Friday, May 29, 2009

[Gd] Introducing the Google Wave APIs: what can you build?

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Google Wave Developer Blog: Introducing the Google Wave APIs: what can you build?

Welcome to the Google Wave Developer Blog. This is a new blog where you can learn about the technical aspects of Google Wave, especially the Google Wave APIs and the Google Wave Federation Protocol. In this first post, we'll walk you through the Google Wave APIs that have just been announced as part of the Google Wave developer preview release at Google I/O.

Google Wave is a new communication and collaboration tool that lets people work together more productively online. If you haven't already seen the demo presentation, please take a jump over to learn more about Google Wave by visiting http://wave.google.com/.

The Google Wave APIs come in two flavors: Embed and Extensions. With Embed, you're able to bring waves into your own site through a simple JavaScript API. For example, embedding a wave in a webpage is a good way to encourage a discussion among the visitors. With Extensions, you're able to write programs, which are packaged as Robots or Gadgets, that provide rich functionality inside the Google Wave web client.

Robots are automated participants that are written on the server side, and help perform tasks on behalf of the users, including syncing data with other services. Thus far, Robots are hosted on Google App Engine, and we have client libraries available in the Java language and Python. We're working towards a lower-level Robots API that can be backed by any server on the web. As an example of something you could build, here is a robot we affectionately call "Tweety," which helps you use Twitter easily inside Google Wave.


Gadgets, which you may know from OpenSocial, are client-side programs that make it easy to write full applications inside of Google Wave. The neat part is that we've introduced an extension to the OpenSocial gadgets API that enables you to take advantage of the collaborative nature of Wave when building a gadget. For example, check out this screenshot of a multiplayer Sudoku gadget (available as a sample too):


If you'd like to learn more about the Google Wave APIs: request access to the sandbox, check out the code samples, and join us in the Google Wave API forum.

Posted by Douwe Osinga, Software Engineer, Google Wave APIs
URL: http://googlewavedev.blogspot.com/2009/05/introducing-google-wave-apis-what-can.html

Thursday, May 28, 2009

[Gd] Google I/O 2009 - Day 2 Recap

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Google Code Blog: Google I/O 2009 - Day 2 Recap

Despite a late night letting loose at the After Hours party, developers managed to wake up in time for the early morning Day 2 keynote (after having been promised yet another exciting surprise). This morning, we unveiled an early look at Google Wave, a new collaboration and communication product. Lars and Jens Rasmussen and Stephanie Hannon presented the vision behind Google Wave and a live demo of it in action. All Google I/O attendees will receive developer sandbox accounts to test out and build on the Google Wave APIs.

To see Google Wave for yourself, check out the video of this morning's keynote:



We'll leave you with a few more I/O photos, starting off with last night's After Hours party:


Yesterday evening after I/O, developers let loose and relaxed at the After Hours party. Food, drinks, music, and games were enjoyed by all.


One of the attractions at the Developer Playground area of the party. The Playground featured individuals & organizations doing creative projects with technology, art, games, music.


Enjoying one of the arcade games at After Hours.


Mike Relm performed during the evening, as well as DJ Scotty Boy.


Day 2's keynote opened with Steven Canvin from LEGO® talking about the evolution of MINDSTORMS to an open source approach.


Google Wave co-founder Lars Rasmussen talks about the vision behind the product.


Brothers Lars and Jens Rasmussen co-founded Where 2 Technologies, which was acquired by Google and eventually became Google Maps.


Stephanie Hannon, Google Wave's lead product manager, wows the audience with a live product demo.


The Google Wave team watches the keynote from the front row. The team is based in Sydney.


A view from the video crew desk. Videos and presentations from I/O sessions will be published on code.google.com/io in the coming days - stay tuned.


A developer picks up his Android phone.


The Sandbox interview room. The Google developer relations team conducted interviews with 3rd Party Sandbox exhibitors and will be posting them on the Google Code YouTube Channel in the coming days.


A happy Aussie fish and kangaroo greet developers dropping by Office Hours for Google Wave.


We hope to see you next year!

By Christine Tsai, Google Developer Team
URL: http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/2009/05/google-io-2009-day-2-recap.html

[Gd] Dev update: Larger fonts

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Google Chrome Releases: Dev update: Larger fonts

Google Chrome 3.0.182.3 has been released to the Dev channel.


The people have spoken. The small font issue affecting most non-English languages has been fixed (issue 12309).


Mark Larson
Google Chrome Program Manager  
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2009/05/dev-update-larger-fonts.html

[Gd] Chrome Experiments at Google I/O

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Google Code Blog: Chrome Experiments at Google I/O

Google I/O is well underway, and we're excited that we've been able to highlight some Chrome Experiments at the event. During the keynote on Wednesday, we opened with the following video. Matt Waddell from our Developer team composed the music playing in the background. We're posting a subtitled version of the video, so you can enjoy the song in all it's HTML5 glory.



