains fixes for a number of stability issues along with other bugs, and an updated version of Adobe Flash Player.  Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log.  Interested in switching to the Beta channel?  Find out how.  If you find a new issue, please let us know by filing a bug.

Jason Kersey
Google Chrome
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2011/08/beta-channel-update_30.html