We've loved the experiments we've received so far and encourage you to check out the ones listed below:
We're continually updating Chrome Experiments to feature new and crazy JavaScript experiments, so keep submitting!

By Aaron Koblin, Google Chrome Team
URL: http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/2009/05/chrome-experiments-at-google-io.html

[Gd] Mercurial Now Available to All Open Source Projects

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Google Code Blog: Mercurial Now Available to All Open Source Projects

About a month ago we announced Mercurial support for early testers. Today, we are happy to announce that all Project Hosting users can create a new Mercurial project and convert their existing projects from Subversion to Mercurial

We also want to thank the projects that helped us test support for Mercurial. Projects like Clojure-Dev and Spice of Creation helped us discover new usage patterns and fix several unforeseen issues. Unlike our mature Subversion implementation, there are still a few issues/features that we are working on. 

We therefore encourage everyone to be familiar with what is supported before picking Mercurial.

Please let us know if you have any feedback or find any issues. If you're coming to Google I/O, be sure to come meet us in person and hear our talk about Mercurial on Bigtable this Thursday at 3:45pm-4:45pm in Moscone West - Room 5. We have Mercurial SWAG!

By Ali Pasha, Google Code Team
URL: http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/2009/05/mercurial-now-available-to-all-open.html

[Gd] Mercurial Now Available to All Open Source Projects

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Google Code Blog: Mercurial Now Available to All Open Source Projects

About a month ago we announced Mercurial support for early testers. Today, we are happy to announce that all Project Hosting users can create a new Mercurial project and convert their existing projects from Subversion to Mercurial

We also want to thank the projects that helped us test support for Mercurial. Projects like Clojure-Dev and Spice of Creation helped us discover new usage patterns and fix several unforeseen issues. Unlike our mature Subversion implementation, there are still a few issues/features that we are working on. 

We therefore encourage everyone to be familiar with what is supported before picking Mercurial.

Please let us know if you have any feedback or find any issues. If you're coming to Google I/O, be sure to come meet us in person and hear our talk about Mercurial on Bigtable this Thursday at 3:45pm-4:45pm in Moscone West - Room 5. We have Mercurial SWAG!

By Ali Pasha, Google Code Team
URL: http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/2009/05/mercurial-now-available-to-all-open.html

[Gd] Cyworld plans to adopt OpenSocial

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OpenSocial API Blog: Cyworld plans to adopt OpenSocial

Annyonghaseyo!

My name is Kyle Kim and I work on the Open Cyworld project at SK Communications in Korea. We are very excited to announce that we plan to adopt OpenSocial for Cyworld, which is the biggest social networking service in Korea with more than 23 million members registered under their real names!

Also known as the first ever SNS with an established business model of selling virtual items with own virtual currency, Dotori (acorns), we are looking for quality applications that will enhance our users’ experience on Cyworld.

We plan to launch a closed beta developer sandbox in July and an open beta service by the end of September (Dotori payment API will be launched later this year). There will also be a conference in July, introducing Open Cyworld project to media, industry as well as developers.

We believe there will be plenty of opportunities for you as a developer:
  • The biggest real-name based network in the world
  • Payment API with proven virtual currency, Dotori
  • Viral distribution system integrated with NateOn, the leading instant messenger in Korea with 27 million registered members
We are at Google I/O this week, and would be happy to meet developers interested in Cyworld!

About SK Communications

SK Communications is an affiliate of SK Group, the 3rd largest corporation in Korea, and a direct subsidiary of SK Telecom, the dominant telecommunications provider in Korea with over 50% of market share.

A leading online service provider, SK Communications offers wide range of services including Cyworld (SNS), NateOn (IM), Nate (Portal), etc.

About Cyworld

Cyworld is the biggest real-name based social networking service in the world. With more than 23 million registered members, Cyworld users consist of 48% of total Korean population and 66% of all internet users in Korea. Main business model is digital item sales, which includes decorations for “Minihompies” and music.

Cyworld earns more than 7 billion KRW per month in revenue from digital item sales; Average revenue per user is about 2,700 KRW per month.

Cyworld Fact Sheet (as of December 2008)
  • 23 million registered members
  • Among them, 13.6 million members log in on the site more than once per month
  • Average number of 1-chon (friends) per member, 47.8
  • All Cyworld members are connected to each other by 4.5 degrees of separation
  • 6.6 billion photographs uploaded
  • 19.6 billion postings
  • 12 million postings posted everyday
  • 8 million replies posted everyday
  • 2,320 stars with Cyworld Minihompies
  • 1.7 million members visiting their Minihompies everyday
If you’re interested in writing apps for Cyworld, please contact Dyne, who works for Corporate Development Team (dynelee@skcomms.co.kr)

Posted by Kyle Kim, Cyworld Team
URL: http://blog.opensocial.org/2009/05/cyworld-plans-to-adopt-opensocial.html

[Gd] Gears 0.5.21.0 Released

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Gears API Blog: Gears 0.5.21.0 Released

Posted by Ian Fette, Gears Team

In conjunction with Google I/O we're releasing a new version of Gears, 0.5.21.0. This version includes minor bugfixes and three new features:
  • Drag & Drop support for dragging files into a web page and letting the web page act on those files
  • Image thumbnailing
  • Blob builder API, which allows script to build binary blobs, including valid multi-part-form-encoded blobs that contain binary file parts, which can then be uploaded using Gears.HttpRequest
Documentation on http://code.google.com/apis/gears/ will be updated soon with more details about the new features.
URL: http://gearsblog.blogspot.com/2009/05/gears-05210-released.html

[Gd] Hello World, Meet Google Wave

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Google Code Blog: Hello World, Meet Google Wave

This morning at Google I/O we are unveiling a developer preview of Google Wave, a new collaboration and communication product. Google Wave introduces a new platform built around hosted conversations called waves--this model enables people to communicate and work together in new and more effective ways. On top of that, with the Google Wave APIs, developers can take advantage of this collaborative system by building on the Google Wave platform. We want to expand upon that platform, which is why we've put together the initial draft of the Google Wave Federation Protocol, the underlying network protocol for sharing waves between wave providers.

Yes, that's between wave providers: anyone can build a wave server and interoperate, much like anyone can run their own SMTP server. The wave protocol is open to contributions by the broader community with the goal to continue to improve how we share information, together. If you're interested in getting involved, here are a few things you should check out on www.waveprotocol.org:
This is just the beginning. To help potential wave providers get started, our plan is to release an open source, production-quality, reference implementation of the Google Wave client and server, as well as provide an open federation endpoint by the time users start getting access.

We're eager to hear your feedback, so please tell us about your interest, and drop a note on the technical engineering forum with your feedback.

Beyond the federation protocol, you may also be interested in learning more about the Google Wave APIs, as described on the new Google Wave Developers blog.

By Dan Peterson, Google Wave Team
URL: http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/2009/05/hello-world-meet-google-wave.html

[Gd] New GWT App Gallery posted (check it out)

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Google Web Toolkit Blog: New GWT App Gallery posted (check it out)

A couple months ago, we asked the community to tell us about their GWT applications and their experience developing them. We were greatly pleased to see many responses, and lots of neat applications. In fact, we had so many responses that we needed a better way to showcase and share them with the community.

Introducing the new GWT Application Gallery to save the day, now posted on the GWT homepage. Improving on the earlier GWT Application Gallery, the new gallery adds more features to make community interaction easier and application entries more meaningful. Here are some of these new features that you can look forward to:

  • An easier way to submit entries for any GWT-related tools or application that you would like to share with the community
  • A comment and rating system for others in the GWT community to rate your applications
  • More screen real estate for application screenshots and thumbnails for your application entry
  • Searchable tags that you can apply to your GWT application entry

We already have a number of entries both from the previous app gallery and newer entries from respondents to our call out a few months ago, and we'd love to hear from you too. So please, check out the new GWT App Gallery to see the kind of great applications the community has been developing, share your opinions through the comments and ratings feature, and add your own applications to the gallery.

As a sidenote, Google I/O is in full swing. In the spirit of sharing applications and development experiences, we've organized a Developer Sandbox area this year where third party developers who have used Google developer products can showcase their applications and talk about how they've created them. If you're attending Google I/O, drop by to check out some of these products live. I'll be around that area as well, so please come by to say hello.

URL: http://googlewebtoolkit.blogspot.com/2009/05/new-gwt-app-gallery-posted-check-it-out.html

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

[Gd] Google I/O 2009 - Day 1 Recap

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Google Code Blog: Google I/O 2009 - Day 1 Recap

Day 1 of Google I/O was an action-packed endeavor, shared with an excited community of developers on the ground learning about developing web applications with Google and open technologies, and showcasing some of their best apps.

Here are a few highlights from our keynote speech:
  • Google Web Elements is launched: Adding Google products to your website or blog has never been easier.
  • App Engine for Java is now out of preview and open for signups
  • Google Web Toolkit 2.0 previewed upcoming new features, including in-browser debugging and developer-guided code splitting (also known as runAsync())
  • Android Developer Challenge 2 launched: Win awards for building great apps on Android
  • Google Latitude on iPhone 3.0 was previewed
Check out a video playlist of this morning's keynote:


Since a picture is worth a thousand words, we thought we'd recap the 1st day of I/O with photos captured throughout the day:


In case attendees had trouble finding Moscone West, they were directed to look for the life-sized Google Maps pin placed right in front of the entrance.


I/O 2009 had higher attendance, but registration went much more smoothly this year.


An attendee checks out the I/O agenda board. Product stickers were distributed to attendees to stick on their conferences badges to identify fellow attendees with similar product interests.


Eric Schmidt greeted developers and kicked off the keynote


Vic Gundotra takes the stage to talk about "a more powerful web, made easier."


Vic welcomes Jay Sullivan, VP of Mozilla, while also thanking Mozilla and the larger developer community for tireless efforts towards new web standards. Jay gave a glimpse of Firefox 3.5 features.


Michael Abbott, SVP of Palm, talks about why the web is the platform and Palm webOS.


A view from the audience.


We gave all Google I/O attendees a limited edition Android-powered device in order to encourage and facilitate further application development on the Android platform, and provided a preview of Donut features.


Office Hours are a new addition to I/O, where attendees can drop in and bring questions for Google engineers. View Office Hours schedule.


Alon Levi speaks on his App Engine session, From Spark Plug to Drive Train: Life of an App Engine Request.


At the Google Web Toolkit Fireside Chat - members of the GWT team listen to audience question.


Anybot struck up conversation and hung out with developers.


View of the Developer Sandbox from the escalator.


Enjoying a complimentary chair massage.


Developers crashed on bean bags, taking a break to check email and get some work done.


The Street View trike roamed the halls.


A developer pondering what to grab from the drink coolers, available throughout Level 2 for attendees to quench their thirst.


Developers enjoyed bins of chocolate covered raisins, M&Ms, pretzels, trail mix, and other goodies throughout the day.

To follow the latest at Google I/O, check out twitter and twazzup. Stay tuned for Day 2!

By Christine Tsai, Min Li Chan & Mike Marchak, Google Developer Team
URL: http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/2009/05/google-io-2009-day-1-recap.html

[Gd] Dev Channel Release 3.0.182.2

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Google Chrome Releases: Dev Channel Release 3.0.182.2

[Edits: Google chrome now supports the video tag. Also adding a note about the known issue with small fonts. --mal, 27 May 2009]

Google Chrome 3.0.182.2 has been released to the Dev channel.

Highlights for this release:
  • Google Chrome now supports the video tag.
  • --auto-spell-correct flag will fix common typos like "teh" for "the" in the blink of an eye.
  • Various bits of UI clean-up (toolbar and dangerous download bar paint issues).
  • Multiple crash fixes.
Known Issue:
  • The font in the browser's user interface is very small in most non-English languages. This will be fixed in the next Dev channel update. (Issue 12309).
Version Changes:
  • WebKit - 531.0
  • V8 - 1.2.5.1
  • Gears - 0.5.21.0
The release notes are available as well as a detailed list of all revisions.

You can find out about getting on the Dev channel here:
http://dev.chromium.org/getting-involved/dev-channel.

If you find new issues, please let us know by filing a bug at
http://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/entry.

Anthony Laforge
Technical Program Manager
URL: http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2009/05/dev-channel-release-301822.html

[Gd] Easy as 1-2-3 - introducing Google Web Elements

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Google AJAX APIs Blog: Easy as 1-2-3 - introducing Google Web Elements


Today at Google I/O, we launched Google Web Elements with one goal in mind - making life easier for developers. Google Web Elements make it incredibly simple to add Google products to your site, app or blog. It's so easy, you'll feel like you're cheating. Inspired by the convenience of embeddable YouTube videos, Google Web Elements allow you to add products like Google Custom Search, Google Docs, and Google Maps to your website with the simplicity of copy and paste. For instance, here's the new Google News element:



Each element is designed to help you get started quickly without spending time on the deep technical details. Yet behind it all, Google Web Elements are powered by Google's scalable and flexible developer APIs, offering a world of customization just beneath the surface, keeping up with your site as it grows.

For more details, check out the Google Code and Custom Search blogs. Google Web Elements are already available for eight of our most popular products, with more soon to follow. To get started, visit the Google Web Elements homepage and please be sure to let us know what you'd like to see us work on next.

Want to know what else is going on at Google I/O? Follow us on twitter @googleio and twazzup.
URL: http://googleajaxsearchapi.blogspot.com/2009/05/easy-as-1-2-3-introducing-google-web.html